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Moody 41DS review: Could this model win you over to the decksaloon lifestyle?

Yachting World

  • November 19, 2020

With the introduction of its smallest decksaloon model, has Moody defined a new genre of 40ft cruisers? David Harding sails the Moody 41DS

Product Overview

Manufacturer:, price as reviewed:.

Whatever your opinion of decksaloons, there’s something extremely civilised about being able to walk ‘inside’ from the cockpit, staying on the same level and looking out through big windows.

Of course decksaloons are nothing new, and they come in all shapes and sizes. The one on Moody’s 41DS, however, is likely to win new converts, including people who might otherwise be tempted by a catamaran or even a motorboat. Opening to the cockpit via a push-and-slide door, it gives you a virtually uninterrupted 360° view of the outside world.

You have the galley immediately next to the door, with a large hatch opening to the cockpit for extra light and ventilation. Descending to the depths to put the kettle on will become a distant memory.

Moody-41DS-yacht-review-galley

Galley, dining-lounging area and chart table occupy the decksaloon, which has virtually unrestricted views all round

Moody’s newest decksaloon model is all about inside/outside living space – and a lot of each. A hard top covers the cockpit forward of the wheels, the centre canvas section sliding away so you can sit in the sun if you choose. Naturally you have a bathing platform at the stern and there’s also a seating-cum-lounging area in the bow, creating a sort of forward cockpit.

And down below? Well, the Moody is truly cavernous. Bill Dixon’s team drew a boat with plumb ends, high freeboard, full forward sections, near-vertical topsides, a broad stern incorporating a soft chine, and the beam carried well forward, creating a vast volume for the interior designers in Germany to play with. It has been used to create a supremely comfortable interior for a couple with occasional guest or second couple.

No attempt has been made to squeeze in extra berths or cabins, so the Moody boasts living space and stowage on a scale few boats of this length can match.

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Form following function

If the first time you see the Moody is from the bow, your eye will inevitably be drawn to the broad flat stem with its hard corners. That aside, there’s nothing particularly out of the ordinary about the hull shape in the context of a modern voluminous cruising yacht.

The full bow sections will more than accommodate the small loss of buoyancy from the bow thruster in its tunnel and support the weight of the optional 100m of stainless steel anchor chain, not to mention a full water tank under the berth in the owner’s cabin. Helped by the broad stem, a deep forefoot allows the bow thruster to be mounted well forward for maximum effect.

Staying below the waterline and moving aft, we find an L-shaped iron fin keel of moderate proportions giving a draught of 2.25m/7ft 5in. That’s unless you pay extra, as had the owners of Aurelia , our test boat, for the 1.85m/6ft 1in alternative. Propulsion is via a saildrive well forward of a single deep rudder.

Moody-41DS-yacht-review-aft-running-shot-credit-David-Harding

Photo: David Harding

Back above the water, fold-down boarding steps neatly incorporated into the solid stainless steel tubular guardrails help you scale the topsides. The sunken side decks are protected by high bulwarks and extend all the way to the bow – just as on the original Moody 45DS that we tested back in 2008.

Overhead is a deck-stepped double-spreader rig of high-fractional configuration. It supports a self-tacking jib and a mainsail that, though slab-reefing as standard, is almost invariably going to be of push-button in-mast persuasion, as on our test boat.

Moving towards the stern you find twin wheels with seats right aft. The forward lower section of the cockpit sole is on the same level as the deck saloon’s. By now, with 15-20 knots blowing across a gloriously sunny Solent, I was keen to leave the marina behind and see how this voluminous shape behaved at sea.

Moody-41DS-yacht-review-aerial-view

Life on the ocean wave

As you’d expect of a modern yacht with a bow thruster (and the option of a stern thruster), manoeuvring presented no particular challenges. That said, windage would inevitably be a factor in a breeze.

In open water the 57hp of Yanmar pushed us along quietly and smoothly, 1,500 rpm giving 6.3 knots and 2,100 rpm 7 knots. Hinging up the cockpit sole reveals the engine set in its smooth, wipe-clean moulding and with a good amount of space all round. Additional access is from the front, via the decksaloon.

You have a choice of helming position under power or sail. Standing at the wheel to see over the coachroof might initially seem the obvious approach, though you will have a blind spot immediately forward of the bow unless you’re well over 6ft tall. Much of the time it’s better to look through the windows (all in toughened glass) from one of the helm seats.

Moody-41DS-yacht-review-helm-credit-David-Harding

Wide seats behind the twin wheels give a good choice of helming position. Photo: David Harding

Structural advances have allowed pillars to become smaller and window area much larger than would have been possible only a few years ago, so your visibility is largely unrestricted if you sit down.

The biggest challenge can be reflection in the glass, especially if you’re on the starboard side and facing the double layer of reflections from the open door slid across inside the aft end of the saloon. It helps to move around periodically, both from side to side and to alternate between standing and sitting. I found it useful on occasions to stand on the helm seat for a totally clear view over the coachroof – a position that’s unlikely to feature in Moody’s book of good practice.

Setting sail is straightforward enough (more on that later). A Seldén Furlex 304 is standard for the self-tacker, as is the pair of electric Lewmar 45 primary winches. You can use the port one to furl or reef the jib if you need to.

Moody-41DS-yacht-review-cockpit-credit-David-Harding

Visibility forward through the deck saloon from the cockpit is good, though reflections can be distracting. Photo: David Harding

With the main fully unfurled too and a few tweaks made, we settled down to beat into a breeze that ranged between 12 and 22 knots. At its upper end this was probably as much as the boat wanted under full sail, but the flat water gave us options that wouldn’t have been on offer in a seaway and we were perfectly comfortable most of the time.

This is a boat that definitely likes to be sailed ‘full and by’ in the old parlance: sailing deep enough to keep the log reading in the mid 6s felt best for VMG and gave us a tacking angle of within 85° on the compass. Matching the polars might have been easier with the help of a folding prop instead of the fixed three-blader.

