Privacy notice

The Mariners' Museum and Park

The Mariners’ Museum and Park Logo

Site Search

Popular searches.

  • Chris-Craft
  • USS Monitor

Popular pages

  • Plan Your Visit
  • Events & Exhibits
  • Student Programs
  • Volunteers & Interns
  • USS Monitor Center

A Haunting in Hampton Roads: The Ghost Fleet on the James River

Published October 26, 2021

A few weeks ago, on a late summer boat ride on the James River, I noticed the outlines of looming grey ships in the distance that I hadn’t seen before. “What are those?” I wondered aloud. “Oh, that’s the ghost fleet” my fiancé, piloting the boat, responded, “you haven’t heard of them before?” On that chilly evening in September, as I glanced over my shoulder back at the mysterious vessels, it all seemed a little spooky to me. As the sun set over the water, the creaky grey ships appeared hazy, almost like a figment of my imagination. From our vantage point on the dock in Williamsburg, the screams from nearby Busch Gardens roller coasters echoing in the background, it seemed like the perfect set for a Halloween movie. Call me dramatic, but I was intrigued to learn a little more about these ghostly vessels. A week before Halloween, this seemed like an appropriate time to share my maritime “ghost story” with you, dear readers!

the ghost fleet james river

The “Ghost Fleet”, although perhaps a fitting name, is a colloquial name for what is officially the James River Reserve Fleet (JRRF), the oldest of the eight original National Defense Reserve Fleet (NDRF) sites, and one of only three that are still in operation. The NDRF is overseen by the U.S. Maritime Administration, a division of the U.S. Department of Transportation. Since 1919, the James River has been a resting place (or perhaps a graveyard?) for retired ships. After World War I, the Navy and Merchant Marines stored their surplus wooden and steel-hulled ships in the river. Many of the wooden-hulled ships were eventually moved to Mallows Bay, Maryland [1]. By the advent of World War II, nearly 300 ships sat in the James River Reserve Fleet (JRRF), although they were all reactivated to serve in the conflict. After this, in 1946, Section 11 of the Merchant Ship Sales Act established that the National Defense Reserve Fleet would serve as a sort of insurance policy, a stand-by armada of ships in times of national crisis. Ships re-entered the JRRF after World War II, and by 1950, between 700 and 800 ships were anchored in the James River. [2]

the ghost fleet james river

Today, less than ten ships make up the Ghost Fleet. So, what happened to the hundreds of ships that made up the original ghost fleet? Did they suddenly vanish into thin air or sail off by themselves? (Just kidding.) Over the years, some have been removed for historic preservation, some were sold, others broken up for parts, and a few were sunk off the coast as an artificial reef [3]. Many became scrap metal or were repurposed [4].

The Ghost Fleet’s presence in the James River has not been without controversy. Environmental groups have raised concern over the decades about the potential risks of these ships sitting stagnant. If something were to happen, and the ships were to break down in the water, gallons of oil and chemicals would leach into the nearby waterways and wetlands, destroying habitats and causing environmental damage. In the early 2000s, nearly 13 million gallons of oil and fuel filled the vessels, as well as asbestos and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) [5]. The former executive director of the James River Association Patricia A. Jackson described the ghost fleet as “ticking time bombs.” [6] The potential disaster if one of the ships were to be destroyed while in the water has been described in vivid detail:

“Two rusty cargo ships anchored side-by-side in the James River Reserve Fleet rip open in a major storm. More than 282,000 gallons of heavy oil, as dark and thick as molasses, pour into the James [River]. Within 48 hours, a black blanket of petroleum washes north onto Jamestown Island, a national landmark. Across the river, the sticky oil laps against an intake pipe that draws cooling water for the Surry nuclear power plant. The spill also rolls south to the tip of Newport News and Portsmouth. Along the way, it soils sandy beaches, state wildlife sanctuaries, a historical park, prime bird and duck habitat, scenic waterfront properties, oyster seed grounds, clam beds, inland creeks and tidal marshes.” [7]

A scenario like that sounds like a dystopian horror story that matches the scary name of this fleet! Fortunately, nothing of that caliber ever occurred, even when there were hundreds of ships in the river, but the threat remained imminent. During the late 1990s and the early 2000s, smaller spills occurred that sparked interest in removing the ghost fleet from the river. The largest spill occurred in August of 2000, when USS Donner leaked 1,000 gallons of oil into the James River, prompting then-governor of Virginia Mark Warner to threaten to sue the U.S. Maritime Administration to have the ships removed [8]. Congress ordered the Maritime Administration to remove the backlog of ships within six years, however lack of funding prevented this goal from being actualized. Instead, the Maritime Administration began tightening up inspections and removing the most hazardous ships [9]. Under the George W. Bush Administration, money was allocated to scrap some vessels domestically. By 2009, a large number of ships had departed the Ghost Fleet, leaving only 26 vessels that were not deemed high risk [10].

Over the past decade, the remaining ships have slowly been sold off or repurposed, reducing the size of the Ghost Fleet by more than half. The most recent departures have been USS Sturgis in 2015, and Suribachi in 2019, both sold to Texas companies [11].

If you want to experience the spookiness of the Ghost Fleet yourself, now armed with its true history to ward off any ghost stories you may have heard, you will have to do it from a distance. The Maritime Administration has established that river-goers may only come within 500 feet of the fleet, as underwater power cables and anchor lines make sailing any closer hazardous [12]. If you happen to have access to a boat, however, getting close enough to see the Ghost Fleet is a fun, if slightly exhilarating outing!

While the story of the Ghost Fleet is not a ghost story in the traditional sense, some detective work was required to shine light on a maritime mystery of Hampton Roads! The deserted, disappearing ships may not actually be haunted, but they do cast eerie shadows of various wars, potential natural disasters, and political strife. Thank you for reading, and I hope you enjoyed this peek into lesser known Hampton Roads history!

1 “James River Reserve Fleet” (2020) U.S. Department of Transportation Maritime Administration.

3 Mackenzie Walter. “Haunted Hampton Roads: James River ‘Ghost Fleet’” WTKR. (Norfolk, VA) October 28, 2015.

4 Scott Harper. “Ghost Fleet Haunts the James River” The Virginian Pilot. (Norfolk, VA) October 31, 2010.

5 L. Christopher Noland. “The Ghouls That Won’t Go Away: The Dire Environmental Consequences Posed by the Ghost Fleet in the James River” 30 Wm. & Mary Envtl. L. & Pol’y Rev. 513 (2006). 513. https://scholarship.law.wm.edu/wmelpr/vol30/iss2/6.

6 Scott Harper, ‘Ghost Fleet’ Could Unleash Disastrous Spill in a storm, The Virginian Pilot , (Norfolk, VA) April 7, 2002

8 L. Christopher Noland. “The Ghouls That Won’t Go Away: The Dire Environmental Consequences Posed by the Ghost Fleet in the James River” 30 Wm. & Mary Envtl. L. & Pol’y Rev. 514.

