The Phantom of The Opera (1983)

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Budapest at the beginning of the 20th century: In the Budapest Opera House rehearsals for a staging of Gounod's  Faust take place  under the renowned conductor Sandor Korvin. The role of the  Margarete occupied Sandor with his young, still inexperienced wife, the soprano Elena, during a break the owner of the opera, Baron Hunyadi offers Elena the chance to be a star by sleeping with him, Elena as a happily married woman rejects. Hunyadi now vows to make her début in a fiasco.

The audience whistles mercilessly, and the acknowledged opera critic Kraus sets, inspired by a generous tip of the baron, that same evening a negative review in the newspaper. In desperation, Elena takes her own life, she plunges into the Danube. Sandor heartbroken begins a vicious vendetta to find the one responsible for the death of his wife.

He seeks out the critic Kraus to confront him, he reveals that the Baron caused the scene, but the situation escalates, a fight ensues where Kraus is shot and a Bottle of Sulphuric Acid spills over Sandor's face. He is saved by Lajos the opera's Rat-catcher who steals plans and items from the Opera including a mask for Sandor. Disfigured beyond recognition, he retires to the abandoned vaults under the opera to wait for the right moment for his revenge.

Four years later: under the direction of the young director Michael Hartnell a new production of "Faust" with the arrogant diva Brigida Bianchi is to be performed. After a quarrel with Madame Bianchi he takes the young Maria Gianelli as a understudy. Even Sandor, who witness to her audition, has discovered the young woman and believes her as his deceased wife Elena. He makes contact with her and offers her to develop her voice to perfection. To do this, he invites her to his old house, asks her not to tell anyone about them and pranks Brigida so that she leaves for Maria to début.

While a romance develops between Maria and Michael, the Phantom reacts with raging jealousy and threatens him with death. Michael decides to drop Maria despite her improved voice and reinstalls Brigida. During the annual masked ball Maria and the Phantom met and he warns her that she is his and so Maria leaves with the Baron Hunyadi who offered her a ride home earlier, however the Lajos abducts Maria and Hunyadi.

When confronted Hunyadi promises to make amends, by making Maria the star Elena should been. The Phantom pretends to let the Baron go but has him hacked to death by his trained raven and his corpse is found in his Opera House during a rehearsal. The Phantom tells Maria he wants to keep her with him, in the secret chambers under the opera, in order to spare her the cruel fate of his wife. In the course of Maria trying to get The Phantom to let her go, she tears off his mask and reveals his gruesome, mutilated face. He becomes furious and tells her that she has lost the chance to get free forever.

Michael does not believe in the theory of the police inspector that the baron's killer probably also killed Maria as a potential witness, and begins to investigate. When he hears of some stage workers the tragedy of Sandor Korvin and his wife, who looks so much like Maria, he suspects that Korvin may still be alive and could hide somewhere in or under the opera. In an archive he gets the plans of the substructure of the opera and finds the way to the hiding place of the Phantom through the sewers and after battling Lajos he frees Maria.

Knowing that Sandor will try and capture Maria again Michael and the Inspector decide to trap the Phantom when Faust premières. That night Korvin who has finally gone mad after the repeated loss of "his wife", decides to commit his last act of revenge on the cruel world. He travels to the Chandelier's Dome and begins to saw the chain, as underneath it is the Inspector. Maria while in an Box despite the fact Michael, the Inspector and police are everywhere, is scared the Phantom is close as the Auditorium's décor has masks and statures reminding her of him.

Maria leaves the Box and the Inspector seeing this finds her in the lobby, he convinces her to use his seat instead and she does. The Phantom notices Maria and attempts to climb back up the dome but the chain is already sawn through and he watches in fear as it finally breaks. Maria notices the falling chandelier in time as does everyone else, and she manages to escape together with the audience. The Phantom himself dies, crushed under the heavy chandelier, without his mask.

  • Maximilian Schell  - Sándor Korvin/The Phantom of the Opera - Formally was the orchestra conductor before he became the Phantom.
  • Jane Seymour  also plays Elena Korvin - Sándor Korvin's wife who commits suicide.
  • Michael York  - Michael Hartnell - English opera director and Maria's love interest.
  • Jeremy Kemp  - Baron Hunyadi - Owner of The Opera House, who takes pleasure in having affairs with the leading ladies.
  • Diana Quick  - Madame Brigida Bianchi - Spoilt diva who cares only for herself.
  • Paul Brooke  - Inspector - Police inspector who investigates Korvin.
  • Gellért Raksányi  - Lajos - The Rat catcher who works alongside The Phantom.

Differences from the Book/Trivia. [ ]

  • The Film is set in 1900's Budapest, when the original was set in Paris in the 1890's, there is electric light, gramophones and cars as important features.
  • There is no lake underneath the Opera House.
  • Michael Hartnell replaces Raoul, Baron Hunyadi replaces the Mangers and The Inspector is clearly The Persian in this version's rewrite.
  • Elena, the critics and the cleaning ladies are all original characters.
  • While the script is different to the original book, when the unmasking scene happens The Phantom's first line is directly taken from the Leroux novel "Aright you wanted to see it, see it"
  • Korvin's look as the Phantom is familiar to the look of Claude Rains in the 1943 version.
  • The disfigurement by Acid is taken from Song at Midnight and then reused in both the 1943 version and the 1962 version.
  • Baron Hunyadi could be an rewrite of the villain of the 1962 version Lord Ambrose D'Arcy.
  • The chandelier crash at the end was used to end the 1962 version.
  • The use of an Turkish Bath in one scene and the character of the Rat-catcher would be reused in the 1989 and 1998 version.
  • 1 Christine de Changey (Love Never Dies)
  • 2 Christine Daeé (Emmy Rossum)
  • 3 Meg Giry (Love Never Dies)

The Phantom of the Opera (1983)

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The Phantom of the Opera (1983) is a film adaptation of The Phantom of the Opera (1910) , and was directed by Robert Markowitz.

In Budapest a young operatic soprano Elena Korvin is struggling to rehearse the part of Marguerite in the opera Gounod 's Faust despite the assistance from her loving husband Sándor Korvin, the orchestra's conductor. The Opera House's owner Baron Hunyadi attempts to win Elena's heart to draw her away from her husband but Elena refuses. She leaves with a fearful threat from Hunyadi that her career will end. Elena loses hope of succeeding in the role believing she is not good enough. But Korvin insists that she is and proves so by convincing her to be calm and confident. In revenge for Elena refusal the baron bribes a man [Who had already made a deal with Korvin to help encourage Elena during the show] to make the audience boo and despise Elena during her debut. He also bribes the critic to write a bad review about her. Completely heartbroken Elena jumps into the river, drowning herself. A vengeful Korvin murders the man who drove the audience against his wife, then he goes to confront the critic. During a struggle the office catches fire. Korvin murders the critic but a bottle of sulphuric acid falls over on a shelf and splashes on to Korvin's face badly burning him. He is saved from the fire by the rat catcher Lajos who hides him in the cellars beneath the Opera house. Lajos steals a mask from the costume department to hide Korvin's deformity caused by the acid. From then on Sándor Korvin becomes the "Opera Ghost" AKA The Phantom of the Opera .

Four years later, Faust is being performed again. The selfish leading soprano Madame Brigida Bianchi refuses to follow the direction from the show's English director Michael Hartnell. The spoiled diva accuses everyone in the show being the reason for her problems and walks away. Hartnall offers Baron Hunyadi to take over the show. But Hunyadi refuses due to his "personal relationship" with Madame Bianchi. So Hartnall holds an understudy audition for the role of Marguerite. A young Italian/American soprano Maria Gianelli, performs a perfect audition which amazes everyone and she is granted the role. The Phantom who also witnessed the audition is interested in Maria, not just because of her voice, but because she bears a remarkable resemblance to Elena. He vows to help her and that her triumph will be his revenge.