For a boat of this nature it was a creditable performance, even allowing for the near-ideal conditions. Elvstrom’s FCL laminate upgrades from the standard Dacron sails are undoubtedly worth having, not least because the greater stability of the fabric allows the mainsail to carry a larger roach.

Moody-41DS-yacht-review-bow-locker

A large locker in the bow, with a hatch in the bottom for access to the bow thruster and forward for the anchor locker

We also had the optional outer forestay and a genoa on an electric furler. Given factors such as the Moody’s high windage and the modest spread of sail with the self-tacker, extra canvas would be welcome in under 10 knots or so. Instead of a genoa, you might favour a lighter sail designed for greater wind angles if you reckon on motoring upwind in light airs anyway.

Since we were enjoying moderately fresh conditions, we waited to unfurl the genoa until the wind was approaching the beam, and then surged along with the log nudging over 8 knots at times.

In terms of general obedience, the Moody was not found wanting. The rudder is big enough to maintain grip beyond what would be considered normal angles of heel for a boat like this, unlike on some earlier Moodys that have been known to spin round and face whence they came with little provocation.

Moody-41DS-yacht-review-liferaft-stowage

A hatch in the stern between the helm seats houses the liferaft stowage, and also opens to the lowered bathing platform

Helming positions are comfortable from windward or leeward, giving good sight of the jib’s luff, and the feel through the Jefa steering is positive. Our test boat had the optional Carbonautica composite wheels, a well-worth-having upgrade from stainless steel.

Given the nature of the boat, it would be churlish to moan too much about particular aspects of the performance and handling. Nonetheless, as it’s designed to – and does – sail, a few observations are worth making. Visibility of the headsails when you’re furling or unfurling them from the cockpit isn’t great. It’s is a function of enjoying the protection of a decksaloon and a hard top: you can’t have it all ways.

Managing the rig

Colour-coding the lines, led aft through tunnels to the clutches and winches forward of the helm stations each side, would make life easier. On our test boat they were all white with variations of black and grey fleck.

Moody-41DS-yacht-review-steering-mechanism

Access from the stern to the steering mechanism is good

As for sail trim, a self-tacking jib will always twist open too far when the sheet is eased. Similarly, a mainsheet taken to a fixed point close below the boom (such as on top of the coachroof) will also lose its downward component. At times when sailing upwind we felt like de-powering slightly.

Dropping the traveller would normally be one of the first steps if you had one. Easing the mainsheet with this arrangement will principally twist the sail open even if you crank the vang on hard, and is a de-powering tool to be used in moderation. Realistically with the Moody, reefing the mainsail to the first batten will probably be the answer.

Still in the cockpit and looking at other aspects, perhaps my biggest grouse is the all-too-common absence of stowage for small items – binoculars, phones, drinks and so on that you want to be able to grab without having to dive into one of the cavernous lockers either side beneath the cockpit seats (and you have to be very careful not to trap any lines near the hinges when you close the heavy lids again).

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The 57hp Yanmar lives beneath the cockpit sole, with additional front access

These lockers contain the two diesel tanks and leave copious amounts of space for everything else, while the liferaft lives just above the static waterline in the stern, below the helm seats, and would be easy to slide into the water with the bathing platform lowered. A hatch in the stern gives access to the inside of the transom and is often awash, so you would want to be sure that it seals as it should.

Moving forward, the recessed side decks are easy to negotiate but there’s nothing to stop green water running aft all the way to the cockpit. On the leeward side it should flow straight out through the stern. If you get green water on the weather deck, it seems likely that some of it will end up in the cockpit’s lower section. Drains here should get rid of the water, though its arrival might come as a surprise to people who weren’t expecting to get wet feet.

Inside living

In the decksaloon we find the galley along the port side, a chart table forward to port (with the optional third helm station on our test boat) and a large seating area around the table to starboard. Spend another £2,500 or so and you can lower the table at the push of a button to create an extra double berth or large lounging area. Mahogany joinery is standard, the golden oak on Aurelia being among the options.

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Bright and airy in the galley and full visibility from the chart table

Lifting the sole board in the galley reveals steps down to the ‘cellar’, a utility area complete with space for a washing machine and a second fridge as well as stowage and access to some of the electrical systems. On the whole, access to the essential systems seems good throughout the boat, partly because of the general and very welcome lack of cramming. Interior mouldings are used sparingly and much of the interior is formed by the joinery, allowing access to the outer hull.

When you go forward from the decksaloon and drop down a level, you find the main electrical panel to starboard by the steps, protected by a hinged door.

Straight ahead in the full bow is the master cabin, complete with semi-island berth. There is stacks of stowage and hanging space, an abundance of natural light, more than generous headroom and a spacious en-suite heads and shower. As standard, this heads is shared (via an extra door) with the guest cabin to starboard. I suspect most owners will choose the additional heads to port in a space otherwise used for walk-in stowage.

Moody-41DS-yacht-review-forecabin

Full bow sections, lots of light and plenty of height make for a big and bright owner’s cabin

The guest cabin can have a double berth, twins, or twins with an infill for a double conversion. As the pictures show, the overall styling is modern without being garish and the detailing and quality of finish are hard to fault.

Sirius-40DS

Beautifully finished and designed for real cruising, the Sirius has a more traditional feel.

Price: €502,521 (ex. VAT)

Wauquiez-PS42-credit-Robin-Christol

Features pronounced chines, with twin rudders and an aft cockpit over one or two double cabins.

Price: €380,000 (ex. VAT)

Nautitech-40-open-catamaran-credit-Jean-Francois-Romero

With aft helms giving familiarity to monohull sailors, this voluminous cat sails well and offers plenty.

