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Gray Ghost Organ Pipe (Stenocereus Pruinosus) Ultimate Care Guide

Modified: Jul 11, 2022 by Tarah Schwartz · This post may contain affiliate links ·

The Stenocereus Pruinosus succulent is also known by its common name of Gray Ghost Organ Pipe. In addition, it has numerous other biological names, such as Cactus Pruinosus, Cereus Roridus, and Stenocereus Longispinus.

Two Stenocereus Pruinosus in a orange pots.

This is an unusual cactus plant, found growing in the wild in certain areas of Mexico. It is commonly found in the states of Oaxaca, Veracruz, and Puebla, where it flourishes at high altitudes.

Being used to an altitude of between 2500 and 3000 feet, it will do well in hot, arid conditions with a dry climate.

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Stenocereus Pruinosus Appearance

Caring for the stenocereus pruinosus, temperature, propagating the stenocereus pruinosus, common pests and problems with the stenocereus pruinosus, insect infestation, overwatering, repotting the stenocereus pruinosus.

The Stenocereus Pruinosus was given its nickname of Gray Ghost Organ Pipe because of its grayish-green color. This cactus plant is more like a tree than a shrub. It grows vertically, extending upwards, rather than along the ground.

It has a central columnar trunk that is thick and sturdy, with smaller branches that extend upwards from its sides. It resembles a candelabra in shape. Because it grows fairly rapidly, it can eventually develop many new branches.

The Stenocereus Pruinosus is a relatively big cactus. In its natural habitat in the wild, it can reach a height of about 18-20 feet, with a width of about 10 feet. When cultivated as a garden plant, it is usually a lot smaller, reaching a maximum height of about 6 feet.

However, if you plant this succulent outdoors and give it a lot of space, in the right conditions it can reach almost the same dimensions as it does in the wild. When it is given the right amount of water and direct sunlight, it can reach an impressive 16-18 feet in your garden.

The young Stenocereus Pruinosus plant has between 5 and 8 deep ribs along each trunk. These deep ribs have spines that start out in varying shades of brown, and sometimes light red. Eventually, the ribs tend to flatten out, and they lose their deep color, turning pale green or white.

The Stenocereus Pruinosus is quite unusual in the way it blooms. It develops a small purple and white flower, shaped like a funnel and between 2.5 and 3.5 inches wide. The flowers usually emerge from the tips of the stems.

With most plants, the flowers open during the day, because of their response to sunlight, and close at night. The flowers of the Stenocereus Pruinosus do the opposite. They open early in the evening, as the sun is setting. They remain open throughout the night, and close almost completely during the day, remaining only very slightly open during daylight hours.

This cactus bears an oval-shaped fruit that is about 3 inches in length. The fruit ranges in color from yellow to orange and occasionally even purple. The fruit is edible but has a sharp, sour flavor.

Three Gray Ghost Organ Pipes in a black pots.

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The Stenocereus Pruinosus is not a difficult plant to cultivate. It does not need much attention or care. As long as its needs for sufficient sunlight and the right amount of water are met, it should thrive without much nurturing.

The Stenocereus Pruinosus is used to a lot of direct natural sunlight. If you are planting this succulent in your garden, choose a spot that gets about 6 hours of direct sunlight per day, with some dappled shade from surrounding trees and shrubs.

Although the Stenocereus Pruinosus is more suited to being planted outdoors because of its large size, it can also be grown in a pot and kept as an indoor house plant . The pot will contain the spread of the roots, and restrict the growth of the plant.

When cultivating this succulent as an indoor plant, select a room in your house that faces the sun and gets lots of direct natural light. If you are in the northern hemisphere, this would usually be a south-facing room, where your Stenocereus Pruinosus will be quite happy on a sunny window sill.

If you do not have a room with sufficient sunlight, it is possible to supplement the natural light by means of a grow light. This is an electric light designed specifically for horticultural purposes.

1 Stenocereus Pruinosis Pitaya Pipe Cactus Columnar Starter Plant

  • 1 Stenocereus Pruinosis Pitaya Pipe Cactus Columnar Starter Plant
  • Columnar cactus becoming tall, dark green but glaucous-gray with age, with 4-6 ribs and few blackish spines. A native of...

Cultivo in vitro “Alternativas Sustentables”: Cultivo in vitro de Pachycereus schottii y Stenocereus pruinosus, cactáceas con reporte de actividad biológica importane (Spanish Edition)

  • Rodríguez G., Ramón G. (Author)
  • Spanish (Publication Language)
  • 104 Pages - 02/14/2017 (Publication Date) - Editorial Académica Española (Publisher)

All plants need a certain amount of natural light in order to undergo the process of photosynthesis, whereby they produce chlorophyll, which feeds and nourishes the plant. Without sufficient chlorophyll, the plant will die.

The grow light mimics natural light, allowing the plant to continue to produce enough chlorophyll through the process of photosynthesis. These lights are readily available at most garden centers and nurseries.

ghost organ pipe cactus

The Stenocereus Pruinosus is a desert cactus, native to very dry areas. Therefore it is quite drought resistant and does not need much water in order to survive.

This succulent is dormant through the winter months, during which time it only needs to be watered very occasionally.

During its growth period, through the spring and summer seasons, it needs a little more water. It should be watered once a week to every 10 days. Water deeply, allowing the plant to absorb sufficient water through its roots.

After watering, the Stenocereus Pruinosus should be left until the soil has dried completely before being watered again. There is a danger of overwatering. If the soil is constantly damp, the roots may start to rot. This can be very harmful to the plant.

In order to test if the plant needs to be watered, insert a long wooden skewer into the surrounding soil. If it is completely dry when removed, it is safe to water. But if it is still slightly damp, wait a day or two before checking again.

If you are planting your Stenocereus Pruinosus in a pot, always ensure that the pot has good drainage holes at the bottom, so that excess water can run off freely.

Like most other species of cactus, the Stenocereus Pruinosus is used to a hot climate, due to conditions in its native areas. It likes heat. It is not very cold hardy, and will not be able to survive temperatures below 25° Fahrenheit.

The Stenocereus Pruinosus should only be planted outdoors in areas that have very mild winters. It cannot tolerate icy temperatures where the ground freezes. If you live in an area with a colder climate, it is advisable to plant your Stenocereus Pruinosus in containers that can be brought indoors during severe weather.

This succulent should not be exposed to frost. The ice crystals will settle on the leaves and cause them to freeze. They will turn soft and limp. It is very difficult to revive them after such exposure.

If frost is expected overnight, your Stenocereus Pruinosus should either be taken indoors or covered lightly with a loose piece of cloth to protect it from the ice.

If your Stenocereus Pruinosus is an indoor plant, it should be kept in a room with a constantly warm temperature. It does not like sudden, drastic changes in temperature. The ideal temperature is between 65°-80°.

The Stenocereus Pruinosus will do well in most soil types. The pH level of the soil is not terribly important, as long as it is not too extreme. This succulent will grow well as long as the soil pH is anything between 5.7 - 7.7.

It is more important to ensure that the soil is well-aerated. This will help to facilitate good drainage in the soil. When soil particles are too thick, they tend to stick together in thick clumps, preventing water from running off.

If excess water is not able to drain away adequately, the soil will eventually become waterlogged. This will result in the roots being constantly wet, causing them to rot. Root rot can potentially kill your succulent.

The soil should be made up of a combination of cactus potting soil and mineral grit, in a ratio of 1:1. The mineral grit will help to prevent the soil particles from clumping together and retaining water.

Mineral grit is available from most garden centers and nurseries. There are 3 main types of mineral grit. You can use any of the following three substances, or a combination of all three.

  • Coarse sand

This is sand that is made up of coarse granules, which allow for air to filter between the individual grains of sand. As a result, water is able to flow freely through the sand. When mixed with cactus potting soil, coarse sand is an excellent medium for good drainage.

Pumice consists of tiny particles of natural stone that have been ground and processed into a fine sand-like substance. Because it is non-absorbent, water flows freely around the particles of pumice. When combined with cactus potting soil, pumice provides an effective channel for excess water to drain away.

The volcanic minerals that are the basis for perlite are known to have a high water content. In combination with cactus potting soil, perlite assists effectively with water drainage, while also helping to keep the roots of the plant hydrated.

It can also be beneficial to mix in some leaf mulch with the soil. Leaf mulch helps the soil to maintain a good moisture balance, reducing the need for frequent watering.

If you mix leaf mulch in with the soil, it can help to inhibit the growth of weeds around your succulent. This can make a significant difference to the overall health of your plant, as you will not need to use weedkillers and herbicides as often. These can sometimes affect the surrounding plants, which should be avoided.

Leaf mulch basically consists of dead leaves. The dead leaves are full of nutrients that are essential for healthy plant growth, so adding them to the soil can help to nourish the plant. Leaf mulch is also useful in preventing soil erosion around your succulents.

While it is not essential to feed your Stenocereus Pruinosus with fertilizer, it will help to boost its growth if you give it some fertilizer in carefully measured doses. The best fertilizer to use is one that is designed specifically for cactus plants. There are many different brands available.

When applying the fertilizer, it should be diluted in equal parts with water and administered to your Stenocereus Pruinosus once every 2 months.

This succulent should only be given fertilizer during the growing period, in the spring and summer months. It should not be administered to the plant during its dormant period throughout winter.

If you follow all of the above guidelines for caring for your Stenocereus Pruinosus, It should grow fairly rapidly. If it is in a pot, it will need to be repotted regularly. See our guide for repotting towards the end of this article.

Gray Ghost Organ Pipe close-up.