83 1

Hartnall and Maria begin to develop romantic feelings for each other during the first few days of rehearsals. The Phantom slips an insulting note to Madame Bianchi. The diva accuses Maria believing she sent the note. Despite Maria denial, Madame Bianchi declares that she never wants to see Maria in the theatre again. At home Maria sits sadly. When her lights unexpectedly turn off she is approached by The Phantom. At first she is afraid of his masked face but he assures her the mask is to protect her. He says he wants to help make her a great singer. Offers her the key to a place to meet him and where she can learn. Maria accepts his offer taking the key.

The next day Maria finds the key is to a huge and beautiful house. In one room she finds a wardrobe of dresses and a framed photo of Elena on a vanity. Maria is confused by the resemblance between her and the blonde woman. When The Phantom arrives he tells Maria that he'd like her to wear the dresses while they are rehearsing, that she will tell no one of him and devote her days to the lessons. As the days go by Maria's voice improves strongly with her lessons. Due to constant pranks from The Phantom, Madame Bianchi leaves which makes Maria the new leading lady. Hartnall and Maria fall in love each other. But Hartnall is choked at the Turkish spa by The Phantom, threatening Hartnall to stay away from Maria. Hartnall decides to postpone Maria's debut, believing she is not ready. Maria sends a note to The Phantom to meet her at the Masked Ball.

At the masked ball, Hunyadi attempts to win Maria’s affections but just like Elena, Maria turns down The Baron’s advances. She is then met by The Phantom who wears a mask resembling his original face and the two of them dance. The Phantom tells her not to see Hartnall again and they will be together forever. She flees from the ball but is kidnapped along with Hunyadi by Lajos and taken to The Phantom’s lair. Maria is knocked out when she attempts to escape again. Hunyadi realizes The Phantom’s true identity is Sándor Korvin, he promises that if he is freed he will make Maria the star Elena should have been. Korvin frees the baron but when Hunyadi enters his car he is pecked to death by a crow. His body is then discovered hanging from a backdrop above the stage.

When Maria awakens the Phantom says that she will remain underground with him so she won’t suffer as his wife did. Maria says that if he lets her go she would return. But The Phantom assures her that in his heart he is good and he wants her to love him. While caressing him she rips away his mask revealing his burned deformed face. Angered Korvin declares that Maria will never leave the underground. He reveals a dead girl’s body dressed in Maria’s ball dress, he declares that when her body is discovered the police will believe the corpse is Maria’s. Korvin leaves to dump the body while Lajos watches over Maria. Hartnall who has been tracking Korvin discovers the lair by hearing Maria’s singing. Lajos gets knocked out and Hartnall helps Maria escape. Korvin murders Lajos for failing to guard Maria and disappears from the underground. The police inspector and Hartnall plan to capture Korvin in the theatre during a performance with Maria as bait sitting in the audience.

On the night, Korvin plans to drop the chandelier on the inspector who is sat directly beneath it. Maria swaps seats with the inspector because she feels unsafe in the opera box she was originally seated. Korvin who is on the chandelier sawing through its chain spots Maria sitting down beneath the chandelier. Fearfully he tries to get back up to prevent the chandelier falling on her, but the chain breaks and both fall down. Maria sees it falling and gets away just in time with the other audience members. Korvin dies from the fall and lies with his mask fallen from his deformed face.

  • Maximilian Schell - Sándor Korvin/The Phantom of the Opera - Formally was the orchestra conductor before he became the Phantom.
  • Jane Seymour also plays Elena Korvin - Sándor Korvin's wife who commits suicide.
  • Michael York - Michael Hartnell - English opera director and Maria's love interest.
  • Jeremy Kemp - Baron Hunyadi - Owner of The Opera House, who takes pleasure in having affairs with the leading ladies.
  • Diana Quick - Madame Brigida Bianchi - Spoiled diva who cares only for herself.
  • Paul Brooke - Inspector - Police inspector who investigates Korvin.
  • Gellért Raksányi - Lajos - The rat catcher who works alongside The Phantom.
  • 1 The Phantom
  • 2 The Phantom of the Opera (2004)
  • 3 Raoul de Chagny

Phantom of the Opera

Film details, brief synopsis, cast & crew, robert markowitz, sandor halmagyi, jane seymour, laszlo nemeth, gellert raksanyi, technical specs.

This fourth filming of the horror classic (fifth, if one counts the rock spoof, "Phantom of the Paradise") gives Maximilian Schell the role of the disfigured musician whose obsession is diabolical revenge for the suicide of his young opera singer wife. Jane Seymour is not only his wife but also an up-and-coming singer whose stardom he orchestrates because of her resemblance to his true love. Michael York is the opera producer who has taken a romantic interest in the lookalike (comparable to the Nelson Eddy role in the 1943 version). Lon Chaney had played The Phantom in the 1925 movie, Claude Rains in 1943, and Herbert Lom in 1962. Gaston Leroux was not credited as the author of this timeless novel.

phantom of the opera 1983 wiki

Maximilian Schell

Paul brooks, philip stone, diana quick, jeremy kemp, andras miko, denes ujlaky, ferenc begalyi, nora nemeth.

phantom of the opera 1983 wiki

Michael York

Lajos mezey, agnes david, sandor deki lakatos, christine berardo, tivadar bertalan, ralph burns, zoltan elek, gabor erdelyi, caroline ferriol, robert halmi, robert halmi jr., gaston leroux, larry pizer, stan winston, sherman yellen, miscellaneous notes.

Aired in United States January 29, 1983

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The Phantom of the Opera (1983 TV Movie)

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phantom of the opera 1983 wiki

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Film / The Phantom of the Opera (1983)

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Sándor Korvin ( Maximilian Schell ), the conductor at the Budapest Opera House, is training his wife Elena ( Jane Seymour (Actress) ) for the role of Marguerite in Faust . Her debut is met with mockery and a scathing review orchestrated by the vindictive Baron Hunyadi (Jeremy Kemp), whose advances she spurned. Elena is Driven to Suicide , and the grieving Sándor confronts the critic who wrote the review. He kills the man, but a fire is started in which Sándor's face is horribly disfigured. He retreats to the sewers beneath the opera house, where he becomes the masked Phantom of the Opera. Years later, a new production of Faust is being put on at the opera house. A young chorus girl named Maria Gianelli (also played by Seymour) catches the eye of Sándor, for she is the spitting image of his dead wife. He begins to tutor her, but is infuriated to learn that she is falling in love with the director of the opera, a man named Michael Hartnell ( Michael York )

This film has examples of:

  • Adaptational Backstory Change : Once again. Here the Phantom is a conductor who was disfigured instead of a genius born deformed.
  • Adaptational Location Change : This adaptation moves the story from France to Hungary .
  • Adaptational Nationality : The characters are Hungarian rather than French (or Swedish in Christine's case)
  • Adaptation Name Change : In this version, the Phantom's name is Sándor instead of Erik, the Christine character is called Maria, and the Raoul character is Michael. The Carlotta stand-in is known as Brigida.
  • Agent Scully : Michael mocks the idea of a opera ghost, claiming that every opera house has one to explain every little misfortune that occurs. He drops this attitude after he’s attacked and Maria is abducted.
  • Anonymous Benefactor : Sándor is this to Maria, giving her gowns and singing lessons while she is unaware of who he is.
  • Battle Amongst the Flames : In the beginning, when Sándor attacks the critic in his office, he causes a fire after throwing a burning rod onto the carpet.
  • Elena is genuinely talented, but held back by her stage fright and general fear that she will never be good enough. This proves to be her undoing after her debut is sabotaged.
  • Brigida Bianchi is the most experienced singer, but she's also The Prima Donna . So much so that it affects her acting skills and nearly costs her the job.
  • Maria is the most talented of the three, but comes from a very poor background. This makes her eager to accept opportunites that will further her career, and leaves her vulnerable to the machinations of both the Phantom and Baron Hunyadi
  • Because You Were Nice to Me : This is implied to be the reason why Lajos, the rat catcher, assists the Phantom. Sándor was the head conductor at the opera house before his wife's death, and treated everyone there with a good deal of respect. Lajos is also shown to be appreciative of Elena's singing. This, coupled with the fact that no one really likes Baron Hunyadi, and it becomes easy to see why he'd help the Phantom with his revenge.
  • Baron Hunyadi shares traits with the stage managers, the Count Philipe du Chagny, and Joseph Buquet. He is the patron/owner of the opera house, has a business partnership with Michael, and meets his death at the Phantom's hands.
  • Lajos shares characteristics with both the Persian and the rat-catcher of the novel.
  • A flock of crows attacks Baron Hunyadi, resulting in his death .
  • Elena also sees one flapping it's wings right before her suicide.
  • Crusading Widow : Sándor, who seeks to avenge his wife's death, punishing all those responsible for her downfall.
  • Dramatic Unmask : Maria pulls Sándor's mask off when he has his guard down, and he reacts with rage, telling her that now that she has seen his face she can never leave him.
  • Driven to Suicide : After her disastrous debut as Marguerite, Elena throws herself in the river.
  • Exact Eavesdropping : Michael just happens to overhear two washerwomen discussing what happened to the last poor woman who starred in Faust. Unlike most examples of this trope, Michael has no reason to hide from them. So he approaches them and questions them further. They happily gossip with him and reveal several key facts that point to the Phantom's true identity, and his current motives.
  • Eye Scream : Crows peck out the eyes of Baron Hunyadi .
  • Facial Horror : Sándor's face is hideously disfigured by both fire and acid from a jar that topples over during his fight with the critic.
  • Falling Chandelier of Doom : In the finale, the Phantom cuts the chain on the chandelier and it falls.
  • Faux Affably Evil : Oscar Krause, the critic hired by Hunyadi. When Sándor confronts him he appears horrified at learning of Elena’s suicide… only to pull a gun on Sándor when he tries to force him to write a confession. He even taunts Sándor, referring to his wife as a third rate Prima Donna.
  • Green-Eyed Monster : Sándor is angered when he learns of Michael and Maria's romantic relationship. He threatens Michael with death if he doesn't stay away from Maria.
  • Maria very nearly escapes the Phantom’s lair on her own merit, fleeing through the sewers and ascending a staircase… Until she rounds a corner and is subdued by Sándor.
  • When captured, Hunyadi attempts to bargain for his life by claiming that he will redeem Elena’s name in the public eye. The Phantom initially appears to agree… before trapping him in a carriage and setting the crows upon him.
  • Identical Stranger : Maria, who looks exactly like Sándor's dead wife Elena (due to being played by the same actress), though there is apparently no familial connection between them.
  • I Have You Now, My Pretty : Baron Hunyadi attempts this on Maria at the masked ball... only to be captured and taken to the Phantom alongside her. It also qualifies as a Villainous Rescue , as Maria really isn't much better off with the Phantom.
  • The Lost Lenore : Elena Korvin. She dies early on, and it's Sándor's desire to avenge her that drives the plot. He also becomes obsessed with another woman because she looks just like Elena.
  • Love Makes You Evil : Sándor's love for his wife is what drives him to wreak vengeance on those who destroyed her.
  • Masking the Deformity : Inevitable, given the source material. Sándor is forced to cover face after the fire, and his former life ends as he takes up the mantle of the Phantom. While he doesn't bear this deformity from birth like the original, he still has a massive Freak Out when Maria unmasks him late into the film.
  • Meaningful Echo : In an early scene, Sándor tells Elena "Your hand is trembling. All great singers are nervous in their first role. That's a wonderful sign." Later he says the same thing to Maria, who he sees as Elena's Replacement Goldfish .
  • First, there's the one seen in the image above. It's a prop created by Sándor, that Lajos steals from the theater and gives back to the Phantom.
  • Later, Sándor switches to a wax mask that bears a much closer resemblance to his original face. Maria burns this one out of spite near the film's climax.
  • The Mourning After : Sándor never gets over the loss of Elena and devotes his life to avenging her death.
  • Mummies at the Dinner Table : It's revealed that Sándor has kept his wife's body with him in his underground lair for years.
  • Murder the Hypotenuse : Sándor threatens to do this to any man who tries to date Maria. Sándor: It's over with Hartnell. Maria: Yes. Sándor: You'll never see him again? Maria: Of course not. Sándor: If you ever see him, Maria, he will die. If you see any other man, he will die.
  • Not a Mask : When Maria removes the Phantom's mask, he asks her sarcastically if she thinks his disfigured face is another mask. He grabs her hands and digs her nails into his face, daring her to try to take it off. This scene was taken directly from the original book.
  • Oh, Crap! : Baron Hunyadi is stunned to find out that not only does Sándor still lives on, he is the very Phantom that’s been committing the recent thefts and misfortunes around the opera house.
  • Replacement Goldfish : Sándor sees Maria as this due to her striking resemblance to Elena, though she does not return his feelings.
  • Roaring Rampageof Revenge : Sándor manages this against two of the three men who caused Elena’s death. However, when the results leave him permanently disfigured, he is forced to seek out a much more gradual revenge against Hunyadi.
  • Sanity Slippage : His wife's suicide and his disfigurement make Sándor lose his mind.
  • Shrinking Violet : Elena was this, in stark contrast to Maria’s Plucky Girl attitude.
  • Sleeping with the Boss : Elena refuses to do this with Baron Hunyadi, and in response he ensures that her performance in Faust is mercilessly mocked and ridiculed.
  • Thoroughly Mistaken Identity : Sándor begins to believe Maria is Elena and refers to her as such. She angrily responds by saying she's not who he thinks she is, but he asks her if she is so sure of that. He plans to throw his wife's corpse (preserved by him for years) into the river, so when it is found it will be assumed it is Maria's. In Sándor's warped mind, Maria's old self will have then "died" and thus thereafter she will truly "be" Elena.
  • Thousand-Yard Stare : Sándor understandably wears one after he sees Elena’s body in the morgue.
  • You Have Failed Me : After finding out that his assistant failed to stop Maria from escaping, Sándor kills him.
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phantom of the opera 1983 wiki

The Phantom of the Opera: All you need to know about the legendary musical

He's back, The Phantom of the Opera!

October 2021 marks a whopping 35 years since The Phantom of the Opera opened on the West End. The Andrew Lloyd Webber musical has become a staple both in the West End and Broadway with the Phantom's mask one of the most well-known icons in theatre.

Here we'll dive into everything you need to know about the hit musical including the show's history, who's in the cast and how to get tickets.

What is The Phantom of the Opera about?

The Phantom of the Opera is based on the 1910 French novel of the same name by Gaston Leroux. The musical tells the story of Christine Daaé, a soprano at the Paris Opéra House. Beneath the opera house lives a mysterious, masked musical genius who becomes obsessed with Christine.

Who's in the cast?