Price: €311,990 (ex. VAT)

It’s fascinating to see how Bill Dixon and Moody have developed the decksaloon yacht since the Eclipse range of the 1980s and 1990s. The changes in 30 years are quite remarkable. As for the question of whether the Moody 41DS is a lifestyle cruiser, the answer has to be a resounding ‘yes’. In some contexts such a description might be seen as a euphemism at best. In this case it’s what the boat is – simply and unashamedly. This is a boat for people who, whatever their boating background, want to spend extended periods aboard, most probably in port or at anchor much of the time. Purists, performance sailors and bluewater yachtsmen would be unlikely to give it a second glance unless planning a major change of direction in their sailing career. By contrast, it will provide a lot to think about for those who might alternatively be considering a catamaran or a motorboat for the space, one-level living and sheltered cockpit. So calling it a lifestyle cruiser is anything but an insult. It’s not that this boat won’t perform respectably well under sail, because it does, or that there’s any reason why it shouldn’t complete the ARC and sail home again too, because it could. It’s just that the Moody’s purpose and its strengths lie elsewhere, and its ‘strengths elsewhere’ are pretty impressive.

Moody DS 41 : The smallest Moody in the YACHT test

Fridtjof Gunkel

 ·  01.10.2023

Features: Deckhouse, cockpit and saloon on one level, raised steering positions, pronounced bulwark, softchines

The competition of the Moody DS 41

The measured values for testing the moody ds 41.

  • The Moody DS 41 in detail: Technical data and more

YACHT rating of the Moody DS 41

  • Video of the Moody DS 41

Evil tongues claim that designers print out drawings of their yachts in the copier at a lower zoom level when they are commissioned to produce a smaller model of a successful boat. In reality, however, this does not usually work, because one factor remains - the human being with his typical dimensions, ergonomic requirements, learnt processes; after all, the human being does not shrink with the boat. Consequently, the freeboard on the smaller boat must be higher in relation, the number of cabins less, the space less, the distribution different, a new prioritisation is needed.

Example Moody. Apart from the 41 with aft cockpit, the upmarket line from Hanseyachts AG consists of deck saloon yachts and is characterised by its unique spatial concept. The cockpit, saloon, navigation and galley are all on the same level, just like on a catamaran or motorboat. The helm stations are mounted on deck. Only cabins and storage spaces are located on the lower level. The seating areas and the interior helm stations are on a higher level and the superstructure is glazed all round. This ensures a perfect 360-degree view when seated or standing.

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The highly acclaimed and well-selling Moody DS 45 was the first in-house development following the takeover of the traditional English shipyard by the expanding Hansegroup. The Greifswald-based company, at that time still under the leadership of its founder and, after the IPO, CEO Michael Schmidt, did not take over any designs and moulds, but did take on the long-serving in-house designer Bill Dixon, who has been responsible for the DS line ever since.

The designer, who works near the former Moody shipyard in Southampton, managed to realise the specifications formulated by Schmidt: "Light, visibility and life on one level. That's what people have always wanted."

Tradition meets innovation with the Moody DS 41

Schmidt and Dixon remained committed to the shipyard's history. Moody, founded back in 1830, has always stood for solidly built and well-equipped yachts suitable for blue water. And the latter means, as long-distance sailing icon Bobby Schenk puts it, that the crew spends a lot of time on board, but 80 per cent of it in the harbour. And this is where Moody's concept comes in. The other considerations are also based on the habits of the crew. They will spend two thirds of the day on deck, in the cockpit, in the saloon and galley and only spend the rest of the time in the wet cells and berths. It therefore seems sensible to organise the most frequent routes on one level and make them as comfortable as possible.

Another aspect: life on board during the day on a DS is no longer divided into activities on deck and below deck, but the crew is together for all activities. Those who cook are not in the cellar; those who navigate have visual contact with the helmsman; those who seek shade or protection are in the saloon and are still part of the action. Perfect socialising during the day, ideal separation at night.

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The Moody DS 41 in detail

Socialise at the top, separate at the bottom: The layout is reminiscent of a cat | Drawing: YACHT/N. Campe

Technical data of the Moody DS 41

  • DesignerBill Dixon
  • CE design category A
  • Hull length11.99 m
  • Total length12.52 m
  • Waterline length11.42 m
  • Width 4.20 m
  • Draught/alternative2.14/1.83 m
  • Theor. hull speed 8.21 kn
  • Weight11.2 tonnes
  • Ballast/proportion3.13 t/28 %
  • Mast height above waterline 19.92 m
  • Mainsail45.0 m2
  • Self-tacking jib 38.0 m2
  • Engine (Yanmar) 42 kW/57 hp
  • Fuel tank (plastic)210 litres
  • Fresh water tank (plastic) 220/180 litres
  • Holding tank (plastic) 54 litres each

Hull and deck construction

Sandwich laminate in hand lay-up process, balsa wood as core material. Iso-gelcoat and vinyl ester resin in first layer. Bulkheads and deck laminated

Equipment and prices

  • Base price ex shipyard: € 624,631 incl. 19 % VAT
  • Warranty: 2 years
  • Standard equipment included: engine, sheets, railing, position lanterns, battery, compass, cushions, galley/cooker, bilge pump, toilet, sailcloth, anchor/chain, fenders, electric cooler, holding tank with suction system

Also included in the price:

  • Teak deck, bow thruster, electric winches, side ladders, second water tank, mast steps, helmsman's seats

As of 09/2023, how the prices shown are defined can be found here !

Hanseyachts AG, Ladebower Chausee 11, 17493 Greifswald, phone 03834/5792-200; www.hanseyachtsag.com

Distribution

Dealer network

The smallest Moody offers plenty of comfort both underway and in the harbour and still fulfils sailing requirements. It is also suitable for use all year round, offers plenty of storage space, is neatly built and equipped to a high standard, even in the standard version

Design and concept

  • + Unique layout
  • + Well protected cockpit
  • + Lots of storage space
  • + Deck very safe to walk on

Sailing performance and trim

  • + Reasonable potential
  • + Suitable for one hand

Living and finishing quality

  • + Spacious cabins
  • + Sensible room distribution
  • - Poorly ventilated centre cabin
  • - Forward berth quite narrow

Equipment and technology

  • + High-quality equipment
  • + Inside steering position feasible

This article first appeared in YACHT 11/2020 and has been updated for this online version.