9 Tamara Dietrich “Ghost Fleet is shrinking, but not going away” The Daily Press. (Newport News, VA) July 12, 2015.

11 Hugh Lessig “Unique James River Reserve Fleet ship USS Sturgis leaves for Texas” The Baltimore Sun . (Baltimore, MD) April 16, 2015. “James River Ghost Fleet loses another ship” Richmond Times Dispatch. (2019)

12 Scott Harper. “Ghost Fleet Haunts the James River” The Virginian Pilot. (Norfolk, VA) October 31, 2010.

Share this:

An official website of the United States government Here's how you know

Official websites use .gov A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS A lock ( Lock A locked padlock ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

Site Notification

James river reserve fleet.

the ghost fleet james river

The James River Reserve Fleet (JRRF) is an anchorage of the  National Defense Reserve Fleet  (NDRF) located on the James River at Fort Eustis, Virginia. It is the oldest of the original eight NDRF fleet sites and is currently one of three that is still in operation.

A reserve fleet of wood- and steel-hulled ships was established at Fort Eustis, then Camp Eustis, as far back as World War I; the fleet was also used for inactive vessel lay-up following the war. Many of the wood-hulled ships were later  removed to Mallows Bay, Maryland . At the start of World War II, there were nearly 300 ships at JRRF, although all vessels were activated at the start of the war.

Section 11 of the Merchant Ship Sales Act of 1946 established the National Defense Reserve Fleet (NDRF) to serve as a reserve of ships for national defense and national emergencies and the James River reserve anchorage became part of the NDRF. Vessels began re-entering JRRF shortly after the war’s end, and the fleet reached its peak size in 1950 with nearly 800 ships.

In addition to the  Ready Reserve Force  (RRF), the NDRF consists of a variety of obsolete commercial vessels awaiting disposal. The NDRF also hosts many decommissioned U.S. Navy auxiliary vessels. These vessels arrive at the fleet at the end of their military usefulness, and are typically transferred by the U.S. Navy to the Maritime Administration (MARAD) for disposal.

JRRF currently hosts non-retention, retention, and reimbursable custody vessels. Non-retention vessels are those that the MARAD has deemed to no longer be militarily useful. Retention vessels are maintained for logistics support, training use, or long term activation. Reimbursable custody vessels are non-NDRF government vessels (such as those owned by the U.S. Amy, Navy, Coast Guard, or the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) that are stored at each fleet site in exchange for a maintenance fee.

3 WTKR Coastal VA | Northeast NC

Haunted Hampton Roads: James River ‘Ghost Fleet’

the ghost fleet james river

NEWPORT NEWS, Va. - The old, abandoned ships anchored off the coast of Newport News have been a site of mystery since 1919.

After World War I, the Navy and Merchant Marines had extra ships in the James River and had no place to put them.

Officially known as the James River Reserve Fleet, people sometimes refer to is as the 'Ghost Fleet' as the ships numbers continue to dwindle.

Click here to explore the rest of our Haunted Hampton Roads segments

Overseen by the U.S. Maritime Administration, the fleet had almost 800 ships at its peak in 1950.

Now, only nine remain after years and years of ships coming and going for various reasons.

Aerial view of the James River 'Ghost Fleet'

Some were sold to foreign governments, some were broken down and used for parts, a few were sunk off of the coast as an artificial reef.

The fleet is made up of decommissioned naval ships, obsolete commercial vessels, and some retention crafts maintained for potential logistic support.

Although people are curious about the potential hauntings and stories that may come with the 'Ghost Fleet' and the thousands of sailors who were once on board, there has been little progress trying to get any information or conduct any research.

Maybe that's why it's so mysterious?!

Complete coverage of Halloween 2016

Sign up for the Headlines Newsletter and receive up to date information.

Now signed up to receive the headlines newsletter..

the ghost fleet james river

Special Coverage: First Warning to Winter Weather

The Virginian-Pilot

Ghost Fleet haunts the James River

Share this:.

  • Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on X (Opens in new window)

e-Pilot Evening Edition

  • Things to do

Author

ON THE JAMES RIVER

Armed with a pot of chili, some cameras and a notebook, we set out in a 36-foot power boat amid sunshine and fair seas Thursday afternoon in search of any spirits that might be hiding within the Ghost Fleet.

Formally known as the James River Reserve Fleet, this collection of creaky ships is the epitome of spookiness, an ideal set for a Hollywood horror show: empty hulks anchored alone and far from shore, abandoned corridors, greasy engine rooms in pitch-black, rust stains like dripping blood, frayed ropes that resemble Spanish moss swaying in the breeze.

With Halloween approaching, it seemed the perfect place to camp out and experience at night.

So we did, four of us: myself, a photographer, our captain, and a curious friend looking for adventure. The government caretaker of the Ghost Fleet, the U.S. Maritime Administration, agreed to let us spend the night on the river, but required we stay at least 500 feet away from the ships, for safety reasons. Beneath the fleet, there are underwater power cables and anchor lines that criss-cross the bottom of the James like a spider web – dangers to be avoided.

We parked in a sheltered corner of the fleet, near a lonely cargo ship named the Cape Ann, which stood silently by herself. The other ships are lashed together in groups of two, three or five, head to tail, like sardines in a can.

Some of the windows on the Cape Ann’s bridge were broken out and we joked about the prospects of seeing a pale creepy face peek out around midnight.

We had arrived at the fleet, off Fort Eustis in Newport News, just before sunset. The sky was a spectacular pink when we noticed something weird – our first weird thing of the trip. The sunset was beaming light at just the right angle to color two of the Cape Ann’s windows red, like two angry eyes peering at us.

It was like those red eyes in the demon-possessed house in “The Amityville Horror.”

Our photographer went nuts, capturing frame after frame. Within minutes, though, the pink light changed angle and the windows went black and lifeless. The eyes had closed.

The James River Reserve Fleet has been a source of fascination, history and lore for decades. Its roots trace to 1919, just after World War I, when the Navy and Merchant Marine began mothballing their surplus ships within the river, not sure where else to put them.

At its peak, following World War II, the fleet held more than 700 ships, stretching in a line almost to Norfolk.

In the years since, disposing of those vessels deemed useless and obsolete became an exercise in imagination: the Korean War took a few, and others were spot-welded into giant paperweights for atomic bomb testing in the Pacific. The Navy practiced underwater demolition on some, and laws were passed allowing states to take hulls and turn them into offshore reefs.

Many others were converted to scrap. And in 1964, more than 120 Liberty ships became silos, their holds filled with surplus wheat that the government had bought to support grain prices.

Vietnam took more ships, and by the 1970s, the fleet had been whittled to about 300. About this time, media began calling the reserve fleet the “Ghost Fleet” and the name stuck – as it did on other federal stockpiles in New York, California and elsewhere.

The Maritime Administration has never been fond of the nickname. A manager complained to a reporter in a 1980 newspaper story, “Please don’t refer to it as the Ghost Fleet, all right?”

For this story, the Maritime Administration declined to comment on the notion of “ghost ships” and said workers who maintain the fleet did not want to talk about their experiences aboard the ships.