The West End production of The Phantom of the Opera stars Killian Donnelly (Les Misérables, Kinky Boots) in the titular role, Lucy St Louis (Motown the Musical, The Book of Mormon) plays Christine Daaé and Rhys Whitfield (Summer and Smoke, Jesus Christ Superstar) as Raoul, Vicomte de Chagny.

The cast also includes Saori Oda as ‘Carlotta Giudicelli’, Matt Harrop as ‘Monsieur Firmin’, Adam Linstead as ‘Monsieur André’, Greg Castiglioni as ‘Ubaldo Piangi’, Francesca Ellis as ‘Madame Giry’ and Ellie Young as Meg Giry. At certain performances the role of ‘Christine Daaé’ will be played by Holly-Anne Hull.

They are joined by Leeroy Boone, Corina Clark, Edward Court, Lily De-La-Haye, Hywel Dowsell, Jemal Felix, Erin Flaherty, James Gant, Eilish Harmon-Beglan, Yukina Hasebe, Olivia Holland-Rose, Grace Hume, James Hume, Donald Craig Manuel, Jonathan Milton, Janet Mooney, Tim Morgan, Beatrice Penny-Toure, Michael Robert-Lowe, Nikki Skinner, Tim Southgate, Ashley Stillburn, Manon Taris, Anouk Van Laake, Skye Weiss, Simon Whitaker and Karen Wilkinson.

Who wrote Phantom?

The music for The Phantom of the Opera was written by Andrew Lloyd Webber and is probably one of his most famous musicals (which is quite impressive considering how famous all the others are).

The lyrics were written by Charles Hart who also collaborated with Andrew Lloyd Webber and Don Black for Aspects of Love. Charles also penned the lyrics for Bend It Like Beckham. The book and additional lyrics were written by Richard Stillgoe.

Charles Hart on Scala Radio

You can hear Charles on Scala Radio when he joins Jack Pepper from 6pm on Saturday (9th October).

Who directed Phantom?

Harold Prince, (often referred to as Hal Prince) was the director for The Phantom of the Opera. Harold has worked on several famous productions, another Lloyd Webber show he worked on was Evita. He directed many of Stephen Sondheim's musicals including Follies, A Little Night Music and Sweeney Todd.

Harold was also a co-producer on the original 1954 production of The Pajama Game and the 1957 production of West Side Story.

Who choreographed Phantom?

The Phantom of the Opera was originally choreographed by legendary choreographer Gillian Lynne. Gillian's also worked on other Lloyd Webber musicals including Cats which is renowned for its brilliant choreography.

In 2018 the New London Theatre, the original home of Cats was renamed after her making it the first West End Theatre to be named after a non-royal woman. The theatre is now home to Andrew Lloyd Webber's Cinderella.

Adapted staging and choreography for Phantom is by Chrissie Catwright.

Where is The Phantom of the Opera in London?

The London home of The Phantom of the Opera is Her Majesty's Theatre which is located on the Haymarket just a short walk from Piccadilly Circus. Her Majesty's Theatre has been the place to see Phantom in the West End since the show opened in 1986.

Has Phantom won any awards?

Phantom had three nominations at the 1986 Laurence Olivier Awards where it won Best New Musical and Michael Crawford won Best Actor in a Musical for the role of the Phantom. The show also won two more Olivier Awards later on, Most Popular Show in 2002 and the Magic Radio Audience Award in 2016.

The Broadway production received 10 Tony nominations at the 1988 Tony Awards where they won seven including Best Musical, Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Musical (Michael Crawford once again), Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Musical (Judy Kaye) and Best Direction of a Musical (Harold Prince).

Is there a film version?

The original novel has had multiple film versions but the Andrew Lloyd Webber version got its big screen adaptation in 2004. The film was directed by Joel Schumacher and had Gerard Butler in the titular role and Emmy Rossum as Christine.

Is Phantom closing?

Not at all! Fears for the future of the West End production came when all theatres were forced to close their doors in March 2020 because of the Coronavirus pandemic. In the summer of that year producer Cameron Mackintosh said that Phantom would be closed permanently.

However, that did not end up being the case, the time was used to get some much needed renovation work done on the theatre and set and the Phantom returned to Her Majesty's Theatre in July 2021!

When did The Phantom of the Opera open in London?

The Phantom of the Opera began previews on 27th September 1986 and had its official opening night on 9th October 1986 meaning the show has been running for 35 years!

Is Phantom the longest running musical?

It is not, the West End production is currently in second place for the West End's (and the world's) longest running musical. The top spot is held by Les Misérables which has been running almost exactly a year longer having opened at the Barbican on 9th October 1985.

The musical does however hold the title for Broadway's longest running musical with the production in New York running since January 1988.

WATCH: Classic trailer for The Phantom of the opera

How to get tickets to the phantom of the opera in london.

Tickets for The Phantom of the Opera can be bought online from the LW Theatres website.

For Access bookings you can contact [email protected] and include the name of the show in the subject. LW Theatres also offer an Access scheme designed to make it easier to purchase Access and companion tickets. Full information for the LW Theatres Access Scheme can be found on their website .

Love musicals?

If you enjoy musicals, have you tried out Scala Premium station 'Time to Sing? From choral, opera, and musicals, our Time to Sing station celebrates the very best vocal music. Find out more here.

Scroll through our favourite Andrew Lloyd Webber musicals:

Joseph and the amazing technicolor dreamcoat.

Andrew's first real success came with his theatre adaptation of Joseph's story and his "coat of many colours". The show began life as a 15-minute school performance in London in 1968, and by 1974 it had developed into its current iteration. The show has starred many famous faces through the years including David Cassidy, Jason Donovan, Donny Osmond, Phillip Schofield, Stephen Gately and Lee Mead all playing the titular role. A 1999 film adaptation saw Donny reprise his role of Joseph. The musical was revived in 2019 with a new production at the London Palladium with Jac Yarrow in the lead role. The production made a return in 2021 following the pandemic and is currently on tour.

Jesus Christ Superstar

Another of Andrew's musical to borrow its plot from the bible, Jesus Christ Superstar follows the last week of Jesus' life before he was crucified. The show started out as a rock opera album, before it was made into a fully-fledged musical. The show opened on Broadway in October 1971, with rock god Alice Cooper even playing King Herod in 1996 in London.

Releasing Jeeves after Jesus Christ Superstar, Andrew chose a biographical topic for his next musical - focusing on the life of Eva Perón, the second wife of Argentine President Juan Perón. The show's most famous song is 'Don't Cry For Me Argentina', and was made into a film in 1996 with Madonna in the lead role (pictured) starring alongside Antonio Banderas and Jonathan Pryce.

Taking inspiration from T. S. Eliot's poetry book Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats, the show's plot may be slightly tenuous but the production itself is always marvellous. Its most famous song is 'Memory', sang by the character of Grizabella who was originated by theatre legend Elaine Paige, reprising her role for the 1998 film. Other famous faces to have played the role are Pussycat Dolls' Nicole Scherzinger, Beverley Knight, Leona Lewis and Jennifer Hudson in the 2019 film adaptation. Fun fact: Judi Dench was all set to originate the role of Grizabella, but tore her Achilles tendon just before the show began. She later played Old Deuteronomy in the 2019 film.

Starlight Express

If cats weren't hard enough to emulate on stage for three hours, ALW then decided to write a musical purely about trains! The actors traditionally perform the show on roller skates, and the titular song is possibly the most well-known. Premiering in 1984, the original West End production ran for eight years before a revised version launched in 1992 and ran for 10 years.

The Phantom of the Opera

The Phantom of the Opera is the longest running Broadway musical and the second longest-running West End musical - and no surprise, as it's one of the most beloved shows of all time. Based on the novel of the same name by Gaston Leroux, the story follows the titular Phantom, a disfigured music genius who lives in a labyrinth underneath the Paris Opéra House who becomes obsessed with singer Christine.