The Moody DS 41 in the video:

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Moody Unveils DS48: A New Dimension in Bluewater Yachting

Moody DS48

Moody introduces the DS48 – a medium-sized bluewater yach t designed to meet the most discerning needs. Following the success of its predecessors, the award-winning DS41 and DS54, the DS48 continues the Mood y legacy with its expansive saloon offering a panoramic 360-degree view of the surroundings. Unique to Moody is the comfortable and secure walkaround deck with a high bulwark and fixed railing, providing a distinctive experience akin to a catamaran on a single hull.

Collaboratively designed with Bill Dixon and the Dixon Yacht Design team, the DS48 epitomizes the signature blend of volume and performance seen in the Moody DS range. This 48-foot gem promises the typical Moody ‘monomaran’ experience, ensuring a seamless transition between the generously protected cockpit and the deck saloon.

Moody DS48

The interior is exceptionally spacious, a testament to the voluminous hull design. While offering a safe and comfortable sailing experience in all conditions, the DS48 stands out as a true owner’s boat for blue water sailing, boasting perfect sailing characteristics. Versatility is key, with numerous layout variations making it adaptable for various preferences and needs.

Moody DS48 Key Features

Hull: Composite bulkheads laminated to the hull guarantee maximum structural stability. The DS48 features a standard tunnel bow thruster with a holding function, complemented by an optional retractable stern thruster for precision in tight spaces. The large dinghy garage accommodates an inflatable boat up to 2.8 meters, with the optional Moody Smart Tender System making dinghy operations effortless.

Moody DS48

Deck: The iconic Moody walkaround deck ensures exceptional safety at sea, featuring a high bulwark and fixed railing. The foredeck offers a spacious sun pad, and an optional dinette is available, complete with a table stowed in the separate sail locker. The floating roof, resting on sturdy aluminum supports, can be covered with solar panels for extended autonomy away from the harbor.

Hallberg-Rassy 44 Bluewater sailboats

Rig: The high-performance rig with three pairs of spreaders and a sail area of up to 156 sqm ensures excellent sailing characteristics. An optional furling mast with a double forestay is available.

Cockpit: The openable soft top reveals two cockpit tables, ample seating areas, and additional seating options in the rear cockpit area. An optional wet bar at the stern with a barbecue grill, fridge, and sink enhances hospitality. Two large stowage lockers provide ample space for a long voyage. The elevated helmsman’s position offers an unobstructed view, and the bathing platform, accessed via a comfortable staircase, leads to the water through optional bathing stairs.

Moody DS48

Deck Saloon: Seamlessly laminated safety glass windows in the saloon offer a 360-degree panoramic view. The spacious L-shaped galley features a three-burner gas cooktop, large worktop, and optional amenities such as a dishwasher and up to 380-liter refrigerator capacity.

Moody DS48

Interior: The DS48 offers approximately 25% more interior space compared to a 58-foot yacht, thanks to the deck saloon overlapping with the aft cabin. Three cabins and up to three bathrooms with separate showers are possible, with the third cabin configurable as a multifunctional space. Abundant natural light in the saloon and cabins, coupled with a thoughtful ventilation concept, ensures a pleasant atmosphere throughout.

Starting at a base price of €864,900 plus VAT, the Moody DS48 will make the international debut at boot Dusseldorf 2024 (20-28 January).

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Moody 31 MkII   Yachting monthly review - opinions?

  • Thread starter Martyn Johnson
  • Start date 15/5/20

Martyn Johnson

Having decided that a M31 is an ideal choice for our first boat I have been reading reports on here and on line. I came across a M31 bilge keel review in YM Sep 2017, I would appreciate M31 owners comments on points in the review and put my mind at rest that I have made the correct decision. 1) A touch skittish 2) Like sailing a dinghy 3) Impossible to shift main sheet traveler under load 4) Wheel steer option, no room to turn over in aft cabin 5) Young persons boat, too wild for senior sailors. Overall the review was positive Regards, Martyn  

Dick Holness

Dick Holness

Can I just check, bearing in mind the review date which is long after the Moody 31 ceased production....... you do mean the Moody 31, do you, and not the Moody S31? The S31 was in production in 2017 and is a completely different boat.  

Morning Dick, It was a second hand boat review by Dick Durham on a M31 called Aquaholic. Martyn  

I can only say that Dick Durham is used to sailing gaffers............ I'm sure you'll get some M31 owners along soon.  

Adam Chalklin

Hi We own a gorgeous Moody 31 to give my subjective view on each point skittish/ like a dinghy - we do not find this at all, I have sailed her along side boats of similar size and delighted we have been able to sail a much more consistent and controlled course in 25 to 30 knot winds Agree moving the traveller to windward under load upwind is not easy. Some owners have modified their travellers to fix the concern but it’s not a major issue for us (if necessary we put a bit of grunt into it, spill some wind, or wait and plan it as we tack ) 2 in the aft berth is tight for the middle (we call it the coffin berth ) but heh she is only 31 ft I am 50 so don’t mind it being called a young persons boat hopefully this helps Adam  

Geoff Binfield

Geoff Binfield

Hi Martyn We have had our 31Mk 2 (our first and only boat) for 15 years and for the last 12 years we have spent 12 continuous weeks of every summer on board. Our sailing area has extended from Biscay Ports to the Orkneys with most points in between including UK east and west coasts & N Ireland. We do not find her skittish. Clearly she is is not as firm as a large boat but in her class she is excellent. Yes the traveller can be hard to move under high load but that must apply to all boats. We always manage and in extremes you can simply lighten the load on the sail first. Our boat is a wheel steer version with bilge keels. Yes there is less room in the aft cabin as a result but I am 6’ 2” and 13.5 st and have no problem. Room at hip region only leaves a couple of inches at worst when turning over but that’s ok. If I can manage without complaint for 90 straight nights at a time it can’t be too bad! The berth is full king size width at the head. As for being a young persons boat I don’t get that all. We bought her when I was 57 and we are now in our 70s and love the boat. She is so easy to handle and plenty big enough for 2 to live in comfort. Single handed sailing is also good. Over the years we have made lots of personal improvements. For handling, having all lines go back to the cockpit is a great safety measure. No need for either off us to leave the cockpit other than for handling fenders and warps. Hope that helps. Geoff  