One agency official, Willie Barnes, did relate a recent ghost tale. He said a James River ship, after being towed to a scrap yard for dismantling, had one of its interior doors abruptly close and lock – much to the surprise of a laborer walking down a nearby corridor.

Today, the fleet consists of just 23 ships, its smallest size ever. More than 80 junk ships have been removed and recycled since 2001, the push coming after Congress imposed a deadline of 2006 for getting rid of the vessels most likely to leak or spill oil.

Environmental groups had wanted to accelerate the disposal program, worried that used oil and fuel, asbestos, lead, mercury and toxic PCBs in paint and wiring might damage the James in an accident or major hurricane.

During a tour, former Gov. Mark Warner, now a U.S. senator, called the ships “ticking time bombs” and pressured for their hastened removal.

We kept a close eye on the Cape Ann and other ships as nightfall spread. We hoped to see something bizarre.

Sitting there in the quiet, the great ships now in silhouette, we could not help but think of things unexplained – UFOs, chilling experiences, the occult, brushes with ghosts. So we kind of made ourselves scared, or at least on edge.

On the water, there are lights all around and we kept trying to identify them – the James River Bridge, downtown Norfolk, a channel marker. We never could figure out one: a round and unblinking light, on the far side of the Ghost Fleet and definitely not on land.

About then, we decided to go swimming. And soon the talk turned to scary creatures in the water – sharks, eels, sturgeon – that might drag us under.

Our plan was to stay awake until at least midnight, the witching hour. Three of our team did not make it; I did. Just after midnight, a boat slowly cruised past the far end of the fleet and began flashing a spotlight on the sides of ships, scanning for something or someone.

Then, it was gone.

There have been many books written about ghosts in Virginia and many investigations of alleged local hauntings. The Ghost Fleet, though, has escaped such scrutiny.

L.B. Taylor Jr. has written several volumes of his popular “The Ghosts of Virginia” series, but he never has managed to dig up anything on the fleet.

“It’s always sounded like a great place for ghosts to go,” Taylor said by phone from his Williamsburg home. “I’ve tried to look into it, but have never had much luck.”

About the closest thing, he said, were stories of ghosts knocking on the roofs of James River oystermen near Fort Eustis, whispering locations where they should next go fishing.

A local ghost hunter, Mike Joao, who runs the company Virginia Paranormal, has been intrigued by the fleet but has never scouted for ghosts there.

He has captured photos of veiled images aboard the Battleship North Carolina, anchored in Wilmington, N.C. Joao said the images appear to be of a Navy sailor crawling from a bunk in one of the old sleeping quarters.

He hopes to do a similar investigation on the Battleship Wisconsin in Norfolk.

Our calm, peaceful night was interrupted by a cold front slamming into us after 2 a.m. The dark and stormy night had arrived. White caps hammered our slumber.

Our captain, a former Coast Guard officer, decided to motor home rather than risk a problem in the waves. Except he could barely see, the windshield wiper broken and water splashing across his view.

The voyage back was treacherous but ultimately successful. We slept hard after tying up at our marina in Norfolk, almost two hours after leaving the storm-tossed fleet.

We woke to a sunny new day, a crisp fall day.

Halloween would soon be here.

Scott Harper, (757) 446-2340, [email protected]

More in News

The entrance to the courthouse in Chesapeake.

Crime and Public Safety | Man pleads guilty to killing 2 Chesapeake city employees in 2021 high-speed crash

About 1 in 8 women experience symptoms of postpartum depression, federal data show.

Health | There’s a new pill for postpartum depression, but many at-risk women face hurdles

A federal judge is siding with the Biden administration and blocking JetBlue Airways from buying Spirit Airlines, saying the $3.8 billion deal would reduce competition. The Justice Department sued to block the merger, saying it would drive up fares by eliminating Spirit, the nation’s biggest low-cost airline. JetBlue argued that the deal would help consumers by making JetBlue a stronger competitor against bigger rivals that dominate the U.S. air-travel market. U.S. District Judge William Young, who presided over a non-jury trial last year, said in the ruling Tuesday that the government had proven “that the merger would substantially lessen competition in a relevant market.”

Business | JetBlue’s $3.8 billion buyout of Spirit Airlines is blocked by judge citing threat to competition

Trump, DeSantis and Haley are holding events in the first-in-the-nation GOP primary state.

National Politics | Live updates: Race for 2024 GOP presidential nomination pivots to New Hampshire

Trending nationally.

  • The Baltimore Sun purchased by Sinclair’s David D. Smith
  • Miss Colorado makes history as first active service member to be crowned Miss America
  • ‘Eighteen inches deep in muck’: Divers find missing people, hundreds of cars in South Florida canals, ponds
  • Reptile influencer Brian Barczyk dies from inoperable pancreatic cancer
  • US airlines cancel another 1200 flights Tuesday

Daily Press

Ghost Fleet is shrinking, but not going away

Share this:.

  • Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on X (Opens in new window)

Evening Edition

  • Things to do

An aerial view of the Ready Reserve Fleet based on...

Adrin Snider / Daily Press

An aerial view of the Ready Reserve Fleet based on the James River off of Ft. Eustis on July 8, 2015. Shown from the left are Cape Alava, Cape Archway, Cape Alexander, Cape Juby, Cape Nome, and Cape Johnson and State of Maine (lower right)

An aerial view of the Ready Reserve Fleet on the...

An aerial view of the Ready Reserve Fleet on the James River on July 8, 2015. Shown from left are Cape Johnson, Cape Nome, Cape Juby, Cape Alexander, Cape Archway, Cape Alava, Cape Avinof (foreground) State of Maine (back white) and Cape Ann (far right).

An aerial view of the Ready Reserve Fleet based on...

An aerial view of the Ready Reserve Fleet based on the James River off of Ft. Eustis on July 8, 2015. Shown are the Cape Alava, Cape Archway, Cape Alexander, and Cape Juby

Capt. Wilson "Zig" Ziegenbein of the Cornhusker State, one of...

Joe Fudge / Daily Press

Capt. Wilson "Zig" Ziegenbein of the Cornhusker State, one of three crane ships docked in downtown Newport News, stands inside the crew's quarters during a tour of the Ready Reserve Cornhusker State T-ACS 6.

Cape Alava, Cape Archway and Cape Nome are part of...

Cape Alava, Cape Archway and Cape Nome are part of only nine ships that remain in the Ghost Fleet (James River Reserve Fleet) at Ft. Eustis. Most of the ships have been shipped out for disposal, but others remain and will be kept for parts and training platforms.

Crew aboard the Cape Ann ship of the James River...

Crew aboard the Cape Ann ship of the James River Reserve Fleet work to repair electric power lines that power the ships. Only nine ships remain in the Ghost Fleet (James River Reserve Fleet) at Ft. Eustis. Most of the ships have been shipped out for disposal, but others remain and will be kept for parts and training platforms.

An aerial view of the Ready Reserve Fleet based on...

An aerial view of the Ready Reserve Fleet based on the James River off of Ft. Eustis on July 8, 2015. Shown are Cape Alava, Cape Archway, Cape Alexander, Cape Juby Cape Nome, and Cape Johnson.