Sunset Boulevard

Based on the 1950 film of the same name, Sunset Boulevard follows the story of a former Hollywood star who clings to her old life - ending in complete tragedy. The most well-known song is 'As If We Never Said Goodbye', and the show initially ran from 1993 until 1997.

Whistle Down the Wind

Another musical based on a film, Whistle Down the Wind premiered in 1996 and the story followed that of the 1961 movie. It originally opened in the US, before a reworked run in the West End in 1998. One of the most famous songs from the show is 'No Matter What', which was recorded at the time by Boyzone for the concept album and went onto become one of their biggest hits.

Love Never Dies

A sort-of sequel to Phantom, Love Never Dies premiered in 2010 and followed the characters of the Phantom, Christine, her husband Raoul and their son Gustave 10 years after the events of the original. It opened on the West End with Sierra Boggess and Ramin Karimloo reprising their roles from as Christine and the Phantom at the Royal Albert Hall 25th Anniversary Cast in 2011.

School of Rock

Yet another musical based on a film, School of Rock was something a bit different for Andrew, following the same story as the 2003 Jack Black movie: a rock singer who has fallen on hard times poses as a music teacher. It premiered in the US in 2015 before transferring to the West End in 2016. Its final performance was in March 2020, to make way for Andrew's upcoming musical, Cinderella.

Which brings us to... Cinderella ! Andrew's most recent musical is a modern interpretation of the original story. The West End production starred Carrie Hope Fletcher in the titular role and Victoria Hamilton-Barritt as the Stepmother. The musical's opening was postponed multiple times by the COVID-19 Pandemic but eventually opened in 2021 to rave reviews. The West End production ended its run in June 2022 with the show now running across the pond on Broadway under the new name 'Bad Cinderella'.

WATCH: The Phantom of the Opera West End | Official Trailer

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phantom of the opera 1983 wiki

Discover the real history behind 'The Phantom of the Opera'

Learn about the myths and legends that inspired the classic musical.

Gillian Russo

The Phantom of the Opera is there, inside your... history book? He could be, or at least inside a book of legends. The story of a masked, disfigured Paris Opera House dweller who puts an ingenue under his musical spell sounds like the stuff of myths. But stories of a chandelier crash and a ghost at the opera house in Paris circulated long before The Phantom of the Opera , now set to close in February 2023, became the longest-running Broadway show and third-longest-running West End show in history.

Compoer   Andrew Lloyd Webber based the show on a 1910 novel of the same name by Gaston Leroux. And he based his novel on multiple spooky events in the Palais Garnier, the opera house where the  Phantom book and musical are set.

Some of the stories of people, places, and events that inspired  The Phantom of the Opera are true. Others are probably not, but they're fun legends that Leroux immortalized and Webber later made famous with his iconic score. While no one knows exactly how true these stories are, here's how they inspired Leroux to create the tale that haunts and thrills audiences over a century later, and how Webber made them his own.

Experience these tales now before  The Phantom of the Opera  closes on Broadway.

Get The Phantom of the Opera tickets now.

Is  The Phantom of the Opera  based on a true story?

Yes and no — the plot of  The Phantom of the Opera  is fictional, but parts are inspired by true stories and legends. While everything in the musical did not actually happen, many elements of the show (and the novel it's based on) are taken from real stories of what happened at a Paris opera house. For example, there was actually a devastating chandelier accident, and there are many rumors of a ghostly presence haunting the theatre.

Read more below to find out what true (and ghost) stories inspired the record-breaking show, and see them on stage before The Phantom of the Opera  closes. 

The chandelier crash in Phantom  was inspired by a true event. 

The Act 1 finale, during which a one-ton chandelier comes crashing down onto the stage, is one of the most iconic moments in The Phantom of the Opera musical. It's thrilling to watch live, and it was inspired by a real tragedy at the Palais Garnier. Contrary to popular belief, though, it wasn't actually the chandelier that fell. On May 20, 1896, a performance of the opera Helle was underway when a counterweight, one of multiple which held the chandelier up, broke loose and fell through the ceiling.

One person was killed, and several others were injured. Forensic investigators later said a nearby electrical wire probably overheated and melted the steel cable holding up the counterweight, causing its fall. In The Phantom of the Opera book and musical, the Phantom cuts the whole chandelier loose during the curtain call of the opera Il Muto , in order to exact revenge on Christine for falling in love with Raoul instead of him. Luckily, no one in the musical dies from the crash.

phantom 750-nytg

The Paris Opera House really has an underground lake.

Yes, the Palais Garnier actually has an underground lake! In the  Phantom musical and book, the lake is the centerpiece of the Phantom's lair. A feat of theatrical magic transforms the Broadway stage into the lake, on which the Phantom and Christine ride on a canoe amid the mist, as he sings the music of the night.

Legend goes that a faceless man (and some fish) once lived in the lake. Leroux heard the rumor and ran with it. In reality, the lake looks more like a sewer and had a much more practical purpose: keeping well and steam pump water away while the opera house foundation was being built. The only occupants of the "lake" as of late are a single white catfish (the opera house staff's unofficial pet) and French firefighters, who practice swimming in the dark there. We wonder if they've ever heard music coming from seemingly nowhere while doing so...

The Phantom is based on a real ghost story.

The many legends that inspired the Phantom are shrouded in as much mystery as the character himself. One story goes that in 1873, a stage fire destroyed the Paris Opera company's old venue, the Salle Le Peletier. (That part is true.) A ballerina died and her fiancé, a pianist, was disfigured. Legend has it that he retreated to the underground of the Palais Garnier, the company's new venue, and lived there until he died. Is he the same faceless man that supposedly lived in the lake? That's uncertain, but it's clear how these legends inspired the Phantom's appearance and living situation in Leroux's book.

Another rumor that inspired Leroux is the story of a ghost who haunts the Palais Garnier. Not only did the tale inspire him, but Leroux became obsessed with proving that the ghost was real. In the prologue to The Phantom of the Opera  novel, he talks about the mysterious disappearance of one Vicomte de Chagny, who disappeared to Canada for 15 years without a trace. When he finally returned to Paris, he immediately went to the Palais and asked for a free opera ticket.

Leroux goes on to claim that Chagny and his brother were fighting over Christine Daaé (a fictional character), insinuating that a "tragedy" happened between the two. Since the Vicomte is clearly the inspiration for Christine's childhood friend and lover, Vicomte Raoul de Chagny, in Leroux's novel, it appears he believed the brother is the ghost, who was killed in some sort of tussle and now haunts the shadowy corners of the Palais Garnier.

Though the ghost's presence is hearsay — or, according to some sources, the opera house ghost is actually a jilted old woman — Leroux firmly believed the ghost is real. He also claimed that a body was unearthed below the Palais Garnier, which belonged to the would-be ghost and proved his story. (The fact that the revolutionary French Commune government used the Palais basement to hold prisoners is a somewhat more likely explanation for the body.) After all that, it's almost ironic that the titular character of The Phantom of the Opera isn't an actual ghost, but he kept the name "The Phantom" for his otherworldly, ghostly presence.

The Phantom of the Opera

Andrew Lloyd Webber wrote Christine Daaé based on his real love story. 

Christine Daaé is a fully fictional character, but some researchers say she was inspired by Christina Nilsson, a Swedish soprano who enjoyed a 20-year career as an acclaimed international opera singer. Other accounts say that Christine was partly inspired by a ballerina named Nanine Dorival, though no one knows for sure. Dorival (along with an acquaintance of Leroux's named Madame la Baronne de Castelot-Barbezac) is also said to have inspired the character of Meg Giry, as Dorival and Giry's mothers are both boxkeepers.