The best method to use for propagating the Stenocereus Pruinosus is by taking a stem cutting. When cutting a piece off, always use a clean, sharp scissors or a knife.

If your utensil has dirt on it, you risk introducing bacteria to both the offcut and the mother plant. This can cause infection in the plant. If the cutting becomes infected, it will fail to take and you will not be able to grow a new plant from it.

If your knife or scissors are not sharp enough, it will be difficult to make a quick, clean cut. You may have to hack at the stem, which will damage both the mother plant and the cutting, affecting their growth.

To propagate the Stenocereus Pruinosus from a cutting, follow this step-by-step guide.

  • Cut a healthy-looking stem, as close to the base as possible.
  • Allow it to dry for a few days until a callus has formed over the cut edge.
  • Insert the callused cutting in a pot of prepared soil.
  • Gently compact the soil around the cutting, using the palms of your hands to flatten the soil evenly around the base.
  • Leave it to settle for a few hours, then give it a light sprinkling of water.
  • Continue to water lightly every 2-3 days, until it has taken and is growing well.
  • You can then start to gradually reduce the watering schedule, according to the watering guidelines given above.

Gray Ghost Organ Pipe clsoe-up.

When cultivating the Stenocereus Pruinosus, the most common problems that you are likely to encounter are insect infestation and overwatering.

Like most other succulent plants, the Stenocereus Pruinosus is prone to infestation by mealybugs. These tiny insects are serious pests that can cause severe damage to your plant over a period of time.

It is important to check your cactus plants regularly for mealybug infestation. The insects are so small that you will not notice them immediately. However, they leave a distinct tell-tale sign of their presence.

If you see a fine, white powdery substance on the underside of your plant, it is most likely infested with mealybug. If you look carefully in the folds and crevices at the joins, you will see the actual insects.

There are many organic remedies that people recommend, but the only really effective method of eliminating these pests completely is by using a commercial pesticide. If you do not eliminate them fully, they will keep coming back and will continue to devour your plant.

Many people assume that too little water will eventually kill a plant. While this is usually true, succulents are far more likely to suffer damage from too much water than from too little water. The Stenocereus Pruinosus is used to dry conditions, and cannot tolerate an excess of water.

In order to prevent problems caused by overwatering, it is recommended to follow the watering guidelines given above.

When planting the Stenocereus Pruinosus in a container, it is vital that the container should have adequate drainage holes at the bottom. If there are insufficient holes, water will not be able to escape.

If the succulent’s roots are constantly left to sit in wet soil, they will start to rot. Root rot will eventually kill the plant.

If you suspect that your plant has developed root rot, it might still be possible to save the plant if you catch it early enough. If the leaves or stems are starting to go soft, and the plant is looking limp and weak, the roots could be rotting.

Carefully remove the plant from the pot, and shake off all soil that remains around the roots. If the roots look like they are turning black, they are starting to rot.

Using a clean, sharp knife, carefully cut away the blackened parts of the roots and rinse the healthy roots with clean and fresh water. Wash the pot out well to remove any traces of fungus and repot the plant in new, clean soil.

Stenocereus Pruinosus close-up.

The Stenocereus Pruinosus is a fast-growing cactus. If you have planted it in a container, it will need to be repotted at least every two years. If you want to encourage growth and allow it to get really big, it can be repotted annually.

  • Knowing when to repot

When small root hairs start to become visible through the drainage holes at the bottom of the pot, the plant is starting to outgrow the pot and needs to be given more space.

Roots emerging through the surface of the soil around the base of the plant are another indication that the plant is getting too big for its container and needs to be given more space.

  • What type of pot to use

Metallic containers such as those made of cast iron or tin will eventually start to rust. The mineral constituents in the soil can be affected by rust, and this can damage the plant.

Ceramic pots, or plastic containers, will not rust or cause any changes to the mineral balance in the soil. Therefore it is preferable to use ceramic or plastic containers.

  • Selecting the pot size

The roots of the Stenocereus Pruinosus tend to remain fairly shallow. They do not need deep soil. It is advisable to use a pot that is not too deep, to start off with.

The pot should be just the right size to contain your succulent comfortably but snugly.

While it may be tempting to use a larger pot in order to save yourself the effort of repotting as the plant grows, this is not recommended. If your plant is in a bigger pot, you may fall into the trap of overwatering, which can be fatal.

It also does not look very nice if the pot is too large for the plant. It is far more aesthetically appealing to have harmony between plant size and container size.

  • Protecting your hands from the thorns

The little thorns on the Stenocereus Pruinosus can be very painful, particularly if they pierce your skin. They are also very prickly to the touch and can make it very uncomfortable to handle the plant.

When repotting your Stenocereus Pruinosus , it is essential to use something to protect your hands. Thick gardening gloves that cannot be penetrated by the thorns are recommended.

If you do not have gardening gloves, you should use an old towel or a piece of thick fabric to wrap gently around the plant in order to handle it without getting thorns stuck in your hands.

  • A step-by-step guide to repotting
  • Fill the new container up to halfway with potting soil mix.
  • Carefully place the plant in the pot.
  • Fill the pot to the top with potting soil, compacting it gently with your hands. The roots should be completely covered
  • Leave the plant to stand for a few hours before you water it.
  • The first time that you water your newly potted Stenocereus Pruinosus, it is advisable only to water it very lightly, with a soft spray of water.
  • Allow the plant to settle fully by leaving it to stand, with no further handling, for the rest of the day.
  • The following day you can water your succulent more deeply, giving it a thorough soaking.
  • You can now keep following the watering guidelines given earlier in this article.
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Stenocereus pruinosus ‘Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus’

If you’re new to succulent care or are looking for an exciting addition to your plant collection, the Stenocereus pruinosus ‘Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus’ is an excellent choice. In this in-depth care guide, I’ll cover everything you need to know to grow and care for this unique succulent, from basic information to common issues and solutions.

Gray ghost organ pipe cactus care gray ghost organ pipe

The Basics ‘Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus’

The Stenocereus pruinosus ‘Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus’ is a columnar cactus with a striking appearance. Its gray-green stems are covered in numerous spines, giving it a ghostly look that sets it apart from other cacti. The plant produces large, white flowers with a sweet fragrance, adding to its charm.

Size and Growth Rate

‘Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus’ can reach up to 15 feet tall and 6 feet wide in its natural habitat, but when grown in a container, it typically stays much smaller, reaching around 4 to 5 feet tall. The growth rate of the ‘Gray Ghost Organ Pipe’ is slow to moderate, meaning you won’t need to worry about it outgrowing its space too quickly.

Natural Habitat and Adaptations

Stenocereus pruinosus ‘Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus’ is native to Puebla, Mexico, where it grows in arid regions with rocky or sandy soils. This cactus is well-adapted to its environment , as its shallow root system allows it to quickly absorb water after infrequent rains. The gray-green color of its stems provides camouflage in its natural habitat, helping it avoid predators.

Caring for Your ‘Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus’

As with most succulents, it’s crucial to avoid overwatering your ‘Gray Ghost Organ Pipe.’ Allow the soil to dry out completely between waterings, and then water thoroughly until water drains from the bottom of the pot. During the winter months, you can reduce your watering frequency, as the cactus enters a period of dormancy. I usually don’t even bother watering from like November to March unless we get an odd heat wave in San Diego.

‘Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus’ needs plenty of sunlight to thrive . Aim for at least 6 to 8 hours of direct sunlight each day, either outdoors or in a sunny windowsill. We recently had an unexpected (to me!) heatwave in San Diego and a few of my succulents and cacti got a little scorched on top, so I moved them under some shade cloth and they’re doing great now. If you’re growing your plant indoors, consider using a grow light to supplement natural light.

Fertilization

While not strictly necessary, fertilizing your Stenocereus pruinosus ‘Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus’ can help promote healthy growth. Use a balanced, water-soluble fertilizer diluted to half strength, and apply it once during the growing season (spring or summer).

Pruning your ‘Gray Ghost Organ Pipe’ isn’t typically necessary unless it becomes top-heavy or outgrows its space. To prune, carefully remove the unwanted stem using a sharp, sterilized knife or pruning shears, and allow the cut to callous over for a few days before repotting.

Dormancy and Cold Hardiness

Stenocereus pruinosus ‘Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus’ enters a period of dormancy during the winter months, requiring less water and cooler temperatures. This cactus is cold hardy down to about 25°F (-4°C), but it’s best to bring it indoors if temperatures in your area drop below freezing.

Gray ghost organ pipe cactus propagation gray ghost organ pipe

Propagation

Propagating your ‘Gray Ghost Organ Pipe’ is a simple process. Cut a healthy stem from the mother plant, allow the cut to callous over for a few days, and then plant the cutting in well-draining cactus soil. Water sparingly until roots begin to develop, and then care for the new plant as you would the parent.

Common Issues and Solutions

A common issue that many succulent enthusiasts face is dealing with pests. Mealybugs, scale insects, and spider mites are known to attack Stenocereus pruinosus ‘Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus’. To combat these pests, use insecticidal soap or neem oil, following the product’s instructions. If the infestation is severe, you may need to remove and discard the affected parts of the plant.

Other Common Problems

Overwatering is the most common issue when it comes to caring for Stenocereus pruinosus ‘Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus’. Signs of overwatering include yellowing , mushy stems, and root rot. To prevent this, ensure you are using a well-draining soil mix and only water when the soil is completely dry.

Frequently Asked Questions

Other common names.

The Stenocereus pruinosus ‘Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus’ is sometimes referred to as the ‘Gray Ghost Cactus’ or simply the ‘Gray Ghost.’

Can You Grow It Indoors?