A Boatswain oversees work on the large hatches that cover...

A Boatswain oversees work on the large hatches that cover the cargo holes on the Gopher State, one of three crane ships docked in downtown Newport News, during a tour of the Ready Reserve Cornhusker State T-ACS 6.

Cape Avinof, Cape Alava, Cape Archway, Cape Alexander and Cape...

Cape Avinof, Cape Alava, Cape Archway, Cape Alexander and Cape Juby are a part of only nine ships that remain in the Ghost Fleet (James River Reserve Fleet) at Ft. Eustis. Most of the ships have been shipped out for disposal, but others remain and will be kept for parts and training platforms.

Crew on the Gopher State, one of three crane ships...

Crew on the Gopher State, one of three crane ships docked in downtown Newport News, work on the large hatches that cover the ship's cargo holes during a tour of the Ready Reserve Cornhusker State T-ACS 6.

Cape Alava, Cape Archway, Cape Alexander and Cape Juby are...

Cape Alava, Cape Archway, Cape Alexander and Cape Juby are part of only nine ships that remain in the Ghost Fleet (James River Reserve Fleet) at Ft. Eustis. Most of the ships have been shipped out for disposal, but others remain and will be kept for parts and training platforms.

Crew aboard the Cape Ann ship of the James River...

Tour of the Ready Reserve Cornhusker State T-ACS 6. One of three Crane Ships docked in downtown Newport News. Looking over the decks of the three ships docked in Newport New showing their massive cranes that their use to unload the cargo and containers. L to R's Cornhusker State, Gopher State and Flickertail State.

The State of Maine ship is a part of only...

The State of Maine ship is a part of only nine ships that remain in the Ghost Fleet (James River Reserve Fleet) at Ft. Eustis. Most of the ships have been shipped out for disposal, but others remain and will be kept for parts and training platforms.

Jonathan Sprague, Chief Engineer on the Cornhusker State, shows off...

Jonathan Sprague, Chief Engineer on the Cornhusker State, shows off one of the control panels in the engine room during a tour of the Ready Reserve Cornhusker State T-ACS 6.

Cape Alava and the State of Maine ship are part...

Cape Alava and the State of Maine ship are part of only nine ships that remain in the Ghost Fleet (James River Reserve Fleet) at Ft. Eustis. Most of the ships have been shipped out for disposal, but others remain and will be kept for parts and training platforms.

Cape Juby, Cape Alexander, Cape Archway and Cape Alava are...

Cape Juby, Cape Alexander, Cape Archway and Cape Alava are part of only nine ships that remain in the Ghost Fleet (James River Reserve Fleet) at Ft. Eustis. Most of the ships have been shipped out for disposal, but others remain and will be kept for parts and training platforms.

Containers rest inside the cargo area on the Cornhusker State,...

Containers rest inside the cargo area on the Cornhusker State, one of three crane ships docked in downtown Newport News.

An aerial view of the Ready Reserve Fleet on the...

An aerial view of the Ready Reserve Fleet on the James River on July 8, 2015. Shown are the Cape Alava, Cape Archway, Cape Alexander, Cape Juby, Cape Nome, Cape Johnson, and Cape Avinof (back right)

An aerial view of the Ready Reserve Fleet based on...

An aerial view of the Ready Reserve Fleet based on the James River off of Ft. Eustis on July 8, 2015. Shown from left to right are the Cape Alava, Cape Archway, Cape Alexander, Cape Juby, Cape Avinof (back right) Cape Nome, and Cape Johnson.

An aerial view of the Ready Reserve Fleet on the...

An aerial view of the Ready Reserve Fleet on the James River on July 8, 2015.Shown from top to bottom are Cape Johnson, Cape Nome, Cape Juby, Cape Alexander, Cape Archway, and Cape Alava

An aerial view of the Ready Reserve Fleet on the...

An aerial view of the Ready Reserve Fleet on the James River on July 8, 2015. Shown are the Cape Alava, Cape Archway, Cape Alexander, Cape Juby, Cape Nome and Cape Johnson.

An aerial view of the Ready Reserve Fleet based on...

An aerial view of the Ready Reserve Fleet based on the James River off of Ft. Eustis on July 8, 2015. Shown are Cape Alava, Cape Archway, Cape Alexander, and Cape Juby.

Cape Alava, Cape Archway and Cape Alexander are part of...

Cape Alava, Cape Archway and Cape Alexander are part of only nine ships that remain in the Ghost Fleet (James River Reserve Fleet) at Ft. Eustis. Most of the ships have been shipped out for disposal, but others remain and will be kept for parts and training platforms.

An aerial view of the Ready Reserve Fleet based on...

An aerial view of the Ready Reserve Fleet based on the James River off of Ft. Eustis on July 8, 2015. Shown is the Cape Ann.

Author

The young Marine in the black T-shirt, camo pants and brimmed cap settled his backpack on the deck of a 41-foot boat in the James River off Fort Eustis. He wore black mirrored sunglasses like a mask.

He declined to give his name, only his rank: staff sergeant.

Asked how many of the dozen other young men on the boat were part of his group — a “force protection” military training exercise just underway — the staff sergeant smiled and said, “There’s nobody on the boat right now.”

His T-shirt bore a skull insignia with seven fading stars in front and the words “Til Valhalla” in back. In memory, he said, of the seven Marines who died when a helicopter crashed during a training exercise in March off the Florida Panhandle.

And that’s as personal as the staff sergeant gets.

The others wore a motley mix of clothing, from full camouflage to anonymous T-shirts and jeans. One sported a full beard. They toted heavy packs, water bottles and jugs, coolers and a decided cloak of reserve.

Once the boat drew alongside the Cape Avinof, one of nine aging military vessels still left in the dwindling James River Reserve Fleet, the men shouldered their packs and stepped single-file onto the ship’s ladder, then up two stories or more to the main deck and disappeared.

The scenario was routine for fleet superintendent Martin Walker. For years, the U.S. military has increasingly booked time on his vessels for role-playing exercises, he said, from force protection to search-and-seizure, from hostage rescue to helicopter approach-and-hover.

“We’ve had just about every service here, except for the Air Force,” Walker said. “A ship is an entirely different environment. Things that are land structures aren’t always translatable to a ship — steep ladders and key places on a ship that you need to get to to take control of it. Having a ship like that, that you can train on, is a big plus to them.”

Other agencies train there, too — the FBI, local law enforcement, firefighters. Walker’s office logs about 6,000 training days each year, or one day of training per person.

“So that gives you an idea of the activity that we see,” he said.

Birth of the Ghost Fleet

Training exercises are one way the federal government tries to keep its National Defense Reserve Fleet (NDRF) — which includes the fleet in the James River — relevant and worth its keep.

The national reserve fleet was formally established in 1946 by the U.S. Maritime Administration, or MARAD, to keep and maintain surplus ships for national defense and emergency response. MARAD is an arm of the U.S. Department of Transportation.