Peter Wright

Peter Wright

Hi Martyn, I have never owned a Moody 31, but I have sailed a couple of them and I'm surprised by the quotes from Dick Durham's review. I can only think that Dick was having an off day. While it's true that he is widely experienced in sailing gaffers and sailing barges, he also has experience of modern yachts and normally I respect his views. However, in this case I'm sure he is wrong. A Moody 31 is considerably less skittish than a Westerly Fulmar, and I'm not sure I would call a Fulmar skittish - they were for decades widely respected as the best yacht for training beginners because they extracted reasonable performance from a very stable design. Certainly both boats are less skittish than a Beneteau 31 of the same era. I love yachts that sail like dinghies - to me that means that you get instant feedback through the feel (both tiller and seat of your pants) while she remains easily controllable. A Moody 31 will not heel like a dinghy, in fact they sail flatter than most yachts of that size. Like all of Bill Dixon's designs, the helm is light and you will find that if, going to weather, you heel her until the lee rail is down to the sea, tucking in a reef will cause speed to increase - you reefed too late! That is Bill's trade mark. On a boat of that size, as I have said here before, I would steer clear of wheel steering. Not only will it take away from space in the rear cabin and space in the cockpit, it will trap the helmsman in one position far more than a tiller will. A tiller also gives far more feedback than a wheel and you have no need of the extra power on the rudder a wheel gives, especially if she sails like a dinghy. As Geoff says, improving the main sheet car adjusting arrangement is not a major job - I would do it and also make the genoa cars towable for adjustment, but I just like tweaking things. At my age, I'm not into ageism. Peter.  

Morning all, Many thanks for taking the time to reply to questions that I am sure you have all heard before. My mind is now made up more than ever, all I need to do now is find a looked after tiller steered version for sale. In the meantime I will continue reading all the technical section on here. Regards, Martyn  

Good luck Martyn. I'm sure we'll all keep our ears to the ground and let you know if any likely boats pop up for sale.  

Steven Palmer

afternoon, sorry to drag up a old thread. i have searched for this article and can only find part of it. Does anyone by chance have a copy as i would be interested in reading it thanks steve  

Barry Voysey

Barry Voysey

For anyone who is interested I have a Sailing Today test article on the Moody 31 from 1999. PM me your email and I will send you the PDF  

Jürgen Roth

Hi Jurgen, Your boat is beautifully maintained and the video is beautifully made - well done! Peter. p.s. Of Dick Durham's statements all those years ago, "sails like a dinghy" is imho a great comp;liment to any yacht and a 31 footer that sails like a dinghy deserves a tiller, regardless of the comfort of the aft berth, so I believe you were right to revert to tiller steering. P.  

Hi Peter, sorry for the late reply. Thanks for the nice reply to my post. I am still in the middle of refurbishing and refitting but aren´t we all? Replaced the pantry worktop laminat yesterday.....insulated the hull behind of the pantry.... I totally agree to the "sails like a dinghy" compliment. Though she does not sail like a dinghy, I was and still am amazed about the maneuverability and the lightness of helm. I admit, i was a bit concerned about weather helm prior to removing the steering pedestal, but that proved to be no problem at all. I am looking forward to the season 2021..... kind regards Jürgen  

Roger Smith

Roger Smith

I'm very late to this thread. Dick Durham lives near me - I've spoken to him in the pub a couple of times. Just after this review came out I saw Dick waiting for a bus (with his kit, off to collect his new gaffer) and I was just about to ask him about the review when the bus turned up! I just think that he got his reviews/memory muddled up and he was talking about a different boat.  

Barry Voysey said: For anyone who is interested I have a Sailing Today test article on the Moody 31 from 1999. PM me your email and I will send you the PDF Click to expand...

Francis Miller

Tim Bowden said: Hi Barry, I would be interested in a copy of the ST article if possible. [email protected] thanks. Click to expand...

Moody 31 - Buying a Moody 31

Francis Miller said: Hi Tim, Its in the Moody 31Tech Lib, also published in an earlier thread, Moody 31 - Buying a Moody 31 Hi Folks Around the year 2000, we had a dream of selling our house and buying a sailing boat. My Wife shortly after became pregnant, we had children, and our lives got tipped upside down. A boat was no place for the pitter patter of tiny feet, so that was the end of that. Funny, I'd forgotten... moodyowners.info For the record, a great boat, solid, sails well and is dependable, capable and reassuring when the wind rises. I am of course a tad biased as I sail a Mk 11 Click to expand...

Hi Francis, Is your Mkll a fin or a bilge keel? Do you have any feedback on the bilge version? Regards Tim  

She's a 1990 Bilge Keeler that spends most of her time in a half tide harbour. For cruising the Bristol channel, I would not contemplate a fin Keeler as most opportunities to shelter are in tidal harbours, allowing a bilge Keeler to dry out without too many concerns. I've not sailed a fin keel version, possibly it would point a little higher and show a slightly better turn of speed, but my experience with the bilge keels is totally positive. Our boat, fitted with an aftermarket mast roller reefing system, stands up well to the sails and I've not experienced any slamming that can sometime be associated with BKs. I normally sail singlehanded, even if the family are aboard! As all the lines are led back to the cockpit, it make easier and safer sailing. I sailed her from West Wales down to the Isles of Scilly last September. For most of the hundred and twenty mile transit I had NW winds ranging between 25-35kts, according to the B&G. The boat coped without issue, and at no time did it give me any cause for concern. It would not be my yacht of choice for a transatlantic crossing, but would willingly follow in the wake of other Moody 31's that have. If you have any specific questions, please do ask, if I can't answer, there will be someone here who will know.  