Yes, you can grow Stenocereus pruinosus ‘Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus’ indoors, as long as you provide it with sufficient light. Place your cactus in a sunny windowsill or supplement natural light with a grow light to keep it healthy.

Toxicity to Cats, Dogs, and People

Stenocereus pruinosus ‘Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus’ is not known to be toxic to humans or pets. However, the spines can be sharp and may cause injury if touched. Keep your cactus out of reach from children and pets to avoid any accidents.

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The Stenocereus pruinosus ‘Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus’ is a unique and intriguing addition to any succulent collection. By following this comprehensive care guide, you’ll be well-equipped to grow and maintain a healthy, thriving cactus. Whether you’re just starting your succulent journey or are an experienced hobbyist, this cactus is sure to delight and challenge you in equal measure.

ghost organ pipe cactus

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Stenocereus pruinosus - Gray Ghost Organ Pipe

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Product Details

Gray Ghost Organ Pipe ( Stenocereus pruinosus ) (Buxbaum): Powdery blue-green columnar cactus from Mexico. In the wild, it can eventually grow to 20.0' with new branches sprouting from the base and trunk, but in cultivation it tends to stay under 6.0'. Young plants are deeply ribbed and have reddish brown spines, but with time the 5-8 ribs flatten and the spines turn white. When it blooms, it opens 2.0" to 3.5" white and magenta, funnel-shaped flowers in the night that stay slightly open during the day.

This cactus variety will not survive a hard frost, but if there is a risk of freezing temperatures it can be brought indoors to grow on a sunny window sill or under a grow light. Cactus need bright sunlight, great drainage, and infrequent water to prevent rot. Pick containers with drainage holes and use well-draining cactus and succulent soil with 70% to 80% mineral grit such as coarse sand, pumice, or perlite. Water deeply and wait for the soil to completely dry out before watering again.

Full Cactus Guide .

Product Size

Color - Primary

Grey / Silver

Color - Secondary

Green / Lime

Bloom Color

White Bloom

Cold Hardiness

Zone 10 (30F)

Recommended Light Conditions

Bright Indoor Light

Maximum Height

Growth Habit / Shape

Vertical Grower / Tall Stem

Special Characteristic

Showy Blooms

Hard to Kill

Slow Grower

USDA Zone map for average annual extreme minimum temperatures

THIS PLANT IS HARDY IN ZONES 10+

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Gardener's Path

How to Grow and Care for Organ Pipe Cactus

A horizontal image of a large organ pipe cactus growing in the desert surrounded by scrubby plants pictured on a blue sky background.

Stenocereus thurberi

Icon of the southwest, organ pipe cactus ( Stenocereus thurberi ) is one of the best known species of cacti in the United States.

Reaching up to 26 feet in height and 12 feet wide, this slow-growing, long-lived sun lover can be truly enormous.

Tough, tenacious, and armed to the teeth, this cactus is the perfect example of evolution’s elegant engineering.

A close up vertical image of a large organ pipe cactus (Stenocereus thurberi) growing in the desert pictured on a blue sky background. To the center and bottom of the frame is green and white printed text.

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Given scarce water, organ pipe can expand its stems and store water internally. In the blistering heat of its native range, this cactus protects itself with tough skin and bristling spines.

To keep its fragile flowers protected from the hot sun, S. thurberi blooms at night when it can also take advantage of the region’s pollinating bats.

Although this cactus is tailor-made for Mexico and the American Southwest’s harshest landscapes, northern gardeners, don’t despair!

Given plenty of sunlight and heat, some low-nutrient soil, and just a little water, organ pipe can be grown in a pot.

And for southern gardeners, given the right conditions, this cactus can thrive in gardens there, too.

Here’s a quick preview of everything you’ll learn as you read along:

What You’ll Learn

What is organ pipe cactus, cultivation and history.

  • Propagation
  • How to Grow

Growing Tips

Maintenance, where to buy, managing pests and disease, quick reference growing guide.

A member of the Cactaceae, or cactus family, the organ pipe cactus bears all the hallmarks of this spiny, spiky, desert-dwelling group.

Growing from a low trunk, it promptly branches out into tall, leggy stems, which look more like arms, or even tentacles, to us.

It’s this multi-limbed appearance that makes S. thurberi , with a bit of imagination, look like a multi-piped church organ and that gives it its common name.

A vertical image of a large mature organ pipe cactus (Stenocereus thurberi) growing wild in the desert.

The cactus’s common name in Spanish, pitaya dulce , is a nod to the sweet and juicy fruit, which – once you get past the needle-sharp spines – is juicy and saccharine. It tastes almost like watermelon.

Once the round fruit is ripe, it splits open to reveal red flesh and glossy, dark seeds. In the wild, these little propagules are disseminated far and wide by pack rats and other small animals.

Preceding the cactus’s edible fruit is the flower.

Tubular and pale purple to white in color, the blossoms come once a year during the rainy season. These are pollinated by bats and close once the hot sun rises.

Somewhat finicky about its climatic preferences, this cactus’s native range is relatively small.

In the United States it can only be found growing close to the Mexican border and almost exclusively within Organ Pipe National Monument lands in southwestern Arizona.

In Mexico, it grows in the northwest portion of the country.

A horizontal image of Stenocereus thurberi growing in the desert pictured in evening sunshine on a blue sky background.

Tolerant of light frost, but intolerant of hard freezes, almost all cacti in the northern part of this species’ range bear evidence of cold weather damage.

Evident as lumps and bumps in their otherwise straight stems, frost damage can be prevented by covering the plant’s tender growing tips with something like a cup or sheet. Heck, get creative!

If you are growing S. thurberi outside of the recommended USDA Hardiness Zones 9 to 11, make sure you plant it either in a pot or against a wall, large rock, cliff, or other structure that can radiate heat at night and protect it from frost.

Despite its disdain for southwestern winters, some attempts have been made to commercialize the sweetly cloying fruit in the US.

As most of the organ pipe cactus population is protected within Arizona’s national monument reserve, these attempts have mostly failed. The fruit is seasonably available in Mexico, however, where it’s used to make juices, candies, and more.

The fruit and wood of this species has historically been of tremendous significance to local native people living in the area. These groups used the fruit for sustenance and the wood for making fires.

Interestingly enough, the fossil record suggests the organ pipe cactus is a relative newcomer to the United States. About 3,500 years ago, as the climate gradually warmed, this cactus was able to leave the dry tropics and stake a claim in the Sonoran Desert.

Organ Pipe Cactus Propagation

It may seem a little intimidating to cultivate such a unique plant at home, especially one with relatively narrow growing parameters, but I assure you it can be done!

If you’re a cactus-growing rookie, cultivating S. thurberi from seed is not the method you’ll want to try first. If you have a little experience and want to give it a whirl, remember: when it comes to growing any kind of cacti, potting substrate is everything.

Start with a gritty, freely-draining potting soil specifically made for cacti. It should have a higher concentration of sand, pumice, gravel, perlite, or other additives that mimic the arid conditions of desert soils than your standard potting soil.

We have a DIY cactus potting mix recipe here .

Soak your little seeds for 24 hours prior to planting to encourage germination.

Plant two to three seeds on the surface of the soil in a four-inch pot. Next, cover the seeds with a very fine layer of grit.

The purpose of the grit is to hold the seed down so it doesn’t wash away with watering, not to cover the seeds completely. This species needs light to germinate.

Drench the soil thoroughly like a desert monsoon.

Place the pot in strong, indirect light where it will stay warm – think 80 to 90°F during the day, and about five to 10 degrees cooler at night. These seeds need warm temperatures for germination.

Spray the surface of the soil regularly with water so the seeds don’t dry out as they germinate. Germination should happen within a week or two.

Finally, and most importantly, have a little patience. Beyond germination, organ pipe is a notoriously slow grower, and conjuring this prickly plant from seed will take some time.

In about a year, you should have a teeny-tiny organ pipe cactus to transplant into a larger pot, or a suitable location outside. Make sure to water your young plant liberally, but infrequently, as it grows.

In about 35 years, you can look forward to your first bloom, if you can wait that long.

From Cuttings

Growing organ pipe from a cutting will yield a larger plant more quickly than starting from itty-bitty seeds.

Propagating cacti from cuttings can still be a challenging prospect for the novice gardener, so be prepared to stay alert for pests and disease as your little cactus grows.

A horizontal image of an organ pipe cactus growing in the desert pictured on a cloudy sky background.

Cactus cuttings grow best and most quickly when taken in the spring, but this can be done successfully at any time of year.

To grow organ pipe from a cutting, select a healthy, straight stem and cut approximately four inches off the growing tip using a very sharp, clean knife. Make the cut at a 45-degree angle to protect the stem of the parent plant from rot.

Allow the cutting to form a callus over the cut bottom. The newly severed part of the cactus will harden and turn grayish brown. This typically takes a few days.

Press the cutting firmly into cactus potting soil so that it stands up on its own. Water well. 

Place in full sun in a warm location. Do not cover with a plastic tent. Maintain dry, warm conditions to help prevent the cactus from rotting while it grows.

It will take about a month for small roots to form. Water well, but infrequently, about once a week.

From Seedlings/Transplanting

As ever, the most failsafe way to get a new plant growing in your garden or home is to buy one that’s already established.

S. thurberi is a relatively unfussy pot dweller and it has only a few basic requirements for growing indoors.

Make sure to transplant your newbie to a bigger pot with fresh cactus potting soil once you bring it home. Organ pipe cactus, along with most other cacti, appreciates an unglazed ceramic pot that will aid with drainage.

Learn more about pot and planter materials in our guide .