But the James River fleet actually predates the formal NDRF by three decades. In 1916, the country began using the James to store ships being mass-produced in preparation for entry into the Great War then raging in Europe.

It was around that time the term “Ghost Fleet” was first used, said Jeffrey J. McMahon, Norfolk-based operations officer for MARAD’s entire Atlantic division. Not because the ships were essentially dead in the water, he said, but for the eerie look of them when caught in a low-hanging fog bank.

After World War I, hundreds of ships were anchored in the James. Many remained until World War II when all the vessels were reactivated, leaving the anchorage empty from 1940 to 1945. As that war ended, ships began to return, Walker said, until by 1946 about 850 vessels were packed in cramped rows stretching for miles from above Deep Water Shoals Light to Burwell Bay.

Vessels have cycled in and out over the years, sold off to foreign governments at times or cannibalized for parts, said Walker. About 2,000 have come and gone in the James River fleet alone.

And when they finally outlive any useful purpose, the ships get broken down for scrap, recycled or, in a few cases, sunk off a coast as an artificial reef. Some are scuttled in weapons testing.

At its height in 1950, the national reserve fleet held 2,277 vessels at eight anchorages around the country, including Fort Eustis.

Today, only three anchorages remain: Fort Eustis; Beaumont, Texas; and Suisun Bay in Benicia, Calif. By the end of May there were only 100 vessels left, nine of them in the James.

Only four of the James River vessels are marked for retention — for training or logistics purposes — while the rest are slated for disposal.

But experts say it doesn’t mean the fleet will disappear entirely, and in fact it could expand as federal defense cuts and a trimmed-down military signal more military vessels might get mothballed.

“Is it the right size now? Yeah,” said Paul Gilmour, deputy director of MARAD’s Office of Ship Operations in D.C. “Is there a potential to grow again? Absolutely. Certainly when we see the Navy’s talking about cutting back, there’s large potential that some of those ships will end up there.”

Ready Reserve Force

While the fleet has supported every war effort since it began, the country decided it also needed a smaller, more nimble fleet capable of deploying fast to support the military in a crisis anywhere in the world.

So in 1976 MARAD established the Ready Reserve Force (RRF), a subset of the larger national reserve fleet but operated along with the U.S. Department of Defense, which funds it. For FY2015, the DOD budgeted $291 million, which MARAD says also funds the larger NDRF.

The RRF began with six merchant ships out-boarded to various ports. It peaked at 102 ships in 1994, and today has 47 ships. They provide a broad mix of support, including roll-on/roll-off transport, tanker storage, aviation repair and homeland security training.

Three of those ready reserve ships are berthed at a pier at the southern tip of Newport News.

Built in the late ’60s and early ’70s as commercial container vessels, the Cornhusker State, Flickertail State and Gopher State were converted to crane ships — portable ports that can deploy in five rapid-fire days to replace ports wiped out by war or natural disaster.

“When my phone rings, these ships have to be underway in 96 hours and finish the sea trial in 120 hours,” said McMahon.

The crane ships are massive — and unique. Unlike commercial versions, their cranes are fixed to the side of the vessel. This allows them to offload other container ships in a damaged port, such as when Kuwaiti ports were sabotaged during the first Gulf War, McMahon said.

It was one of Newport News’ crane ships that conducted a secret voyage in 2008 to transport yellowcake uranium out of Iraq, he said. In 1990, the Flickertail and the Gopher took U.S. military weapons out of Germany during reunification.

“A lot of commercial operators are a little squeamish about letting their ships be used for those kinds of things,” McMahon said.

The MARAD fleet is also deployed on humanitarian missions, including to Haiti after its devastating earthquake, New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina and New York after Superstorm Sandy.

Wilson “Zig” Ziegenbein is captain of the Cornhusker and its retention crew of nine merchant mariners. When the ship is deployed, however, his crew will swell to about two dozen in two or three days.

“I kind of think of this fleet as … kind of like the firemen of the merchant marine,” Ziegenbein said. “We sit around here in the station and we’re ready to go. Push the button and we’re gone. So wherever something comes up anywhere in the world, or you need stuff moved, we’re the guys.”

Ready reserve ships get surprise activation notices four or five times a year, McMahon said. Each time, they may have to activate as many as 12 vessels simultaneously, get them out to sea for a day then return to report to the DOD.

“It keeps us on our toes,” McMahon said.

Reserve force ships will get a military detachment for security if needed, Ziegenbein said, but merchant mariners also get small-weapons training and a cache of firearms is kept onboard.

“We could at least try to defend ourselves against pirates,” the captain said.

He said he believes it was the Cornhusker whose crew once had to defend itself from a small boat attack during the Gulf War.

Other reserve force crews have had risky encounters, McMahon said, including coming under fire while evacuating the last 500 U.S. troops from Mogadishu, and again while in port in Haiti during a period of civil unrest.

The shrinking Ghost Fleet

When a ship in the Ghost Fleet needed scrapping, it used to be sent to Third World countries such as India or Bangladesh, where scrap yards had fewer qualms about what’s considered a dirty and dangerous industry.

Carcinogens such as asbestos and polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, are baked into the structure, and ships can also contain trace amounts of oil, lead and mercury.

But in 1993, after reports of environmental damage and even death at Third World shipyards, President Bill Clinton ordered a halt to exporting vessels for scrapping. For about a decade after, the Ghost Fleet began to build up, with most ships anchored off Fort Eustis.

In 2000, Congress ordered MARAD to get rid of the backlog within six years, but with limited funds and limited domestic ship-scrapping capacity, the maritime agency couldn’t meet that deadline. Instead, it began removing the most hazardous ships in the worst condition.

Meantime, concerns grew in Hampton Roads and among state leaders about the environmental dangers of keeping deteriorating vessels in the James River.

Under President George W. Bush, more money was allocated to scrap the vessels domestically. Depending on swings in the steel market over the years, MARAD was paying as much as $2 million for scrap yards to take a vessel off its hands, or was getting paid by salvage companies to do so, according to reports.

“That’s when you saw a whole bunch of those vessels suddenly leave,” said Kim Strong, a spokeswoman at MARAD. “And I think it gave the impression to people that the fleet was going away. But the fleet will never go away.”

By 2009, the disposal effort for the James River fleet was winding down, with only 26 vessels moored off Fort Eustis, none of them considered high-risk. Federal officials shifted their focus to reserve fleet ships off California.

Since then, McMahon said, MARAD has sold 50 obsolete vessels for recycling, providing nearly $16 million for its maritime academies, for ship repair, maintenance and fuel.

Upkeep and crew payroll on the James River fleet and the ready reserve ships in Newport News together generate about $20 million annually in economic activity for Hampton Roads, he said.

“Which, compared to the Department of Defense, is small,” McMahon said. “But, still, $20 million is $20 million.”

Dietrich can be reached by phone at 757-247-7892.

More in News

The entrance to the courthouse in Chesapeake.

Crime and Public Safety | Man pleads guilty to killing 2 Chesapeake city employees in 2021 high-speed crash

About 1 in 8 women experience symptoms of postpartum depression, federal data show.