Francis Miller said: She's a 1990 Bilge Keeler that spends most of her time in a half tide harbour. For cruising the Bristol channel, I would not contemplate a fin Keeler as most opportunities to shelter are in tidal harbours, allowing a bilge Keeler to dry out without too many concerns. I've not sailed a fin keel version, possibly it would point a little higher and show a slightly better turn of speed, but my experience with the bilge keels is totally positive. Our boat, fitted with an aftermarket mast roller reefing system, stands up well to the sails and I've not experienced any slamming that can sometime be associated with BKs. I normally sail singlehanded, even if the family are aboard! As all the lines are led back to the cockpit, it make easier and safer sailing. I sailed her from West Wales down to the Isles of Scilly last September. For most of the hundred and twenty mile transit I had NW winds ranging between 25-35kts, according to the B&G. The boat coped without issue, and at no time did it give me any cause for concern. It would not be my yacht of choice for a transatlantic crossing, but would willingly follow in the wake of other Moody 31's that have. If you have any specific questions, please do ask, if I can't answer, there will be someone here who will know. Click to expand...

Tim, I don’t know if you realise but the 31 and the S31 are completely different boats, hull, rig, layout, everything.  

Hello Dick, thanks very much for your wisdom. Barry has been most helpful, and I appreciate we have three different vessels of 31’ (Mk1, Mk2 and S). Any counsel on the relative merits of the S31 relative to the Hunter Channel 31 are most welcome, though I don’t want to overuse the goodwill of members, or abuse the temporary permissions.  

Hi Tim, The M31 Mk 1 & Mk 2 are different incarnations of the same boat - in sailing terms, they are the same, but there are some relatively minor differences in the accomodation. The M S31 is a completely different boat which sails even better than the M31 and has much more accomodation, basically it's a bigger boat if the same length. There was an option with the S31 to have a fractional rig.T he Moody S31 is, in my view, a better sailer than the Hunter Channel 31 with far better accomodation. For details of the layout of all models of Moody, see the Moody Archive, accessed from a link towards the bottom of the left hand side of the MOA Homepage. To get to the Homepage click on the burgee at the top of this page. Peter.  

Peter Wright said: Hi Tim, The M31 Mk 1 & Mk 2 are different incarnations of the same boat - in sailing terms, they are the same, but there are some relatively minor differences in the accomodation. The M S31 is a completely different boat which sails even better than the M31 and has much more accomodation, basically it's a bigger boat if the same length. There was an option with the S31 to have a fractional rig.T he Moody S31 is, in my view, a better sailer than the Hunter Channel 31 with far better accomodation. For details of the layout of all models of Moody, see the Moody Archive, accessed from a link towards the bottom of the left hand side of the MOA Homepage. To get to the Homepage click on the burgee at the top of this page. Peter. Click to expand...

Austin Flynn

Hi All, I have a Moody 31. She is a good solid boat with great sea keeping qualities. I am based in the south coast of Ireland I have circumnavigated Ireland and sailed to Scotland and the south of England In her. A sister ship in our club has voyaged to Norway Sweden and Finland without any loss of confidence in the boat. I am seventy one and am happy to be considered young by Dick Durham. Regards Austin  

When you get to my age, and Dick's about the same vintage, mostnof the world look young. Peter.  

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One hundred and fifty years of experience, coupled with unmatched excellence in design and manufacturing. It is qualities like these that have made Moody one of the most illustrious names in the sailing yacht world. Over many generations, Moody has developed an exemplary boat building culture culminating in its current range of deck saloon yachts.

Moody bridges British maritime heritage with outstanding German craftsmanship. Commitment to superior quality, steadfast seaworthiness, modern technologies, and unmatched comfort aboard each sailing yacht: that is what Moody stands for.

With passion, precision and thoroughness, each Moody is carefully finished by our highly motivated team. Only after it has been tested at sea to ensure it meets our rigorous standards, does a new Moody go into series production. This is ensured by our dedicated team of developers, designers and professional craftsmen.

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Combining British maritime heritage and German craftsmanship, Moody yachts stand for luxury on the seas. They are easy to sail, uncompromisingly seaworthy and built to last.

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Moody Decksaloon 41

The Ultimate Package

What the DS41 offers is seemingly impossible in a yacht of this size but Bill Dixon and Moody have achieved it.

An owner's suite from a 50 footer, a spacious ensuite guest cabin, which you would be very proud to show your friends into and an equipment/machinery inventory, which simply shouldn't be available at this size.

An easily managed but powerful sail plan to make passage making fast and effortless, plus of course the Deck Saloon's unique feature of a full 360-degree panoramic view from inside when the sailing day is over.

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The All-Weather Concept

Weather conditions can surprise a sailor – but not with the Moody DS41. Thanks to its comprehensive, high-quality equipment, you will be ready for anything. 

A protected inside helm is located on the port side of the deck saloon. Sail to the place of your dreams, whether north or south. 

The DS41 can be equipped with a heating system or air conditioning in accordance with your wishes.

Choose Every Aspect

Design something that is unique and full of character from the customisable equipment options. 

Craft the interior from a choice of exquisite materials and elegant colours. 6 choices for the furniture and flooring, over 30 upholstery options and much more to help you create your perfect space.

Pinpoint your yacht's sailing characteristics, from the sailcloth right down to the keel. Configure your onboard equipment – including the engine, sound system and navigation instruments.

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Interior Space & Light

The interior of the DS41 exudes modern, warm minimalism and offers a generous amount of space everywhere. 

The cosy U-shaped sofa with the large saloon table and the linear galley creates a spacious ambience in the living area. 

Added to this are the cleverly integrated stowage spaces. The extra-large three-door wardrobe in the owner's cabin is a masterstroke.

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Moody Boat Archive

Yachting Monthly

  • Digital edition

Yachting Monthly cover

  • Duncan Kent
  • January 29, 2015

We take a closer look at the Moody 42 and see what she's all about

Product Overview

  • - Easy to sail singlehanded
  • - Comfortable on long passages
  • - Ample deck area
  • - Restricted cockpit visibility

Manufacturer:

Price as reviewed:.

  • What’s she like to sail?