What's certain is that Webber's real-life romance inspired how he'd adapt Christine's character for the musical 70 years later. When he was writing The Phantom of the Opera , Webber was married to Sarah Brightman, a classical soprano who he'd met and married after she starred in his musical Cats in the West End.

He wrote the role of Christine for Brightman, composing the character's songs to fit her vocal range. After she originated the role in the West End, Webber naturally wanted Brightman to do so on Broadway, too. The Actor's Equity union refused at first, saying he should cast an American actor and that international Broadway leads had to be major stars. But love conquered all — Webber insisted, and he came to a compromise with Equity that he'd cast an American lead in his next London production. Webber and Brightman eventually divorced, but her influence on the role remains forever.

The Phantom of the Opera love triangle comes from a legend. 

One of the inspirations for the main characters' love triangle is mentioned above, about how two brothers supposedly fought over a woman named Christine. There's another spooky story, though, that is said to have inspired Leroux. According to legend, a ballet dancer named Boismaison fell for the aforementioned  ballerina Nanine Dorival. However, a French sergeant, Monsieur Mauzurier, also loved her, and he took it upon himself to get Boismaison out of the picture.

Boismaison had willed his bones to the Paris Opera in the hopes that he'd stay near his lover even after he died. According to a now-debunked legend, they honored his wishes and held onto his bones, even using his skeleton as a prop in Le Freischütz , an opera by Carl Maria von Weber. Nevertheless, the fabled love triangle inspired that of Raoul, the Phantom, and Christine. With source material as bizarre as this, it's no wonder that The Phantom of the Opera 's love story became a Gothic horror for the ages.

Originally published on Sep 29, 2022 13:00

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The Phantom of the Opera

1983, Horror, 1h 40m

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The phantom of the opera   photos.

An acid-scarred conductor (Maximilian Schell) lives in the sewers of 1910 Budapest, plotting fame for an opera singer (Jane Seymour).

Genre: Horror

Original Language: English

Director: Robert Markowitz

Runtime: 1h 40m

Cast & Crew

Maximilian Schell

Sándor Korvin, The Phantom of the Opera

Jane Seymour

Maria Gianelli, Elena Korvin

Michael York

Michael Hartnell

Robert Markowitz

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The Phantom of the Opera

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The Phantom of the Opera (in French , Le Fantôme de l'Opéra ) is a French novel by Gaston Leroux . It was first published as a serialization in Le Gaulois from September 23, 1909 to January 8, 1910. Initially, the novel sold very poorly and was even out of print several times during the twentieth century. Today, it is considered to be a classic of French literature, though it is overshadowed by its many subsequent adaptations.The novel was translated into English in 1911. It has since been adapted many times into film and stage productions, the most notable of which were the 1925 film depiction , 2004 film depiction and Andrew Lloyd Webber 's 1986 musical . The Phantom of the Opera musical is now the longest running Broadway show in history, and one of the most lucrative entertainment enterprises of all time.

Saderik

  • 1 Characters
  • 3 Illustrations
  • 4 Editions of the original novel
  • 5 Adaptations

Characters [ ]

  • Erik — The deformed man (believed to be a ghost), who lives in the catacombs of the opera house and loves Christine.
  • Christine Daae — A young, Swedish soprano.
  • Raoul, Viscount de Chagny — Christine's childhood friend and love interest.
  • The Persian — A mysterious man from Erik's past.
  • Count Philippe de Chagny — Raoul's elder brother.
  • Moncharmin and Richard — The managers of the opera house.
  • Madame Giry — Erik's loyal box-keeper.
  • Meg Giry — Madame Giry's only daughter, a ballet girl.
  • Carlotta — The spoiled prima donna .
  • Joseph Buquet — The chief scene-shifter.
  • Debienne and Poligny — The previous managers of the opera house.
  • La Sorelli — The lead ballet dancer.
  • Little Jammes — A friend of Meg, also a ballet girl.
  • Remy — The manager's secretary.
  • Mercier — The acting-manager.
  • Gabriel — The superstitious chorus-master.
  • Mme. la Baronne de Castelot-Barbezac — Meg as an adult.
  • Mifroid — The commissary of police called in for Christine's disappearance.

Christine Daae's mother died when she was very young. She and her father, a famous fiddler, traveled all over Sweden playing folk and religious music.

Kay

Angel of Music.

{{ Her father was known to be the best wedding fiddler in the land. During Christine's childhood, her father told many stories and a character known as The Angel of Music figured heavily in all of them, especially one about a girl he called Little Lotte, who was able to hear the Angel of Music. When Christine meets Raoul, he also enjoys her father's many stories.

Later, when Father Daae is dying--probably of tuberculosis--he tells Christine that when he dies he will send the Angel of Music to her. Christine grieves for her father endlessly. She lives with an elderly woman whose now deceased husband had been her father's benefactor. The woman, known as "Mamma Valerius" sends Christine to the conservatory, but Christine's singing is not what it once was. Her sorrow and loneliness make it impossible for her to reach her true potential.

Christine is eventually given a position in the chorus at the Paris Opera. Not long after she arrives there, she begins hearing a voice which sings to her and speaks to her. She believes it must be the Angel of Music and asks him if he is. The Voice agrees and offers to teach her "a little bit of heaven's music." The Voice, however, belongs to Erik, a disfigured genius who was on the construction crew when the Opera was built and who secretly built into the cellars a home for himself. He is the Opera ghost (Fantome in French can be translated as both "ghost" and "phantom") who has been exhorting money from Opera management for many years. Unknown to Christine, at least at first, he has fallen in love with her.

With the help of the Voice, Christine triumphs at the gala on the night of the old managers' retirement. Her old childhood friend Raoul hears her and remembers his love for her. After the gala, Erik takes Christine to live in his home in the cellars, but after two weeks, when Christine requests release, he agrees, but only if she wears his ring and is faithful to him. Christine is, for a time, unable to decide between Erik and Raoul and both suitors become increasingly jealous. Up in the rafters of the Opera, Christine tells Raoul of Erik taking her to the cellars. Raoul promises to take Christine away where Erik can never find her the following day, to which Christine agrees, but she pities Erik and will not go until she has sung for him one last time. The two leave, unaware Erik was listening to their conversation. During the week and that night however, Erik had been terrorising anyone who stood in his way, or in the way of Christine's career, including the managers, Carlotta and Raoul.

That night, Erik kidnaps Christine during a production of Faust and attempts to persuade her to marry him. When she does not agree, he offers her a choice: say no, and he will destroy the entire Opera, or say yes and marry him. Christine continues to refuse, until she realizes that Raoul, together with a man known only as "The Persian" who is a figure from Erik's past, have come to rescue her and have, instead, found themselves in a room Erik calls the torture chamber. To save them and the people above, Christine agrees to marry Erik and kisses him. Erik, who admits that he has never before in his life received a kiss--not even by his own mother--is overcome with emotion. He lets Christine go and tells her "go and marry the boy when ever you wish" and "I know you love him." They cry together, and then she leaves. Three weeks later, a notice appears in a Paris newspaper stating that Erik is dead.

  • The Phantom Manor/The Haunted Mansion or is a the Haunted Shrouded Depths in the Disguised manhwa Korean manga clip studios fictional page cartoon (Terrin Aug.)

Illustrations [ ]

The original French book publication of 1910 was illustrated with five oil paintings by André Castaigne.

Roof

The paintings served as an inspiration for the 1925 film , and have appeared in many subsequent reprintings and translations.