Water your cactus deeply, but infrequently. Approximately once a week should do it, but organ pipe will require even less moisture in the cooler, darker months of winter.

Always do a finger test before watering and make sure you feel that the soil has completely dried out first before watering again.

Place your cactus in the sunniest spot you’ve got. These plants ideally need a full eight hours of sun each day.

A close up horizontal image of large organ pipe cacti in full bloom pictured on a blue sky background.

If planting in the garden, make sure you’re in USDA Zones 9 to 11. Otherwise, you’re probably setting yourself up for disappointment.

In Zone 8, if you have a well-protected outdoor area up against a wall or large rock, you’re eligible to trial organ pipe outdoors, but make sure to protect it with a sheet or frost cloth if a hard frost is forecast.

Select a spot in full sun, with plenty of room to grow. Remember, these giants can get taller than 20 feet, given time.

Finally, make sure to amend the soil if necessary to ensure it is gravely, sandy, and freely draining. These cacti easily suffer from root rot if planted in soils that are too rich in organic matter, too deep, too wet, or too loamy.

Learn more about propagating cacti in our guide .

How to Grow Organ Pipe Cactus

In general, organ pipe cactus needs a little help through the fragile baby stage.

Beyond that, this species is robust and adaptable, as long as its basic growing conditions are met. So choose a sunny, warm spot and back away from that watering can!

A close up vertical image of the flower buds of an organ pipe cactus pictured in light sunshine.

Arid conditions, plenty of sunlight, and adequate heat are the triumvirate of requirements for thriving, happy organ pipes. This means site selection is everything.

Don’t ever forget that this plant is suited for USDA Zones 9 to 11.

If you live in Vermont, your organ pipe is destined to be a greenhouse dweller. If you’re in Arizona, choose a sheltered spot in the garden and get growing.

A close up horizontal image of the spines on an organ pipe cactus with tiny red growth point.

Like most other types of cacti, this species need only be watered sparingly, and infrequently.

At a maximum, you should water once a week. Make sure you let the soil dry out completely before watering, over the course of a week or two.

In more humid environments with plentiful rain, organ pipe should be grown in an unglazed ceramic pot to encourage drainage and prevent root rot.

If growing yours inside and the air is consistently humid, consider running a dehumidifier.

Fertilization is not necessary for this unfussy lover of gritty, low-nutrient soils when grown outside.

  • Site in a warm location where the temperature will not drop below 45°F.
  • Shelter against a wall, large rock, or other structure in climates prone to frost.
  • Plant in full sun.
  • Once established outdoors, water only in dry spells.

Once established, organ pipe requires little maintenance save occasional watering.

A close up horizontal image of new growth on the side of Stenocereus thurberi.

Cacti in pots will need watering approximately once a week, and feeding once a year in spring with a diluted solution of 5-10-5 NPK houseplant fertilizer. Make sure to dilute any liquid fertilizer given to half strength.

No pruning is required, however, this cactus does occasionally shed limbs which can be cut off and composted.

Although organ pipe cactus is a relatively popular succulent for the home and garden scene, sourcing a larger sized specimen can be tricky.

Try calling around to bigger nurseries in metropolitan areas, or ask at a local botanical garden for intel.

Many gardens have a cactus house with a knowledgeable gardener who can give you the inside scoop.

If all else fails, you may be able to source seed online.

Virtually pest- and disease-free in its natural environment, organ pipe is as tough as they come.

Outside of the hot desert conditions of the southwest and Mexico, however, excess moisture and cold can weaken plants and cause problems.

Unsurprisingly, there’s not a herbivore in existence that can make it past the fearsome spines once the cactus is old enough to wield them.

Armed to the teeth, this plant knows how to protect its hard won moisture and food.

Insects and Arachnids

Mercifully pest free, the organ pipe has few bugs that plague it.

When grown in a pot, particularly indoors in overly moist environments, the occasional beasty can take up residence on newer growth.

Squishy, spidery, unsavory things, mealybugs are lovers of warm, humid environments and stressed-out plants.

To relieve your cactus of an infestation, spray the mealybugs and their white, cottony egg masses with a strong stream of water. Use a cotton ball dipped in 70 percent isopropyl alcohol to wipe off the ones you missed.

Plug in a dehumidifier to reduce moisture in the air indoors, and make sure your cactus isn’t too densely packed in with other plants.

Learn more about battling mealybug infestations in our guide .

Spider Mites

Spider mites are another common problem of greenhouse growing. These little cousins of ticks and spiders thrive in hot indoor conditions.

To rid your cactus of these creepy-crawlies and their giveaway white webbing, spray your plants with a strong stream of water.

Insecticidal oils like neem oil will also kill spider mites, but be careful not to use it when the sun is shining brightly as the oil can actually burn your plant.

Read our guide for more info on spider mites .

Find more tips on identifying pests of cactus here .

Lucky for you, and your organ pipe, not much can survive the hot, arid wastes of the Sonoran Desert, and that applies to pathogens, too.

But grown in less than ideal conditions, you’ll always want to keep proper drainage in mind.

Organ pipe cactus is highly susceptible to overwatering. In wet and soggy, low-oxygen environments, the bacteria and fungi that can cause root rot thrive.

Signs of root rot include stem discoloration, soft and squishy stems, and a bad smell emanating from the soil.

Unfortunately you won’t see symptoms of this difficult to reverse problem until it’s almost too late, in many cases.

Make sure to water carefully and infrequently to prevent it. Plant outdoors in a pot in areas with high rainfall so your cactus can be moved and protected from too much moisture.

Best Uses for Organ Pipe Cactus

Let’s face it, the organ pipe cactus is not exactly the most utilitarian of garden plants. But if you’re a lover of novelties and you swoon over succulents, try this native out.

A close up horizontal image of a white flower on a cactus pictured on a dark background.

Its distinct flowers might invite some new wildlife into the nighttime garden and its gorgeous architectural shape will add interesting lines to your beds or greenhouse display.

The juicy, sweet fruits are typically harvested one month after pollination takes place.

Approximately the size of a tennis ball, each fruit is loaded with numerous glossy little black seeds.

The Long and Short of the Lofty Organ Pipe

Pest resistant, sun-loving, and impervious to drought, organ pipe cactus is hardy and hassle-free. So long as you’re in the right climate, that is.

When setting up your organ pipe at home or in the garden, it will go a long way to think like a cactus and remember what these plants really want: hot, dry, and sunny conditions.

Keep these parameters in mind and you’ll have this titan of the desert growing for decades, maybe even centuries, to come.

Where does your organ pipe cactus grow? What tricks do you have to protect your cactus from frost? Let us know about your trials, tribulations, and triumphs in the comments!

For more reading on the organ pipe’s spiny and squishy cousins, check out these articles on growing cacti and succulents next:

  • How to Grow Prickly Pear Cactus
  • How to Grow and Care for Succulents
  • What Are Cactus Glochid Spines?
  • Pinterest 4

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Molly Marquand

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Stenocereus Pruinosus Care: The Definitive Guide

By: Author Daniel

Posted on Last updated: January 18, 2021

Stenocereus Pruinosus Care: The Definitive Guide

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The world of cacti is extremely vast. Some plants are incredibly small and others as tall as a skyscraper.

The Stenocereus group of plants belongs to the latter category. One of my favorite plants in this family is the pruinosus, which can grow up to 16 feet tall.

It’s super easy to care for, and it rewards your effort and patience with beautiful blooms and edible fruits.

If you’re looking to acquire this plant, we’ve outlined everything you need to know about caring for Stenocereus pruinosus in this comprehensive guide.

Table of Contents

Stenocereus pruinosus Care Guide

When choosing a potting media for this plant, the most important factor to look for is good drainage.

It’s best to look for a commercial mix tailored for cactus plants. But, I prefer to make my own DIY combo. My mix typically consists of potting soil, sand, and perlite, all in equal proportions. These ingredients ensure that just a small amount of water is retained while the excess gets drained.

Another thing I like to do is to plant my pruinosus in an unglazed clay pot because it’s porous. This container allows excess water to drain with ease. It also encourages aeration, which enables the roots to develop healthily.

When you think of a Cactus, the first thing that probably comes to mind is the fact that it’s mainly found in deserts and arid areas.

Although these areas aren’t an accurate representation of all cacti species, they reveal a crucial aspect of its natural habitat- light. Cacti require exposure to bright sunlight to thrive, and the Stenocereus pruinosus is no exception.

This plant uses light not only to grow but also to flower. It means that if you’re growing your cactus indoors, you should ensure that it’s receiving at least 12 to 18 hours of strong sunlight every day. I like to place my pruinosus on a south-facing windowsill as this is where it receives maximum sunlight.

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The hardest aspect to get right when caring for the Stenocereus pruinosus is watering. Water too much, and its roots will start rotting. Water too little and it will start discoloring and shriveling.

In the scheme of care though, providing this plant with too little water is a safer bet than overwatering. Its roots are highly susceptible to rot, which is caused by overwatering. So ensure you never leave your plant sitting in soggy soil.

For gardeners with a green thumb, figuring out the frequency of watering this cactus can be difficult. When I acquired my first Stenocereus pruinosus, I had a hard time too.

But after researching, I came across one trick, and it’s worked successfully ever since. It entails giving your plant ample time to dry out between waterings.

To know whether it’s dry, poke your finger into the soil and assess its moisture level. If the top few inches of soil feel completely dry, then this is a good time to water. However, if you feel that the soil is moist, wait a few more days before watering.

If you don’t like to get your hands dirty, then you might want to invest in a quality water gauge. Also known as a moisture meter, this gadget gives you an accurate reading of your soil’s moisture level. You can get one for less than $10. Plus, you can buy a multifunctional one, which also tells you the soil’s pH and sunlight level.