The Moody 42 was designed for long-distance cruising, so she is solidly constructed and simply but stoutly rigged. Her high displacement and sail area/displacement ratio put her firmly in the cruiser bracket. Her displacement to waterline comparison is more favourable performance-wise than the earlier Moody 40, but still means she is stiff and well able to stand up to her sail. Her ballast ratio is not as high as some, but putting the greater part of the cast- iron ballast in a bulb at the keel foot means it is more effective.

See what happens when Duncan Kent takes a Moody 42 for a cruise down the Solent

She is easy to sail singlehanded as all the sail controls are within easy reach of the helmsman. The cockpit, however, is a long way above sea level and the genoa is large and low-cut, so visibility forward from the cockpit is severely restricted. The semi-balanced rudder keeps the helm light but positive and the half skeg increases the integrity and strength of the rudder mounting.

She is an easy and satisfying yacht to sail, so long as you’re not expecting her to be a flyer in light airs. Where she makes up for it is in her ability to keep powering on in heavy seas and to stand up to her sail plan, even when you let her become slightly over-canvassed. She also has a gentle motion at sea, making living aboard her on long passages safe, secure and comfortable.

Moody 42

The layout of the interior on the Moody 42

  • What’s she like in port and at anchor?

Her foredeck is flat and uncluttered, and she has twin, self-stowing anchor bow rollers, which are essential if you want to weather out a gale on the hook. She also has a powerful electric windlass and a deep anchor chain locker with enough space for at least 60m (196ft) of heavy chain and a further 20m (65ft) of warp. The headsail furling drum is a foot or so above the deck, well clear of the anchor, and her slightly overhanging bow helps protect her stem when retrieving the ground tackle.

The deck area is ample and uncluttered – especially the afterdeck, where there’s room to sunbathe, shower or inflate a dinghy. Gates in the guardrails and two deep steps give good access to the water and the steps are wide enough to stand and shower on safely. She also has a deep, fold-down boarding ladder.

You won’t get more than four in the cockpit comfortably, or six if two sit behind the wheel, but below decks her saloon is roomy enough to cater for six dining or eight for a relaxing drink.

Moody 42

Keel design of the Moody 42

  • Would she suit you and your crew?

The Moody 42 is a big boat – both in interior volume and displacement terms. She’s equally suited to coastal family cruising or more ambitious blue water work. She’s very comfortable to live on, both under way and at anchor, and there’s enough room for all the long-term cruising essentials such as a generator, inverter, watermaker, hot water tank, extra batteries, dive gear, kedges, dinghy and so on, without having to lash stuff to the rails.

For those who like a good-size, dedicated navigation station with bags of room for displays and instruments, the Moody 42 certainly cuts the mustard.

If you like to feel safe and secure in all weathers and are not interested in chasing others around the cans on a Sunday morning, then this boat could be the one for you.

If the price tag is a little too scary, then the earlier Moody 40, or even the Moody 38 (not the 38S) might be the answer. Both are equally well built and luxurious – just a little smaller.

Moody 42

FACTS AND FIGURES

Guide price: £90,000 – £125,000 LOA: 12.8m (42ft 2in) LWL: 10.6m (34ft 10in) Beam: 4.0m (13ft 3in) Draught: 1.5/1.8m (4ft 11in/6ft 1in) Displacement: 10,520kg (23,144 lb) Ballast: 3,149kg (6,927 lb) Genoa: 43.8m2 (471sqft) Mainsail: (in-mast) 33.2m2 (352sq ft) Engine: 56hp Yanmar Fuel: 274 litres (60 gal) Water: 364 litres (80 gal) Ballast ratio: 30% Sail area displacement ratio: 16 Designer: Bill Dixon Builder: Marine Projects, Plymouth Class Association: www.moodyowners.net

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Moody Aft Cockpit 41

The Moody AC41 took traditional yacht-building into the modern era, combining a classic flat superstructure with comfortable handling and exclusive on-board luxury . The yacht has been designed for speedy yet comfortable cruising, but it is just as ideally equipped for marina life, short hops along the coast and long voyages.

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IMAGES

  1. Yacht Test Moody DS 41

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  2. Moody Segelyachten

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  3. Moody DS 41 triumphs at the British Yachting Awards 2020

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  4. Moody sailing yachts

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  5. Moody 41DS review: Could this model win you over to the decksaloon

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  6. Test af Moody 41 DS fra Hanse Yachts

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VIDEO

  1. Moody 45DS breaks the mould of sailing boats with YM

  2. Moody 376

  3. Moody 27

  4. Pointer 30 yacht test

  5. Moody 376

  6. Moody 62 DS 2012

COMMENTS

  1. Moody 41DS review: Could this model win you over to the decksaloon

    Verdict. It's fascinating to see how Bill Dixon and Moody have developed the decksaloon yacht since the Eclipse range of the 1980s and 1990s. The changes in 30 years are quite remarkable. As for ...

  2. Moody 41 DS: A deck saloon that pushes all boundaries

    Acres of space. In addition to being one of the few single-hulled sailing yachts in her size range to adopt the one-level approach, the Moody 41 DS draws attention to herself in a number of ways. The hard-top has an opening centre section and extends seamlessly from the deck saloon to just forward of the wheels. Credit: David Harding.

  3. Moody 36 MkII: a centre-cockpit cruiser that's practical and fun

    The later Moody 36, built by Marine Projects in Plymouth, is a contemporary-looking yacht that has stood the test of time. During surveys I have found fairly large blisters on the topsides on several boats, mainly around the portside anchor locker drain but these are from delamination rather than osmosis.

  4. Our verdict on the Moody 36

    The Moody 36 is also easy to sail singlehanded, with all the sail control lines and winches within easy reach in the compact cockpit, and you're not going to get shoulder cramps if you have to hand-steer her for hours on end, either. Nor are you going to become bruised and battered if the seas come up when you're working at the galley ...

  5. but is this really only 41ft? The new Moody 41DS

    As they have been doing since the 1980s, Moody and Bill Dixon once again redefine what's possible on a deck saloon cruising monohull. Wait till you see the s...