An adaptation by Shannon Donnelly was illustrated by Robert Schoolcraft. An adaptation of the French original by Kate McMullan was illustrated by Paul Jennis. The Essential Phantom of the Opera translated and annotated by Leonard Wolf was illustrated by Max Douglas. An adaptation by Doris Dickens was illustrated by Wayne Anderson. An adaptation by Peter F. Neumeyer was illustrated by Don Weller. A Leather-Bound Collectors Edition translation by Alexander Teixeira de Mattos published after the success of Webber's was illustrated by Rick Daskam. Greg Hildebrandt 's illustrated version was published by Unicorn Publishing House. Rachel Perkins's illustrations were published in the 2007 Barnes & Noble Classics edition. A children's adaptation by Jenny Dooley was illustrated by Nathan. 1987 The Complete Phantom of the Opera written by George Perry and published in 1987, covered the opera house, the original Phantom, the author Gaston Leroux, many of the film versions, Andrew Lloyd Webber's musical version, and included the libretto (the complete script) for the Lloyd Webber's musical version with photos and illustrations from the films and the musical (c. 1986). In 2004, the Portuguese newspaper "Público" sold a version of "The Phantom of the Opera" (under the Portuguese name of "O Fantasma da Ópera") illustrated by Isabel Alves.

Editions of the original novel [ ]

  • 1911 The Phantom of the Opera (1911 translation) translated by Alexander Teixeira de Mattos . Published by Bobbs-Merrill (America) and Mills and Boon (Britain). Contains 5 color plates by André Castaigne. Hard cover.
  • 1926 Operaens Hemmelighed translated into Norwegian/Danish by Anna Høyer. Published by V. Pios Boghandel (Norway) - Povl Branner (Denmark). Front cover with Norman Kerry and Marry Philiben from the motion picture from 1925 with Lon Chaney on the cover with red background. clubs
  • 1996 The Essential Phantom of the Opera translated into English by Leonard Wolf. Published by ibooks . Front cover by Sergio Matinez shows Erik taking Christine over the underground lake. Illustrations by Max Douglas. Soft Cover. ISBN 0-7434-9836-4 . Includes an introduction and footnotes by Wolf. And lists of Leroux's works in English and French, and of some Phantom adaptations. This edition was re-released in 2004.
  • 2004 October The Phantom of the Opera adapted into English by Jean-Marc Lofficier and Randy Lofficier . Published by Black Coat Press . [1] Front cover red/black with Erik's face as depicted in the original novel barely visible. Illustrated by 48 different illustrations by 48 different artists depicting anything from Lon Chaney, Andrew Lloyd Webber's Phantom, Gaston Leroux or original concepts. Soft Cover. ISBN 1-932983-13-9 . Also includes the original short story "His Father's Eyes" by the Lofficiers themselves.
  • 2005 Fantomet i Operaet translated into Danish by Lea Brems. Published by Klim . Front cover is a picture from Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Phantom of the Opera . Where Gerard Butler is taking Emmy Rossum to his lair. Only illustration is a picture from the opening night of the Paris Opera. Soft Cover. ISBN 87-7955-384-2 . Afterword by Peter Haning, original published 1985. Wrongfully says that Le Fantôme was published in 1911.

Adaptations [ ]

There have been numerous literary and dramatic works based on The Phantom of the Opera , ranging from light operas to films to children's books. The best known stage and screen adaptations of the novel are probably the 1925 silent film version starring Lon Chaney, Sr. and the 1986 Andrew Lloyd Webber musical . [2] Among novels, Susan Kay 's 1990 Phantom is one of the best known and most beloved by fans, particularly for its in-depth study of Erik's life and experiences. More recently Big Finish released an audio adaptation of the story with success. The most recent movie adaptation was in 2004, directed by Joel Schumacher. It starred Gerard Butler as Erik , Emmy Rossum as Christine Daae , and Patrick Wilson as Viscount Raoul de Chagny .

There was a 2011 stage production at the Royal Albert Hall for the 25th anniversary of the musical. It was filmed and released on DVD. It starred Ramin Karimloo as the Phantom, Sierra Bogess as Christine Daae and Hadley Fraser as Viscount Raoul de Chagny.

  • ↑ http://www.blackcoatpress.com
  • ↑ http://www.phantomoftheoperalondon.com/
  • 1 The Phantom of the Opera
  • 3 Christine Daaé

The Phantom of the Opera - The Phantom of the Opera 1988

The Phantom of the Opera

About this production.

  • Production Staff
  • Opening Night Cast
  • Replacements

Majestic Theatre (Jan 26, 1988 - Apr 16, 2023)

  • Songs music by Andrew Lloyd Webber ; lyrics by Charles Hart Act 1 Sung By Think of Me Carlotta Guidicelli, Christine Daaé and Raoul Angel of Music Christine Daaé and Meg Giry Little Lotte/The Mirror (Angel of Music) Raoul, Christine Daaé and Phantom of the Opera The Phantom of the Opera Phantom of the Opera and Christine Daaé The Music of the Night Phantom of the Opera I Remember/Stranger Than You Dreamt It Christine Daaé and Phantom of the Opera Magical Lasso Joseph Buquet, Meg Giry, Madame Giry and Ballet Chorus of the Opéra Populaire Notes/Prima Donna Monsieur Firmin, Monsieur André, Raoul, Carlotta Guidicelli, Madame Giry, Meg Giry, Ubaldo Piangi and Phantom of the Opera Poor Fool, He Makes Me Laugh Carlotta Guidicelli and Company Why Have You Brought Me Here/Raoul I've Been There Raoul and Christine Daaé All I Ask of You Raoul and Christine Daaé All I Ask of You (Reprise) Phantom of the Opera Act 2 Sung By Masquerade/Why So Silent Full Company Notes/Twisted Every Way Monsieur André, Monsieur Firmin, Carlotta Guidicelli, Ubaldo Piangi, Raoul, Christine Daaé, Madame Giry and Phantom of the Opera Wishing You Were Somehow Here Again Christine Daaé Wandering Child/Bravo, Bravo Phantom of the Opera, Christine Daaé and Raoul The Point of No Return Phantom of the Opera and Christine Daaé Down Once More/Track Down This Murderer Full Company

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A complete guide to all the songs in 'The Phantom of the Opera'

Learn more about the songs in The Phantom of the Opera , including "Masquerade," "All I Ask of You," "The Music of the Night", and "Think of Me."

Marianka Swain

It’s time to listen to the music of the night – otherwise known as Andrew Lloyd Webber’s soaring score for his all-conquering 1986 musical The Phantom of the Opera . Featuring lyrics by Charles Hart, and a libretto co-written by Lloyd Webber and Richard Stilgoe, it’s an epic adaptation of Gaston Leroux’s novel about a masked genius lurking in the sewers beneath the Paris Opera House in the late 19th century.

That lurker would be the Phantom: the musical mentor of young soprano Christine. She becomes the centre of a passionate love triangle, pursued both by the Phantom and by her childhood friend-turned-wealthy patron, Raoul. The show opened in the West End starring Sarah Brightman, Michael Crawford and Steve Barton, and went on to win Olivier and Tony Awards for Best Musical. Find out more about The Phantom of the Opera in London.

Phantom continues to enchant audiences: it’s the longest-running show in Broadway history, and the second-longest-running musical in the West End following Les Misérables . Part of its appeal is the sheer opulent scale, including that famous chandelier. But key to its success, too, is Lloyd Webber’s mighty operatic score. Follow us down into the Phantom’s lair (via His Majesty's Theatre ) as we guide you through the show’s indelible songs.