Health | There’s a new pill for postpartum depression, but many at-risk women face hurdles

A federal judge is siding with the Biden administration and blocking JetBlue Airways from buying Spirit Airlines, saying the $3.8 billion deal would reduce competition.

Business | JetBlue’s $3.8 billion buyout of Spirit Airlines is blocked by judge citing threat to competition

Trump, DeSantis and Haley are holding events in the first-in-the-nation GOP primary state.

National Politics | Live updates: Race for 2024 GOP presidential nomination pivots to New Hampshire

Trending nationally.

  • The Baltimore Sun purchased by Sinclair’s David D. Smith
  • Miss Colorado makes history as first active service member to be crowned Miss America
  • ‘Eighteen inches deep in muck’: Divers find missing people, hundreds of cars in South Florida canals, ponds
  • Reptile influencer Brian Barczyk dies from inoperable pancreatic cancer
  • US airlines cancel another 1200 flights Tuesday

The Lay of the Land

American ship breaking.

Brownsville shipbreaking

PHOTOGRAPHS AND FILMS OF THE massive truncated hulks of scrapped ships beached on muddy Asian shores are among the most striking images of the contrasts of globalism. These images show people taking oil tankers apart by hand, and in bare feet. Somewhere around 90% of the world’s ship breaking takes place in this way in Pakistan (Gaddani Beach), Bangladesh (Chittagong) and in India. The biggest yard in the world is in Alang, India, in the State of Gujarat, where high tides enable ships to beach themselves under their own power, along a seven mile stretch of the nation’s west coast, and where up to 30,000 people work to take them apart. With aging fleets and increasing regulations in the West, the industry has moved to where labor is cheap, where environmental laws are still weak, and where the need for work, and steel, is high.

However, there are still are a few companies in the business in the United States. Though rules relating to the handling and disposal of the toxic materials that are built into old ships, including residual hydrocarbons, lead paint, asbestos, and PCBs, make the business run differently here then in the wild East ("ship breaking” is a term that is slowly being replaced by “ship recycling”). The industry is subsidized by the fact that federal policy prevents government ships from being scrapped by other countries, for the most part. With hundreds of such ships floating around the country, and around the globe, the domestic ship breaking industry is likely to continue.

In fact, ship breaking in the United States is booming at the moment, as congressional mandates to reduce the rotting hulks in the three Ghost Fleets of the nation are being implemented. These mothball fleets are composed primarily of US Maritime Administration (MARAD) reserve ships, initially kept in case they needed to be activated again for war. These reserve fleets started after WWII, the biggest ship-building boom in history. In 1950, there were over 2,000 surplus federal ships, tied together in slack water clusters around the nation. Over the years, they were redeployed, converted to commercial use, scrapped, or sunk offshore. Today, MARAD has less than 200 ships in their mothball fleets, still mostly WWII era cargo ships, cruisers, destroyers, and even aircraft carriers.

The James River Ghost Fleet, off the shore at Fort Eustis, Virginia, is providing the majority of the ship breaking work in the nation right now. This ghost fleet was once the largest in the nation, with more than 800 ships in storage after WWII, stored here because it was up the river from the East Coast hub of the Navy, and the water was brackish enough that corrosion from salt water would be minimized. By 2001, the fleet was down to 107 ships. It now has less than 25.

Some of the ships were reefed — adopted by states to sink offshore, a practice that stimulates reef formation, and provides destinations for scuba divers. Others have been sunk at sea in live-fire military training exercises. Most of the 70 ships that have been scrapped from the fleet in the past ten years were taken apart at one of three ship breaking yards in the USA, two of which are in the mid-Atlantic.

Bay Bridge Enterprises of Chesapeake, Virginia, operates a facility along the industrial estuaries that surround the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, one of several Naval bases in the region around the mouth of the James River, the Navy’s principal East Coast hub. Bay Bridge is capable of handling up to three ships at a time. The company has been owned by the Adani Group, an Indian industrial conglomerate, since 2005. The second mid-Atlantic ship breaking operation is at Sparrows Point, Maryland, the mostly defunct hyper-industrialized steel peninsula near Baltimore. Part of the shipyard at the plant, which once cranked out hundreds of steel-hulled ships, became a ship breaking yard. The yard, recently operated by North American Ship Recycling, shut down a few years ago, and may or may not open again.

The Brownsville Ship Channel, a straight cut 15 miles inland from the Gulf of Mexico

The third ship breaking site in the USA is at the very bottom of the country, in Brownsville, Texas, just a few miles from Mexico. This is where the vast majority of the nation’s federal ships are broken apart. A 15 mile-long channel, made from scratch from 1934-1936, connects the Port of Brownsville to the ocean, at South Padre Island. Built inland to protect the port from hurricanes, not much occurs along the channel’s first ten miles. The inland end of the channel is home to a modest amount of shipping terminals, taking advantage of the proximity to Mexico, three miles away. One of the largest oil platform manufacturing yards in the nation is the largest single tenant at the port, the AMFELS rig yard. But the ship breaking industry covers more land and shoreline of the Channel than any other activity.

ESCO is the largest shipbreaking company operating in the United States

Currently four companies are in the ship breaking business here, though Bay Bridge, from Virginia, is hoping to enter into the market here too. The largest of the companies is ESCO marine, which has dismantled more than 500 ships at this location. ESCO has three slots, which are long coves dug diagonally into the side of the channel, where the ships are grounded, that allow access to the ship for dismantling. The ships are not drydocked, for disassembly, they are beached inside the slot, sometimes two at a time. Often, as one shrinks as pieces are removed, another one comes in behind it, when there is room. The mouth of the slots are roped off with a booms to keep materials from escaping.

Ship on its last legs at ESCO

Between these slots at ESCO is an active 88 acre yard full of scrap piles, metal processing machinery, cranes, and processing areas where larger chunks of the ship have been removed and are being cut down on shore with torches and other equipment. ESCO has salvaged former offshore rigs as well. Across the channel from ESCO is the International Shipbreaking yard, with two slots, one of which is the largest of the seven that are currently active in Brownsville. The company says it has “the largest and most specialized facility for ship dismantling in the United States.” The facility is capable of handling up to nine vessels at a time, and accommodates ships up to 1,000 feet in length. This company has been active since 1995, and has plans to expand its facilities at Brownsville.

Next to the International Shipbreaking yard is the Marine Metals yard, with one slot. Across the channel, on the east side of the AMFELS yard is another slot, used by All-Star Metals, the fourth ship breaking company here.

International Shipbreaking

There are just over a dozen ships left in the Ghost Fleet at the northern end of Texas’ Gulf Coast, on the Neches River, near Beaumont, some of which are destined for Brownsville soon. The vast majority of ships are at the third remaining Reserve Fleet site, in the muddy Suisun Bay, east of San Francisco. With more than 60 ships remaining, Suisun Bay is now by far the largest Ghost Fleet in the nation. Located off the shore of Benecia, across from a former arsenal and a current oil refinery, the ships are tethered into seven clusters, and tended by service boats from a dedicated wharf. Ships are being removed from this site more slowly as there has been disagreements about how to prepare them for shipment to Brownsville.