  6. Moody 54 DS Sea Trial: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

    Moody 54 DS - Sea Trial. The sail plan of the Moody DS is simple and compact, the mainsail is furling, tri-radial with vertical sticks and measures 81.50 square meters; the jib is self-tacking, highly practical and measures 65 square meters. Optional equipment includes a 135% genoa and a gennaker/Code 0 which can be installed on the bow plate ...

  7. Boat Review: Moody 45DS

    Moody Yachts were built in Swanwick, England, on the banks of the Hamble River from the middle of the 18th century into the early years of the 21st, and Bill Dixon has been designing Moody's cruising boats since 1981. ... But in perfect test conditions—10-12 knots of breeze, flat water and sunny skies on Narragansett Bay—the hull cut a ...

  8. Moody DS48 : First pictures from the exclusive YACHT test

    It is all the more astonishing that the Moody, which displaces a good 24 tonnes, can be set in motion at all. Heeling or significant rudder pressure are not to be expected in these conditions, but as soon as the sails are conveniently unfurled at the touch of a button and the jib is stopped, the imposing yacht pushes itself across the Greifswald Bodden as if by magic.

  9. Moody DS 41: The smallest Moody in the YACHT test

    With the Moody DS 41, Hanseyachts has launched its smallest deck saloon yacht with an inside steering position. It is a mixture of sailboat, motorboat and catamaran

  10. PDF Moody Aft Cockpit test review Sailing Today June 09

    NEW BOAT TEST MOODY 41 CLASSIC With a modern hull form and retro interior, the Moody 41 Classic is the first in a brand new range of German-built cruising yachts, which promises the best of both worlds. Duncan Kent finds out if it's a recipe for success. 72

  11. Moody S38: a good all-round family cruising boat

    Looking for a good all-round family cruising boat with a good turn of speed, there are plenty of strong contenders, including the Moody S38. An obvious sheer and high topsides make the Moody S38 a dry boat, while the beam carried aft boosts performance. Credit: Duncan Kent. Product: Moody S38: a good all-round family cruising boat. Manufacturer:

  12. Moody Unveils DS48: A New Dimension in Bluewater Yachting

    5 January 2024. 722 2 minutes read. Moody introduces the DS48 - a medium-sized bluewater yach t designed to meet the most discerning needs. Following the success of its predecessors, the award-winning DS41 and DS54, the DS48 continues the Mood y legacy with its expansive saloon offering a panoramic 360-degree view of the surroundings.

  13. Moody Decksaloon 45

    The Moody DS45 is designed to make sailing a pleasure. The self-tacking jib ensures easy and safe handling for a small crew, supported by powerful winches. The yacht can be simply manoeuvred from the helm station, with all sails easily adjustable from the helmsman's position. Everyone onboard this yacht will feel totally safe thanks to the ...

  14. Moody 33, Moody 36 and Moody 39 review

    The Moody 39 is much more spacious with a full double cabin. Between the saloon and forecabin there's an extra cabin, with twin bunks and plenty of standing and stowage space, plus a spacious heads compartment. While the aft cabin of the 33, was entirely separated from the rest of the accommodation, the 39 has a walk through and the cabin is ...

  15. Moody 31 MkII Yachting monthly review

    Boat type Moody 36(90s) Cruising area East Coast France Belgium Holland. 16/5/20 ... For anyone who is interested I have a Sailing Today test article on the Moody 31 from 1999. PM me your email and I will send you the PDF . J. Jürgen Roth Jürgen Roth. Member. Boat name VAIANA Berth Rendsburg Boat type Moody 31

  16. Live aboard offshore luxury blue water sailing yachts

    Four sailboat models are currently available - the most recent being the Moody DS41, which will be unveiled in January 2020 at the BOOT trade fair in Düsseldorf. This model complements the two deck saloon yachts, the Moody DS45 and DS54 both perfect for blue water live aboard cruising. Moody was acquired by HanseYachts AG in 2007. Decksaloon 41.

  17. Moody Decksaloon 41

    The interior of the DS41 exudes modern, warm minimalism and offers a generous amount of space everywhere. The cosy U-shaped sofa with the large saloon table and the linear galley creates a spacious ambience in the living area. Added to this are the cleverly integrated stowage spaces. The extra-large three-door wardrobe in the owner's cabin is a ...

  18. Moody Eclipse 33 review

    Moody Eclipse 33 review. See the November 2015 issue of Yachting Monthly for the full test. What's she like to sail? At first glance you think she's going to perform like a typical motorsailer, dogged but slow. Take a more studied look at her hull shape - waterline, stem entry, narrow shoulders and so on - and you begin to wonder.

  19. Moody Boat Archive

    GRP Sailing yachts and Motor yachts built by, marketed by, or fitted out by A. H. Moody & Son Ltd: Moody Halberdier 36 Moody Cavalier 36 Moody Trawler 36 (Motor Yacht) Moody 379 Moody Grenadier 119 Moody Lancer 42 (Motor Yacht) Moody 42 Aft Cockpit (circa 1980) Moody 42 Centre Cockpit (circa 1980) Moody 44 (circa 1970's) Moody Grenadier 134

  20. Moody boats for sale

    Some of the most iconic Moody models now listed include: 54 DS, 346, Decksaloon 54, 376 and 54. Various Moody models are currently offered for sale by specialized yacht brokers, dealers and brokerages on YachtWorld, with listings ranging from 1974 year models up to 2025. Used Moody. New Moody. Find Moody boats for sale in your area & across the ...

  21. Moody 42

    The Moody 42 was designed for long-distance cruising, so she is solidly constructed and simply but stoutly rigged. Her high displacement and sail area/displacement ratio put her firmly in the cruiser bracket. Her displacement to waterline comparison is more favourable performance-wise than the earlier Moody 40, but still means she is stiff and ...

  22. Moody 41 Aft Cockpit

    Moody Aft Cockpit 41. The Moody AC41 took traditional yacht-building into the modern era, combining a classic flat superstructure with comfortable handling and exclusive on-board luxury . The yacht has been designed for speedy yet comfortable cruising, but it is just as ideally equipped for marina life, short hops along the coast and long voyages.