Another hack to help you avoid overwatering your plant is to be mindful of the season. During spring and fall, which is when most of its growth takes place, you can water regularly. But in winter, this plant becomes dormant. Thus, you should cut back or suspend watering altogether.

Temperature

The Stenocereus pruinosus fares best in temperatures ranging between 65 and 85°F (18°C to 29°C), especially when it’s in the growth stage. But during winter, it can survive in lower temperatures of about 45 to 55°F (7°C to 13°C).

Although other Cacti plants do just fine in frosty weather, the pruinosus isn’t one of them. It means that if the temperatures start to dip too low, you’re better off bringing your plant indoors.

When it comes to humidity, you want to maintain it between 40 and 60%. Since the standard humidity level is 30 to 50%, your Stenocereus will survive without any trouble.

However, if the moisture level at your home is too low, you might have to intervene. You can mist your cactus regularly, to ensure that its moisture level doesn’t plummet. But overall, this plant does not get affected by dry air as this is what it’s used to in the wild.

That said, examine the specific spot where you place this plant. The ideal place should be away from heat-generating appliances, such as a furnace or air conditioner.

Even though the Stenocereus pruinosus is a low-maintenance species, it can do with a bit of fertilizer. The best time to fertilize is in spring and summer so as to boost its growth. You don’t need to fertilize it in winter as it won’t be able to utilize nutrients efficiently when it’s in dormancy.

Apart from timing, you should also pay attention to the type of fertilizer you use. Whenever I’m shopping for fertilizer to add to my pruinosus’ potting mix, I always pick an all-purpose one that’s recommended specifically for cacti.

This way, I’m certain that my plant is getting nutrients, which are unique to its needs.

Whichever fertilizer you buy, you’ll want to dilute it to half strength before application. Diluting ensures that the fertilizer’s contents aren’t too strong for your houseplant.

Propagation

If you want to give this ornamental houseplant to a friend/ family member, you can propagate it from a stem cutting. But to do this successfully, there are a few rules you should comply with.

For starters, use a sharp garden knife when making the cutting. This makes it easier for the parent plant to recover from the incision. Secondly, try and make the incision at a 45-degree angle. Doing so protects the plant by minimizing the chances of water pooling at the wounded section.

Once you have your cutting, square it off at the base, and then dust a bit of sulfur or a rooting element to increase its chances of rooting. Now all that’s left to do is to exercise patience and allow it to develop a callus.

As soon as the callus forms, transplant your cutting into a suitable potting medium. My propagating mix usually consists of equal parts pumice/perlite and compost.

Be sure to place your cutting deep enough in the pot to prevent it from tipping over. Also, remember to water it till the soil is slightly damp, then move your container to a brightly-lit area.

If it’s well taken care of, the pruinosus displays a reasonable amount of growth each year. However, it’s a slow-growing cactus, and it can take years to mature fully. When it’s fully grown, it reaches a height of up to 16 feet (5 meters) and a width of about 10 feet (3 meters).

If you’re planting Stenocereus pruinosus indoors, it will get to a point where you’ll have to repot it because it will have outgrown its current pot.

When this time comes, ensure the potting soil is dry before removing your plant. Shake off the old soil, prune away rotting roots (if present), then place in a new container with a suitable potting mix.  

Common Problems with Stenocereus pruinosus

Issues you’ll likely encounter when growing your Stenocereus pruinosus will range from sap-sucking pests like whiteflies to root rot and fungal disease.

Different kinds of pests can attack your cactus regardless of whether you’re growing it indoors or outdoors. Here’s a list of the most common culprits:

  • Spider mites – these will appear as brown dots on your pruinosus. To eradicate them, consider increasing the humidity level in your home, temporarily. Alternatively, you can introduce a predatory mite called Phytoseiulus persimilis.
  • Mealybugs – in this case, your infested Stenocereus pruinosus will be covered in small, wooly white nests. Try treating your plant with a homemade soap insecticide or introduce a natural predator like ladybug.
  • Whiteflies – if these pests attack your cactus, you will notice sooty mold growing on its leaves. Luckily, these pests are easy to eliminate using insecticidal spray or soap.

Just like other succulents, your Stenocereus pruinosus is vulnerable to fungal disease. Most of them crop up in late spring or autumn. When the condensation from the cold nights falls on your cactus, it fails to evaporate, resulting in stem or root rot.

Thankfully, there are a couple of things you can do to keep these issues at bay:

  • Provide ample ventilation. If you’re growing your Stenocereus pruinosus indoors, ensure there’s ample ventilation
  • Avoid overhead watering when there’s high humidity. Excess moisture encourages the growth of fungal spores on your plant
  • Allow time to dry between waterings. If its leaves or stems are consistently wet, they will encourage spore growth.

In the event that your plant is already affected with a fungal disease, look for a fungicide tailored for treating these problems in cacti plants.

Tips to Keep Stenocereus pruinosus Problem-Free

If you’re growing the Stenocereus pruinosus, you may be wary that you’re not doing everything right. Here are the most important factors to consider when growing this cactus:

  • Lighting- expose your pruinosus to strong light, moreso in winter. If you’re growing your plant indoors, consider moving it outside for a few hours in summer.
  • Soil- look for a fast-draining potting mix, formulated specifically for cacti. If you prefer to make your own, incorporate components that will improve the drainage and aeration of regular soil. Perlite is a good example.
  • Watering- when it’s growing actively, water regularly, but allow the soil to dry out between waterings. Water sparingly or only when the soil is dry to the touch, in winter.
  • Temperature- this plant prefers hot, dry temperatures; a range of 65 to 85°F ((18°C to 29°C) is ideal.
  • Humidity- moisture levels of 40 to 60% will help your pruinosus to grow healthily
  • Feeding- fertilize your Stenocereus pruinosus during the growing season

Stenocereus pruinosus Plant Profile

Stenocereus pruinosus is known by its more popular name, ‘Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus’ or ‘Pitaya’. This plant is native to Mexico, where it’s grown as a food source. Here, its fruit is harvested widely, then sold in the local markets.

You will find the plant growing in the tropical and subtropical climates of Puebla (north) and Oaxaca (south). You may also come across it in the drier regions of Veracruz to the east.

The pruinosus is a columnar cactus, which produces one or more trunks. Small-branching stems grow from the trunks’ base, forming V-shaped structures.

Each stem will possess a gray-green hue and have a distinctive bloom. This stem color explains how the plant earned its name “gray ghost organ pipe”. These stems will also have 6 to 10 ribs, which will be lined with areolas, from which the flowers will grow.

Frequently Asked Questions About Stenocereus pruinosus

How do i know whether i am over-or under-watering my stenocereus pruinosus.

This plant has the capability to store considerable amounts of water in its leaves. But once this supply runs out, the entire plant starts to fall apart. An underwatered pruinosus begins to discolor and shrivel. This condition often starts with the lower leaves before working its way up.

In the case of overwatering, you’ll notice that your plant starts to have a mushy texture. Its leaves and stems may also turn black or brown as the roots start to rot.

What is the most suitable place to plant the Stenocereus pruinosus?

If you have a garden or backyard, the best place to plant this species is outdoors, where it can grow to the enormous structure that it is. If it grows beyond a certain point, it might not fit in your home, not to mention, providing it with the high and intense light that it requires will be challenging.

This does not necessarily mean that you can’t grow it indoors. Now, if you choose this route, be sure to prune it frequently. The good news is that it’s a slow grower, so it might be a couple of years before it reaches the difficult-to-manage size.

Another point to note if you’re growing your pruinosus indoors is to provide it with sufficient amounts of light. As we mentioned earlier, it requires bright direct sunlight to grow and blossom.

Can Stenocereus pruinosus grow in regular soil?

Sure, this cactus can grow in regular garden soil, but I would not recommend doing so. Using a potting mix tailored for this plant is better because it’s designed to address its unique needs.

Parting Words

The Stenocereus pruinosus has stunning beauty, especially when it blooms and produces those beautiful white, funnel-shaped flowers. Its fruits also add to its beauty as they come in vibrant shades of yellow and orange-green.

Growing this plant is a breeze. Since it’s a low-maintenance plant, all you need to do is adhere to a few simple rules and you’re good to go.

These principles entail providing adequate amounts of light, watering when the soil dries out, offering relatively low humidity, and using a suitable potting mix.

Daniel Iseli

Daniel has been a plant enthusiast for over 20 years. He owns hundreds of houseplants and prepares for the chili growing seasons yearly with great anticipation. His favorite plants are plant species in the Araceae family, such as Monstera, Philodendron, and Anthurium. He also loves gardening and is growing hot peppers, tomatoes, and many more vegetables.

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Succulent Advisor

Stenocereus Pruinosus: Care And Propagation Guide

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Last Updated on July 8, 2023

If you’re looking for a unique and interesting plant to add to your collection, the Stenocereus pruinosus is a great option! Also known as the “frosty cactus” or “old man of Mexico”, this slow-growing plant is native to the Sonoran Desert. It has an upright columnar growth habit and can reach up to 15 feet tall in its natural habitat. The stem is covered in white spines that give it a frosty appearance, hence its common name. The flowers are nocturnal, white or pale pink in color, and have a sweet fragrance.