Though the federal government was suggesting cleaning them on site in the Bay before shipment, state environmentalists disagreed. It has recently been decided that the ships will now be cleaned up in local dry docks to remove them of invasive species before heading out to sea. The three most recent ships selected for dismantling are being cleaned up at BAE systems, in San Francisco.

Meanwhile, some local companies are trying to win the scrap contracts away from Brownsville. These operations would occur at the Mare Island Shipyard, a massive former military shipyard with several drydocks, just a few miles away from Suisun Bay. These companies are working their way through the stringent California environmental regulatory permit process. But until and if these local companies are permitted, the ships of the Suisun Bay Ghost Fleet will make their last journey under tow, via the Panama Canal, all the way to Brownsville, where they will meet with their undoing.  ♦

ghost fleet

Jewish Encyclopedia of Russia Surnames starting with the letter P

Translated by josif and vitaly charny.

The following list is a translation of names and minimal personal data for 8,500 people included in Jewish Encyclopedia of Russia (Rossiyskaya Evreiskaya Entsiclopediya); first edition; 1995, Moscow.

Famous people who are listed in the book, which in fact is a biographical dictionary, were born in Russia, the USSR, the Russian Empire, or lived there. This is the first edition of this kind in Russia and a large group of specialists from Russia, Israel and other countries participated in the project.

There are many more well known people in Russia to be included in the next edition of the book. We have to remember that the success of many of these people was achieved against all odds related to limited opportunities that Jews had in Russia.

The translation is an attempt to inform people about this additional source available for researchers.

Vitaly Charny

A    B    C    D    E    F    G    H   I    J    K    L    M    N    O    P    Q   R    S    T    U    V    W    X   Y    Z   

JewishGen: Belarus SIG

Last modified February 4, 2020 Copyright © 2016-2020 Belarus SIG Web Design by Alan Raskin

Flag Counter

  • Nuclear fuel cycle
  • Key figures
  • History of cooperation
  • Areas of cooperation
  • Office profile
  • Procurement standard
  • Useful links
  • How to become a supplier
  • Procurement
  • Rosatom in media
  • Photo and video
  • Rosatom Newsletter
  • Anti-corruption policy

© 2008–2024 The State Atomic Energy Corporation ROSATOM

the ghost fleet james river

  • Rosatom Global presence
  • Rosatom in region
  • Regional office
  • For suppliers
  • Preventing corruption
  • Press centre

Rosatom starts production of rare-earth magnets for wind power generation

  • 05 November, 2020 / 18:04

This site uses cookies. By continuing your navigation, you accept the use of cookies. For more information, or to manage or to change the cookies parameters on your computer, read our Cookies Policy. Learn more

World Energy

Rosatom Starts Production of Rare-Earth Magnets for Wind Power Generation

TVEL Fuel Company of Rosatom has started gradual localization of rare-earth magnets manufacturing for wind power plants generators. The first sets of magnets have been manufactured and shipped to the customer.

the ghost fleet james river

In total, the contract between Elemash Magnit LLC (an enterprise of TVEL Fuel Company of Rosatom in Elektrostal, Moscow region) and Red Wind B.V. (a joint venture of NovaWind JSC and the Dutch company Lagerwey) foresees manufacturing and supply over 200 sets of magnets. One set is designed to produce one power generator.

“The project includes gradual localization of magnets manufacturing in Russia, decreasing dependence on imports. We consider production of magnets as a promising sector for TVEL’s metallurgical business development. In this regard, our company does have the relevant research and technological expertise for creation of Russia’s first large-scale full cycle production of permanent rare-earth magnets,” commented Natalia Nikipelova, President of TVEL JSC.

“NovaWind, as the nuclear industry integrator for wind power projects, not only made-up an efficient supply chain, but also contributed to the development of inter-divisional cooperation and new expertise of Rosatom enterprises. TVEL has mastered a unique technology for the production of magnets for wind turbine generators. These technologies will be undoubtedly in demand in other areas as well,” noted Alexander Korchagin, Director General of NovaWind JSC.

For reference:

TVEL Fuel Company of Rosatom incorporates enterprises for the fabrication of nuclear fuel, conversion and enrichment of uranium, production of gas centrifuges, as well as research and design organizations. It is the only supplier of nuclear fuel for Russian nuclear power plants. TVEL Fuel Company of Rosatom provides nuclear fuel for 73 power reactors in 13 countries worldwide, research reactors in eight countries, as well as transport reactors of the Russian nuclear fleet. Every sixth power reactor in the world operates on fuel manufactured by TVEL. www.tvel.ru

NovaWind JSC is a division of Rosatom; its primary objective is to consolidate the State Corporation's efforts in advanced segments and technological platforms of the electric power sector. The company was founded in 2017. NovaWind consolidates all of the Rosatom’s wind energy assets – from design and construction to power engineering and operation of wind farms.

Overall, by 2023, enterprises operating under the management of NovaWind JSC, will install 1 GW of wind farms. http://novawind.ru

Elemash Magnit LLC is a subsidiary of Kovrov Mechanical Plant (an enterprise of the TVEL Fuel Company of Rosatom) and its main supplier of magnets for production of gas centrifuges. The company also produces magnets for other industries, in particular, for the automotive

industry. The production facilities of Elemash Magnit LLC are located in the city of Elektrostal, Moscow Region, at the site of Elemash Machine-Building Plant (a nuclear fuel fabrication facility of TVEL Fuel Company).

Rosatom is a global actor on the world’s nuclear technology market. Its leading edge stems from a number of competitive strengths, one of which is assets and competences at hand in all nuclear segments. Rosatom incorporates companies from all stages of the technological chain, such as uranium mining and enrichment, nuclear fuel fabrication, equipment manufacture and engineering, operation of nuclear power plants, and management of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. Nowadays, Rosatom brings together about 350 enterprises and organizations with the workforce above 250 K. https://rosatom.ru/en/

the ghost fleet james river

U.S. Added Less New Wind Power in 2021 Than the Previous Year — Here’s Why

the ghost fleet james river

Vestas V236-15.0 MW Wind Turbines Ready for Testing?

the ghost fleet james river

Vestas Sells Wind Project in Mississippi to AES Corporation

the ghost fleet james river

MingYang Signs MoU for UK Manufacturing

the ghost fleet james river

Adani Group to Develop 1,000 MW Wind Power Project in Sri Lanka's Mannar

the ghost fleet james river

France Awards Only 54 MW of Capacity in a 925 MW Onshore Wind Tender

IMAGES

  1. The James River Reserve Fleet; The Last of an Armada that Served the

    the ghost fleet james river

  2. Haunted Hampton Roads: James River ‘Ghost Fleet’

    the ghost fleet james river

  3. Powerboat Photos

    the ghost fleet james river

  4. Rotors Over the James River Ghost Fleet

    the ghost fleet james river

  5. Powerboat Photos

    the ghost fleet james river

  6. Powerboat Photos

    the ghost fleet james river

VIDEO

  1. The Ghost Fleet of Chuuk Lagoon

  2. The Ghost Fleet of Mallows Bay #shorts

  3. Ghost Fleet #shorts

  4. Ghost Fleet: Part 12

  5. Fleet Foxes

  6. Drops In The River

COMMENTS

  1. James River, Reserve Fleet

    The James River Reserve Fleet (JRRF) is located on the James River in the U.S. state of Virginia at ( 37.120393°N 76.646469°W) near Fort Eustis. James River Reserve Fleet, a "ghost fleet", is part of the National Defense Reserve Fleet. The Reserve Fleet ships in storage, called "mothballed", that can be ready for use if needed.