If you’re looking for a unique succulent to add to your collection, look no further than the Stenocereus pruinosus! This unusual plant is native to Mexico and can be found in a variety of colors, including green, blue, and purple. While it’s not the easiest plant to care for, with a little patience and attention, it can thrive indoors or out. Here are a few tips on how to care for your Stenocereus pruinosus: Light: This plant prefers full sun but can tolerate some partial shade. If you live in an area with hot summers, it’s best to protect your plant from direct afternoon sun. Water: Water deeply but infrequently, allowing the soil to dry out completely between waterings. During the winter months, reduce watering even further. Over-watering is one of the most common causes of death for this plant. Soil: A well-draining cactus or succulent mix is ideal. Regular potting soil will also work as long as you amend it with some perlite or sand. Fertilizer: Fertilize sparingly with a low-nitrogen fertilizer during the growing season (spring and summer). Avoid fertilizing during the fall and winter months when growth slows down.

Stenocereus Pruinosus: Care And Propagation Guide

Credit: succulentalley.com

Table of Contents

How Do You Care for a Stenocereus Pruinosus?

If you are lucky enough to have a Stenocereus pruinosus, also known as the “snowball cactus”, you will want to take good care of it. Here are some tips: This cactus is native to Mexico and prefers hot, dry conditions. It will do best in full sun but can tolerate some light shade. The ideal temperature range is 70-85 degrees Fahrenheit. Water your snowball cactus deeply but infrequently, allowing the soil to dry out completely between waterings. In winter, reduce watering even further. Too much water can lead to root rot, so be careful not to overwater. Fertilize your cactus every two weeks during the growing season with a balanced fertilizer diluted to half strength. Stop fertilizing in late summer or early fall to allow the plant time to rest before winter dormancy. As with all cacti, be careful when handling as the spines can be sharp and irritating. Wear gloves if necessary.

Does a Cactus Need Sunlight?

Cacti are a type of plant that is adapted to living in hot, dry conditions. They typically have thick, fleshy leaves or pads that store water, and they often have spines or sharp scales on their surface. Most cacti grow in desert regions, where they get plenty of sunlight. However, not all cacti need full sun all the time. Some species can tolerate some shade, particularly if it is during the hottest part of the day. If you live in an area with very hot summers, it might be best to provide some afternoon shade for your cactus. You can do this by putting up awnings or shading cloths over your plants, or by planting them under trees or shrubs that will provide some relief from the direct sun. In general, though, cacti need bright light to thrive. If you are growing them indoors, make sure to place them near a sunny window where they will receive at least six hours of direct sunlight each day.

How to Grow Cactus Indoors?

Cactus are unique and interesting plants that make great houseplants. They are easy to care for, don’t require a lot of water, and can thrive in bright indirect light. If you’re looking for a plant that is low-maintenance and stylish, then growing cactus indoors is a great option! Here are some tips on how to grow cactus indoors: 1. Choose the right potting mix: Cactus need a well-draining potting mix that contains sand or grit. This helps to prevent root rot and keeps the soil from getting too soggy. You can either purchase a pre-made cactus mix from your local garden center, or make your own by mixing together equal parts sand, perlite, and peat moss. 2. Give them plenty of light: Cactus need bright indirect sunlight to thrive. If you don’t have a spot in your home that gets enough natural light, then you can supplement with artificial grow lights. Place your cactus near a south-facing window if possible. 3. Water them sparingly: One of the great things about cactus is that they don’t require a lot of water! In fact, overwatering is one of the biggest mistakes people make when growing cacti indoors. Only water your cactus when the soil is completely dry – typically once every 1-2 weeks during the spring and summer months, and even less frequently during the fall and winter months.

How Fast Does a Cactus Grow?

A cactus can grow quite quickly when it is young, but the rate at which it grows slows down as the plant matures. In ideal conditions, a cactus can add an inch or two of growth each year. But in less than ideal conditions, such as during a drought, a cactus may not grow at all in a given year.

Stenocereus pruinosus – grow, care & harvest (Beautiful & edible)

Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus Care

If you’re looking for a unique and interesting plant to add to your home, the Gray Ghost organ pipe cactus (Lophocereus chrysocarpus) is a great option! This slow-growing cactus can reach up to 15 feet tall, and is covered in beautiful white flowers that bloom at night. Organ pipe cacti are native to Mexico and can be found in desert or rocky areas. They prefer full sun but can also tolerate partial shade. When watering, be sure to allow the soil to dry out completely between waterings. Overwatering can lead to root rot, so it’s better to err on the side of too little rather than too much. Gray ghost organ pipe cacti are not difficult to care for, but they do require a bit of patience since they grow slowly. But if you’re willing to wait, you’ll be rewarded with a stunning and unusual plant that will add character and interest to your space!

Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus Growth Rate

The Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus is a beautiful and unique plant that is native to the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. This cactus typically grows to be about 6-8 feet tall, but can sometimes reach heights of up to 15 feet. The Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus has a slow growth rate, only growing about 1 inch per year. Even though it has a slow growth rate, this cactus can live for many years, sometimes even 100 years or more! The Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus gets its name from its grayish-green color and its ghost-like appearance. If you are lucky enough to see one of these amazing plants in person, you will definitely be impressed by its beauty!

Ghost Pipe Cactus

If you’re looking for a unique and interesting plant to add to your collection, you may want to consider the ghost pipe cactus. This unusual cactus is native to Mexico and gets its name from its haunting appearance. The ghost pipe cactus is characterized by its long, thin stems that are covered in white fuzz. These stems can grow up to 6 feet tall and produce small white flowers. The ghost pipe cactus is not only fascinating to look at, but it’s also relatively easy to care for. It prefers bright, indirect sunlight and well-draining soil. Allow the soil to dry out completely between waterings. During the winter months, reduce watering even further. The ghost pipe cactus is also fairly drought tolerant, so if you forget to water it occasionally, it will likely be just fine. If you’re looking for a plant that’s sure to turn heads, the ghost pipe cactus is a great option!

Stenocereus Pruinosus for Sale

Looking for a unique and interesting plant to add to your collection? Consider the Stenocereus pruinosus! This unusual cactus is native to Mexico and can be found in a variety of colors, including green, blue, and purple. It’s a relatively slow-growing plant, but it can reach up to 6 feet tall in its natural habitat. The Stenocereus pruinosus is not commonly available for sale, but you may be able to find it at a specialty nursery or online. When purchasing this cactus, make sure to choose a healthy specimen with no signs of disease or pests. Also, be sure to provide plenty of bright light and well-draining soil. With proper care, your Stenocereus pruinosus will thrive for many years!

Is the Care and Propagation Process Similar for Stenocereus Marginatus and Stenocereus Pruinosus?

The care and propagation process for Stenocereus marginatus and Stenocereus pruinosus may not be exactly similar. However, it is crucial to understand the specific requirements for stenocereus marginatus care and propagation to ensure optimal growth and development. Proper knowledge of factors such as sunlight, soil conditions, watering, and suitable propagation methods is essential for successfully nurturing these cacti species.

Looking for a new and unusual cactus to add to your collection? Consider the Stenocereus pruinosus! This Mexican native is easily recognizable by its furry, white-frosted stems. It’s a fast grower and relatively easy to care for, making it a great choice for beginner cacti growers. Keep reading to learn more about how to care for and propagate your Stenocereus pruinosus. The Stenocereus pruinosus is a columnar cactus that can reach up to 6 feet (1.8 m) tall. It has 8-10 ribs with sharp spines that are covered in a white, fuzzy coating of hair-like fibers called trichomes. The tips of the stems are green or pinkish in color, and the plant produces small yellow flowers that bloom at night. This cactus is native to Mexico and can be found growing in arid desert regions. In its natural habitat, it receives very little water and lots of bright sunlight. When growing your Stenocereus pruinosus indoors, you’ll want to mimic these conditions as closely as possible. Water your cactus deeply but infrequently, allowing the soil to dry out completely between watering sessions. During the active growth period (spring and summer), you may need to water once every 2-3 weeks. Reduce watering even further during the winter months when growth slows down; once every 4-6 weeks should suffice. Your Stenocereus pruinosus will also need plenty of bright light to thrive indoors. Place it near a south- or west-facing window where it will receive full sun for at least part of the day.

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ghost organ pipe cactus

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Stenocereus Species, Gray Ghost Organ Pipe, Pitayo, Pitaya of October

Stenocereus pruinosus.

Stenocereus pruinosus by palmbob

Unknown - Tell us

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Chandler, Arizona

Mesa, Arizona

Phoenix, Arizona(2 reports)

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Gardener's notes:.

I have a bluish cactus thats supposed to be this, but mine is twisting, its not got the straight ribs, its growing in a corkscrew way.

The fruit of this plant are harvested for food. Additional synonyms are Cactus pruinosus & Cereus edulis.

Grey green columnar cactus that forms some branches low, but then all columns pretty much solitary up to 20'. RElatively sparsely spined ...Read More as young plant. Mexican species with only mild cold tolerance. Small white to pinkish flowers bloom at night.

ghost organ pipe cactus

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ghost organ pipe cactus

Gray Ghost Organ Pipe

Stenocereus pruinosus, stenocereus, caryophyllales.

ghost organ pipe cactus

How to care for Gray Ghost Organ Pipe

How often to water your gray ghost organ pipe.

Water needs for Gray Ghost Organ Pipe

Gray Ghost Organ Pipe needs 0.5 cups of water every 12 when it doesn’t get direct sunlight and is potted in a 5" pot.

Use our water calculator to personalize watering recommendations to your environment or download Greg for more advanced recommendations for all of your plants.

Calculate water needs of Gray Ghost Organ Pipe

Water 0.5 cups every 12

Does your plant get direct sunlight?

Select the pot size

ghost organ pipe cactus

Finding light for Gray Ghost Organ Pipe in your home

Light needs and placement for plant Gray Ghost Organ Pipe: 1ft from a window

Gray Ghost Organ Pipe love being close to bright, sunny windows 😎.

Place it less than 1ft from a south-facing window to maximize the potential for growth.

Gray Ghost Organ Pipe does not tolerate low-light 🚫.

Select your region to see how the current weather in your area affects the placement of Gray Ghost Organ Pipe in your home 🏡.

How to fertilize Gray Ghost Organ Pipe

Nutrient, fertilizer, and repotting needs for Gray Ghost Organ Pipe: repot after 2X growth

Most potting soils come with ample nutrients which plants use to produce new growth.

By the time your plant has depleted the nutrients in its soil it’s likely grown enough to need a larger pot anyway.

To replenish this plant's nutrients, repot your Gray Ghost Organ Pipe after it doubles in size or once a year —whichever comes first.

What kind of plant is this?

ghost organ pipe cactus

#GrayGhostOrganPipe Seeing some powdery tops on these two!

ghost organ pipe cactus

I just found out I’ve been over watering my cactus and it has mold. Anything to help this poor thing other than change my watering? #GrayGhostOrganPipe

Gray Ghost Organ Pipe thrives in dry soil and should be watered sparingly . Use our water calculator to personalize watering recommendations to your environment or download Greg for more advanced recommendations for all of your plants.

Gray Ghost Organ Pipe requires abundant, bright and direct light. Place it less than one foot from a window to ensure it receives enough light to survive 💪. Select your region to see how the current weather in your area affects the placement in your home 🏡.

Greg does not have confirmed data on this plant’s toxicity. If you, a family member, or a pet consumes plant material of unknown toxicity, it’s always best to consult a medical professional.

If you or someone else ingested this plant, call Poison Control at US (800) 222-1222 . If a pet consumed this plant, contact your veterinarian or the ASPCA at  US (888) 426-4435 .

Gray Ghost Organ Pipe produces flowers in the wild, but does not flower when kept as houseplants.

When troubleshooting a sad-looking houseplant, start by checking for signs of distress in its leaves, such as yellowing, browning, or drooping, which can indicate overwatering or nutrient deficiencies.

Inspect the soil moisture; too dry or too wet soil can cause problems.

Finally, consider environmental factors like temperature and humidity, and adjust care routines accordingly to revive your plant.

Care Summary for Gray Ghost Organ Pipe

Gray Ghost Organ Pipe

0.5 cups every 12 days

ghost organ pipe cactus

< 1ft from a window

ghost organ pipe cactus

Repot after 2x growth

Based on the 4” pot your plant is in, and that it doesn’t get direct sunlight .

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What Is A Stenocereus Cactus – Learn About Stenocereus Plants

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Stenocereus

Of all the varieties of cactus, Stenocereus is one of the broadest in terms of form. What is a Stenocereus cactus? It is a genus of typically columnar cacti whose branches develop in very unique manners. Stenocereus cactus plants are usually quite large and considered outdoor specimens when used in the landscape.

What is a Stenocereus Cactus?

The world of cacti is a wondrous place filled with tiny to skyscraping plants in all shapes and colors. The many types of Stenocereus mostly fit the taller category, with vertical limbs that provide the main characteristic of the genera. Stenocereus cacti are native to the southwestern United States and northern parts of Mexico. One of the more impressive and commonly known plants in this family is the organ pipe cactus , which can grow up to 16 feet (4 m.) tall. Other Stenocereus are more shrub-like and barely knee high. A wide range of forms occurs in the genus but most have long limbs and branches. The name stems from the Greek word "stenos," which means narrow. The reference refers to the ribs and stems of the plants. Most Stenocereus cactus plants are ribbed and have pronounced spines and range from gray to greenish gray and green.

Types of Stenocereus

The organ pipe cactus may be the most known of the genera but there are many spectacular specimens. Stenocereus beneckei is a spineless form that has large creamy night blooming flowers. Stenocereus alamosensis is the octopus cactus, so named because of its numerous thick, long-spined stems that spring out almost horizontally from the base. The genus has plants with extremely fun and descriptive names such as:

  • Creeping devil caterpillar cactus
  • Dagger cactus
  • Gray ghost organ pipe

Such names give an insight into their various, wildly interesting forms. Most develop ribbed, long stems with almost sinuous beauty. After the rainy season, large brightly colored to white flowers are produced followed by spiny fruit.

Growing Stenocereus Cacti

Stenocereus cacti hail from arid regions. They prefer desert conditions and have a minimal tolerance to cold temperatures. The desert has a definite rainy season in which the cacti achieve most of their growth and store moisture in their limbs. The spines on most species help prevent excess evaporation and protect them from some pests. In the home landscape, they will need supplemental watering only in the hottest periods. Gritty, rocky or sandy soil provides the best environment for their roots. They do not need pruning and need minimal nutrition. In warm regions, they are drought tolerant and welcome plants with few needs, but a powerful presence in the landscape.

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Stenocereus pruinosus (gray ghost organ pipe).

Stenocereus pruinosus (Gray Ghost Organ Pipe) is a large shrubby or tree-like cactus with a distinct trunk from which the branching stems…

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Stenocereus pruinosus “Gray Ghost Organ Pipe”

Stenocereus pruinosus “Gray Ghost Organ Pipe”

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Stenocereus pruinosus  (gray ghost organ pipe) is a powdery, gray columnar cactus that grows to 20' in height in time. White nocturnal flower. Native habitat is Puebla, Mexico. Protect from frost. Provide bright light/sun; hardy to 32F. 

SURVIVE & THRIVE

Recommended pairings: coming soon Bloom time: Summer Size: Up to 2' wide and 20' tall Requires porous cactus soil with adequate drainage Provide sun/bright light with ample airflow Water thoroughly when soil is dry during the active growing season Hardiness: USDA Zone 10a (30-35° F)

Part of what makes succulents so fascinating are the myriad ways they express themselves throughout the year, depending on light, season, temperature, soil, and hydration. For those and other reasons, the plants you receive may not look exactly as they appear on our website.

AT-HOME GUIDANCE

Caring for your new plant is easy with Greg's help. You'll receive a companion app that provides ongoing Stenocereus pruinosus “Gray Ghost Organ Pipe” care , plant health tips, and help from a community of other Altman customers that will ensure your new plant thrives in its new home.

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ghost organ pipe cactus

Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus

This large, shrubby columnar cactus becomes tall dark green with age but is a nice powdery blue gray when young. They will nocturnally produce small white flowers that have a pink tinge and following the flowers are very large edible fruits about the size of a small apple that will change color from yellow, orange-green to a purple. This cactus is great for a native landscape needing full sun, little water, and no fertilizer. They also require little to no pruning making them a worry free addition. They will grow to be around 15-20ft tall with a 10ft spread. 

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Mexican Ghost Pipe Cactus (Stenocereus thurberi)

Mexican Ghost Pipe Cactus (Stenocereus thurberi)

The Mexican Ghost Pipe Cactus, also known as Organ Pipe, is a fruit-bearing cactus that produces sweet deep pinkish-purple fruit known as Pitahaya Dulce.

Large, gorgeous flower buds in lavender, pale white, and pink will open for weeks at a time. Flowers usually open and are pollinated at night. Long greenish gray slender curving stems grow from the base of the cactus.  It will usually grow to 15-20 feet but can reach lengths up to 30 feet.    The prized red fruits are large and spiny, and ripen in late summer. When they mature, they lose their spines and open to show an edible, red pulp.  Can be eaten fresh, dried, turned into jelly, make into syrup or fermented into a wine-like drink.

Plant Type Fruiting Cactus

Harvest Season Summer-Fall Mature Size 4-30 ft. tall, spreading 2-10 ft.

Soil & Moisture Dry, well-draining, cactus soil, little moisture is needed, drought tolerant

Light Requirements Full Sun

Self-Fertile Yes

Growth Rate Slow, grows about 2.5 inches a year

Zone Hardiness Outdoors 9-11 with frost protection ; Patio/Greenhouse 4+

Propagation

ghost organ pipe cactus

Cactus is about 4 inches tall. Arrived healthy and unharmed during transport. It was light green with tiny speckles of red. Spines are mean looking and long. It is an attractive cactus overall.

ghost organ pipe cactus

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Stenocereus pruinosis

Stenocereus pruinosis

An interesting tropical cactus also called the 'Gray Ghost organ pipe' that occurs in many different areas of Mexico, this species is a columnar cacti with bluish-green coloration and a dusty-looking coating of white powder on new growth. It features white flowers that bloom both day and night to allow for pollination 24-hours a day, and produces ovoid, edible fruit about the size of a small apple.

The namesake 'Pitayo de Octubre' and 'Pitayo de Mayo' describe its habits of blooming and producing fruit in both Spring and Fall, namely in May and October. The color of the fruit ranges from yellow-orange to green and purple. 

This is not a cold hardy cacti, but will take colder temperatures if the soil is dry. If grown in a container, it will also maintain a smaller size. 