  2. A Haunting in Hampton Roads: The Ghost Fleet on the James River

    The "Ghost Fleet", although perhaps a fitting name, is a colloquial name for what is officially the James River Reserve Fleet (JRRF), the oldest of the eight original National Defense Reserve Fleet (NDRF) sites, and one of only three that are still in operation.

  3. James River Reserve Fleet

    The James River Reserve Fleet (JRRF) is an anchorage of the National Defense Reserve Fleet (NDRF) located on the James River at Fort Eustis, Virginia. It is the oldest of the original eight NDRF fleet sites and is currently one of three that is still in operation.

  4. Haunted Hampton Roads: James River 'Ghost Fleet'

    Officially known as the James River Reserve Fleet, people sometimes refer to is as the 'Ghost Fleet' as the ships numbers continue to dwindle. Click here to explore the rest of our...

  5. National Defense Reserve Fleet

    Inactive U.S. Navy auxiliary ships in the James River near Fort Eustis in Newport News, Virginia Vessels with military utility or logistic value are held in retention status and are in a preservation program that is designed to keep them in the same condition as when they enter the fleet.

  6. James River Ghost Fleet

    Aerial footage of the ghost fleet in the James River, Virginia.

  7. Ghost Fleet haunts the James River

    By Pilot Online PUBLISHED: October 31, 2010 at 12:00 a.m. | UPDATED: August 9, 2019 at 4:32 a.m. ON THE JAMES RIVER Armed with a pot of chili, some cameras and a notebook, we set out in a...

  8. Ghost Fleet is shrinking, but not going away

    Ghost Fleet is shrinking, but not going away Show Caption of By Tamara Dietrich PUBLISHED: July 12, 2015 at 3:00 a.m. | UPDATED: August 16, 2019 at 2:45 p.m. The young Marine in the black...

  9. James River, Reserve Fleet

    The James River Reserve Fleet (JRRF) is located on the James River in the U.S. state of Virginia at ( 37.120393°N 76.646469°W) near Fort Eustis. James River Reserve Fleet, a "ghost fleet", is part of the National Defense Reserve Fleet. The Reserve Fleet ships in storage, called "mothballed", that can be ready for use if needed.

  10. Ghost Fleet

    The James River Reserve Fleet is an anchorage of the National Defense Reserve Fleet located on the James River at Fort Eustis, Virginia. It is the oldest o...

  11. James River in Virginia

    The plan was to paddle out to the middle of the James River, drift downriver with the tide past the ghost fleet, swing past a few miles of the wild shoreline of the Ft. Eustis military reservation, then return near slack tide and beachcomb where it was legal to do so.

  12. A river of knowledge: 14 cool things to know about the James River

    Ships are anchored in the James River as part of the Ghost Fleet near Newport News Monday, July 8, 2013. ALEXA WELCH EDLUND ... Formally called the James River Reserve Fleet, the ghosts are part ...

  13. American Ship Breaking

    The James River Ghost Fleet, off the shore at Fort Eustis, Virginia, is providing the majority of the ship breaking work in the nation right now. This ghost fleet was once the largest in the nation, with more than 800 ships in storage after WWII, stored here because it was up the river from the East Coast hub of the Navy, and the water was ...

  14. Future of the James River "Ghost Fleet"

    Future of the James River "Ghost Fleet" - U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Sci... Home Hearings Future of the James River "Ghost Fleet" July 7, 2003 11:00 AM Surface Transportation and Merchant Marine Subcommittee field hearing scheduled for Monday, July 7, at 11:00 a.m. at the Fort Eustis Maritime Museum in Newport News, VA.

  15. Reserve Fleet'S Weary Ships Wait for One More Call

    The empty flotilla eerily lives up to its nickname: the Ghost Fleet. But that name makes the officials that oversee the 99-ship fleet cringe. They don't like it. It's an active fleet, they say. This is one of three sites around the country where the federal government stores military and cargo ships that are no longer in active service, but may

  16. The Ghost Fleet on the James River as viewed from Fort Huger. IOW Co

    The Ghost Fleet on the James River as viewed from Fort Huger. IOW Co. Virginia As an ole' salty dog spending a lot of time refueling at sea this sight always...

  17. Fighting fires on the Ghost Fleet

    The National Defense Reserve Fleet in the James River off JBLE-Eustis, known as the "ghost fleet," served as the training site for the symposium. The ships are currently inactive and offered a variety of vessels to train on.

  18. James River

    Congresswoman Jo Ann Davis was successful in securing $20 million dollars in funding for removal of a portion of the James River Fleet, otherwise known as the Ghost Fleet, in the Department of ...

  19. Machine-Building Plant (Elemash)

    In 1954, Elemash began to produce fuel assemblies, including for the first nuclear power plant in the world, located in Obninsk. In 1959, the facility produced the fuel for the Soviet Union's first icebreaker. Its fuel assembly production became serial in 1965 and automated in 1982. 1. Today, Elemash is one of the largest TVEL nuclear fuel ...

  20. Ghost Fleet Cruise

    This is a video of a trip around the Ghost Fleet (also called the Reserve Fleet) in the lower James River in Virginia. This was filmed in the summer of 2007...

  21. P

    P - Jewish Encyclopedia of Russia - Belarus SIG - JewishGen.org. translated by Josif and Vitaly Charny. The following list is a translation of names and minimal personal data for 8,500 people included in Jewish Encyclopedia of Russia (Rossiyskaya Evreiskaya Entsiclopediya); first edition; 1995, Moscow. Famous people who are listed in the book ...

  22. Rosatom starts production of rare-earth magnets for wind power generation

    TVEL Fuel Company of Rosatom has started gradual localization of rare-earth magnets manufacturing for wind power plants generators. The first sets of magnets have been manufactured and shipped to the customer. In total, the contract between Elemash Magnit LLC (an enterprise of TVEL Fuel Company of Rosatom in Elektrostal, Moscow region) and Red ...

  23. Rosatom Starts Production of Rare-Earth Magnets for Wind Power

    06 Nov 2020 by Rosatom. TVEL Fuel Company of Rosatom has started gradual localization of rare-earth magnets manufacturing for wind power plants generators. The first sets of magnets have been manufactured and shipped to the customer. In total, the contract between Elemash Magnit LLC (an enterprise of TVEL Fuel Company of Rosatom in Elektrostal ...