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Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus

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The “gray ghost” part of this plant’s name refers to its dusty gray-green color; the “organ pipe” moniker refers to the look of the mature wild plant: the tall, vertical, uniform columns of closely bunched trunks are reminiscent of a medieval church organ. In the wilds of Mexico, this cactus can grow up to 16 feet (4.9 m) tall. This small household yarn version is five inches tall with spines of cotton embroidery floss. His expression and long needles seem to say, “Don’t touch me!”--but what he really needs is a hug.

ghost organ pipe cactus

  • First published: December 2017
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IMAGES

  1. Stenocereus Pruinosus Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus

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  2. Stenocereus pruinosus Gray Ghost Organ Pipe cactus

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  3. Stenocereus Pruinosus Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus Live

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  4. Stenocereus Pruinosus Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus Live

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  5. Stenocereus Pruinosus Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus Live

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  6. Stenocereus Pruinosus Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus Live

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  1. Awesome Arizona Dust Devil

  2. Ho Ho H-Organ Pipe Cactus! #organpipe #cactus #hohoho #christmas #cactusgarden #santa #cactusjeff

  3. O Holy Ghost

  4. Wow 😮 This place is Bucket List worthy! #reels #destinations #vloglife #bucketlistadventure #gonow

  5. Organ'

  6. Working AO-91 in Arizona

COMMENTS

  1. Gray Ghost Organ Pipe (Stenocereus Pruinosus) Ultimate Care Guide

    The Stenocereus Pruinosus succulent is also known by its common name of Gray Ghost Organ Pipe. In addition, it has numerous other biological names, such as Cactus Pruinosus, Cereus Roridus, and Stenocereus Longispinus. This is an unusual cactus plant, found growing in the wild in certain areas of Mexico.

  2. Stenocereus pruinosus (Gray Ghost Organ Pipe)

    Description Stenocereus pruinosus is a large shrubby or tree-like cactus with a distinct trunk from which the branching stems arise. It grows up to 16 feet (4.9 m) tall and 10 feet (3 m) wide. Stems are gray-green, often with powdery bloom near the apex, up to 4 inches (10 cm) across. They have 6 to 10 very high ribs lined with areoles.

  3. Stenocereus pruinosus 'Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus'

    The Stenocereus pruinosus 'Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus' is a columnar cactus with a striking appearance. Its gray-green stems are covered in numerous spines, giving it a ghostly look that sets it apart from other cacti. The plant produces large, white flowers with a sweet fragrance, adding to its charm. Size and Growth Rate

  4. Stenocereus thurberi

    Stenocereus thurberi, the organ pipe cactus, [3] is a species of cactus native to Mexico and the United States. The species is found in rocky desert. Two subspecies are recognized based on their distribution and height. The Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument is named for the species.

  5. Gray Ghost Organ Pipe

    Gray Ghost Organ Pipe ( Stenocereus pruinosus) (Buxbaum): Powdery blue-green columnar cactus from Mexico. In the wild, it can eventually grow to 20.0' with new branches sprouting from the base and trunk, but in cultivation it tends to stay under 6.0'.

  6. How to Grow and Care for Organ Pipe Cactus

    July 22, 2023 by Molly Marquand Stenocereus thurberi Icon of the southwest, organ pipe cactus ( Stenocereus thurberi) is one of the best known species of cacti in the United States. Reaching up to 26 feet in height and 12 feet wide, this slow-growing, long-lived sun lover can be truly enormous.

  7. Stenocereus Pruinosus Care: The Definitive Guide

    Last updated: January 18, 2021 Sharing is caring! The world of cacti is extremely vast. Some plants are incredibly small and others as tall as a skyscraper. The Stenocereus group of plants belongs to the latter category. One of my favorite plants in this family is the pruinosus, which can grow up to 16 feet tall.

  8. Stenocereus Pruinosus: Care And Propagation Guide

    By Michael Hannon Last Updated on July 8, 2023 If you're looking for a unique and interesting plant to add to your collection, the Stenocereus pruinosus is a great option! Also known as the "frosty cactus" or "old man of Mexico", this slow-growing plant is native to the Sonoran Desert.

  9. Stenocereus Species, Gray Ghost Organ Pipe, Pitayo, Pitaya of October

    Info Genus Stenocereus (sten-oh-KER-ee-us) Info Species pruinosus (proo-in-NO-sus) Info Synonym Cereus pruinosis Lemaireocereus pruinosus Rathbunia pruinosa Ritterocereus pruinosus Echinocactus pruinosus Sun Exposure Full Sun Foliage Grown for foliage Evergreen Height 10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m) 12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m) 15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m) Spacing

  10. Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Plant Care: Water, Light, Nutrients

    0.8 cups. every 12 days. Gray Ghost Organ Pipe needs 0.8 cups of water every 12 days when it doesn't get direct sunlight and is potted in a 5.0" pot. Use our water calculator to personalize watering recommendations to your environment or download Greg for more advanced recommendations for all of your plants. Water 0.8 cups every.

  11. Types Of Stenocereus Cacti: Information About Stenocereus Cactus

    Gray ghost organ pipe Candelabra Such names give an insight into their various, wildly interesting forms. Most develop ribbed, long stems with almost sinuous beauty. After the rainy season, large brightly colored to white flowers are produced followed by spiny fruit. Growing Stenocereus Cacti Stenocereus cacti hail from arid regions.

  12. Browsing: Gray Ghost Organ Pipe

    Stenocereus pruinosus (Gray Ghost Organ Pipe) is a large shrubby or tree-like cactus with a distinct trunk from which the branching stems…. View Plant Details. Explore our list of succulents commonly known as "Gray Ghost Organ Pipe," each with a plant profile, including care tips and photos. The list is being continually expanded.

  13. Stenocereus pruinosus "Gray Ghost Organ Pipe"

    Stenocereus pruinosus (gray ghost organ pipe) is a powdery, gray columnar cactus that grows to 20' in height in time. White nocturnal flower. Native habitat is Puebla, Mexico. Protect from frost. Provide bright light/sun; hardy to 32F. SURVIVE & THRIVE Recommended pairings: coming soon Bloom time: Summer Size: Up to 2' wide and 20' tall

  14. Creekside Nursery

    Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus. This large, shrubby columnar cactus becomes tall dark green with age but is a nice powdery blue gray when young. They will nocturnally produce small white flowers that have a pink tinge and following the flowers are very large edible fruits about the size of a small apple that will change color from yellow, orange-green to a purple.

  15. Mexican Ghost Pipe Cactus, Stenocereus thurberi

    The Mexican Ghost Pipe Cactus, also known as Organ Pipe, is a fruit-bearing cactus that produces sweet deep pinkish-purple fruit known as Pitahaya Dulce. Large, gorgeous flower buds in lavender, pale white, and pink will open for weeks at a time. Flowers usually open and are pollinated at night.

  16. Organ Pipe Cactus

    The organ pipe cactus, or chuhuis, was a survival tool that provided construction material and high calorie fruit that could easily be turned into preserves, syrup, and wine. It's a time of great joy when the harvest season arrives.

  17. Stenocereus pruinosis

    An interesting tropical cactus also called the 'Gray Ghost organ pipe' that occurs in many different areas of Mexico, this species is a columnar cacti with bluish-green coloration and a dusty-looking coating of white powder on new growth. It features white flowers that bloom both day and night to allow for pollination 24-hours a day, and ...

  18. Ravelry: Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus pattern by Jana Whitley

    The "gray ghost" part of this plant's name refers to its dusty gray-green color; the "organ pipe" moniker refers to the look of the mature wild plant: the tall, vertical, uniform columns of closely bunched trunks are reminiscent of a medieval church organ. In the wilds of Mexico, this cactus can grow up to 16 feet (4.9 m) tall. This small household yarn version is five inches tall ...

  19. Stenocereus Pruinosus "Gray Ghost Organ Pipe" Cactus

    Frequently bought together, Stenocereus Pruinosus "Gray Ghost Organ Pipe" Cactus - 2.5 inch Potted Cacti Succulent. 100+ bought since yesterday, Miracle-Gro Cactus, Palm & Citrus Potting Mix, $5.74, was $24.15, rated 4.4 of out 5 stars from 910 reviews. 100+ bought since yesterday.

  20. Grey Ghost Organ Pipe, Stenocereus Pruinosus, Rare Cactus in 6" pot

    Stenocereus pruinosus, commonly known as the Grey Ghost Organ Pipe or Pitayo, is a cactus species native to Mexico, particularly the states of Oaxaca, Puebla, and Veracruz. It's known for its columnar growth habit, with stems that can reach up to 5 meters tall and 10-15 centimeters in diameter.

  21. Gray Ghost Cactus Organ Pipe Succulent , Pitayo, Pitaya of October Mei

    GET 10% OFF. Tis cactus comes from Central and South America, in particular to Mexico. Their habitat usually consists in the sunniest parts of rocky cliffs, in arid lands, when they form populations of more or less branched individuals. Some species, instead, tend to be more solitary. They are columnar or creeping cacti, not so bra.

  22. Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus

    Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus (1 - 30 of 30 results) Price ($) Shipping Stenocereus pruinosus, Gray Ghost Organ Pipe, cactus, succulent, live plant DesertNoir (4,767) $20.99 FREE shipping stenocereus pruinosus gray ghost organ pipe DoseofSucculents (13,268) $450.00 Stenocereus Pruinosus - Gray Ghost Organ Pipe Cactus Live Plant PlantsFromHome

  23. Tall Cactus Types: [Top 20 With Pictures]

    1. Mexican Fence Post Cactus 2. Blue Myrtle Cactus 3. Candelabra Cactus 4. Organ Pipe Cactus 5. Blue Columnar Cactus 6. Mexican Giant Cardon Cactus 7. Barrel Cactus 8. Old Man Cactus 9. Saguaro Cactus 10. Eves Needle Cactus 11. Senita Cactus 12. Totem Pole Cactus 13 Giant Club Cactus 14. Cleistocactus Strausii 15. African Milk Tree 16.

  24. AGAVE EXPEDITIONS on Instagram: "UNESCO World Heritage Site San

    147 likes, 5 comments - baja_agave_expeditions on December 29, 2023: "UNESCO World Heritage Site San Francisco de la Sierra Here we camped out at a ranch enjoying the..."