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“Hannibal Dress Rehearsal”

Phantom has a recurring show-within-a-show element. We open with the fictional cast rehearsing a new production, Hannibal, starring prima donna Carlotta. This scene also packs in some speedy exposition, introducing the audience to the opera house’s new owners, Firmin and Andre, and new patron, the Vicomte de Changy (also known as Raoul) — and also telling us that orphan Christine’s father was a famous violinist. It sets the template for a musical that will constantly whisk between onstage and backstage.

“Think of Me”

Carlotta storms off after a backdrop crashes down from the flies, and Christine takes over her role for that evening’s performance. “Think of Me” is her big aria, but its wistful lyrics also spur Raoul to recognise her as his childhood friend, and to wonder if she too remembers their shared past. It adds emotional heft to — and complicates — Christine’s triumph.

“Angel of Music”

Christine reveals to Meg (daughter of the ballet mistress Madame Giry) that she has a secret tutor, who she calls the Angel of Music. She believes it’s the spirit of her late father — a naïve idea encapsulated by this dreamy little number.

“Little Lotte”

The Angel of Music becomes a point of reconnection for Christine and Raoul when he visits her in her dressing room and asks her out to dinner. Both remember the stories that her father used to tell them, and the song “Little Lotte” that he taught her to sing. He assumes it’s all a fantasy, whereas Christine thinks it’s actually real.

“The Mirror”

Enter the Phantom — and an angry, jealous Phantom. He’s furious that Raoul is sharing in his triumph, and lures Christine away. She meets his fury with a sweet reprise of “Angel of Music.” Finally, he reveals himself to her in her mirror and takes her away.

“The Phantom of the Opera”

The almighty title number! It’s a key duet between Christine and the Phantom as they explore their dynamic: the Phantom has embedded himself in her psyche, and he takes credit for her glorious voice, while she characterises herself as his mask. The music echoes this tussle: both beautiful and ominous, grand as the Opera House and eerie as the sewers.

“The Music of the Night”

After travelling by boat to his hidden lair, the Phantom reveals that he has selected Christine as his muse — and shows her an image in the mirror where she’s wearing a wedding dress. It’s all too much: Christine faints. That brings out the Phantom’s caring side, as he covers her with his cloak and croons this tender song. Listen to the lyrics and you’ll find a sinister juxtaposition between the seductive music and his intent, which is to seduce her with his genius and trap her in the dark with him.

“I Remember”/ “Stranger Than You Dreamt It”

Christine wakes to hear the monkey music box (the one that Raoul will see at the auction in the show’s prologue). As the Phantom sits at the organ, composing his next opus, Christine creeps up to him and removes his mask – revealing his disfigured face. The Phantom roars at her anger, then this tune softens as he admits he yearns to be loved.

“Notes”/ “Prima Donna”

Andre, Firmin and Raoul are all fretting about the mysterious disappearance of their sopranos. But the Phantom has written a series of notes, demanding Christine become the star of his new opera, not Carlotta. The owners appease a furious Carlotta, assuring her that she won’t be replaced. It’s a busy number with lots of cross-currents (and a fun piece of epistolary farce) – a nice contrast to the serious songs we’ve just heard in the sewers.

“Why Have You Brought Me Here?”

After the Phantom sabotaged the performance by reducing Carlotta’s voice to a croak, Christine drags Raoul to the rooftop and confesses all about the Phantom and his dangerous obsession with her. Raoul still thinks it was just a dream.

“All I Ask of You”

Now Raoul gets his big moment – and it’s the polar opposite to the Phantom’s “Music of the Night”. He says that daylight (not the darkness) will dry her tears, and that he will be her shelter and her light. Instead of wanting to control her, he simply asks to be a part of her life. That sentiment is matched by a sweet, gentle, sincere tune – and when Christine matches it, their romance takes flight.

“All I Ask of You (Reprise)”

Uhoh. The Phantom was spying on them and he now uses their love song with which to swear revenge. Watch out for Act Two...

“Masquerade”/ “Why So Silent?”

Phantom ’s second half opens six months later, and in grand style: with a masquerade ball. Masks are being used playfully (as exemplified by the jaunty patter sections with swift, teasing lyrics), and the general tone is jubilant: Christine and Raoul are engaged, and all is well. At least, until the Phantom gate-crashes the party. He has a new opera for them, but demands Christine star – and return to him.

“Notes”/ “Twisted Every Way”

Another knotty plotting number, but the tone is now sombre. Christine is scared that she’s become the Phantom’s prey, and Raoul entreats her to use the opera to trap the Phantom. Will she betray her mentor?

“Wishing You Were Somehow Here Again”

Her loyalties divided, Christine visits her father’s grave. After the frantic opening action, it’s a slow, shimmering number that shifts between warmth and aching melancholy. It’s also an important part of Christine reckoning with the past: in one way or another, she’s been haunted throughout the show, and (in the song’s big climax) now needs to find the strength to fight for her future.

“Wandering Child”

The Phantom isn’t going away just yet. He appears to Christine in the cemetery, once again seducing her with the power of his voice and “Angel of Music” genius – until Raoul breaks the spell.

“Don Juan Triumphant”/ “The Point of No Return”

That’s the title of the Phantom’s new opera, which we now hear rehearsed by Christine, Carlotta and the chorus. The Phantom gate-crashes once again, taking on the part of Don Juan so he can sing lyrics with a double meaning to Christine: “In your mind you’ve already succumbed to me… no use resisting: abandon thought, and let the dream descend.” But are they really “past the point of no return”?

The Phantom then uses a reprise of “All I Ask of You” to propose to Christine. However, before he can finish, she unmasks him – and they discover the corpse of the actor he murdered. Game over.

“Down Once More”/ “Track Down This Murderer”

As an angry mob vows to hunt down the Phantom, he escapes to his lair with a captive Christine. Raoul follows, and the Phantom threatens to kill him unless Christine stays. Finally, Christine realises the truth: his haunted face holds no horror for her – it’s in his soul “that the true distortion lies”. She decides to show him pity and kindness, and kisses him.

That thaws the Phantom’s heart, and he releases the two of them; they depart with a final reprise of “All I Ask of You,” leaving the Phantom alone with his “Music of the Night.”

See more shows in the West End

Recommended shows - Mamma Mia!

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Photo credit: The Phantom of the Opera (Photo courtesy of production)

Originally published on Mar 1, 2023 16:15

Gerard Butler's 'Phantom of the Opera' Was Good, You Guys Are Just Mean

Underrated? Maybe. Over-hated? Definitely.

Ah, yes, everyone's favorite or least favorite musical movie. A film that you can ask someone about, and they will either sing its praises with fond nostalgia or go on an hour-long rant about how it's the greatest misuse of a stage production of all time . The Joel Schumacher-directed The Phantom of the Opera is by far not the worst adaptation of Gaston Leroux 's novel, those who have seen the 1998 Dario Argento film can verify, but it sure isn't the best. When I first became obsessed with the masked musician, I had many unkind words for the 2004 movie, and it's not as if all of my complaints were unfounded.

There are reasons that this movie is so polarizing. While the production is gorgeous, Alexandra Byrne 's costumes are amazing, the sets are sweeping, and the orchestra is on point, in short: it's a pretty movie. But how it fails is the two things the Andrew Lloyd Webber musical needs: it needs the depth of emotionality, and even more importantly it needs a great cast of actors to tie it all together.

RELATED: Andrew Lloyd Webber's Movie Musicals, Ranked

Patrick Wilson as Raoul De Chagny is a total exception; he was brilliant, perfect for the role, even. The supporting cast was also perfectly fine, but that's not where the real issue is, because the two characters people have their eyes on are the ingénue Christine Daae, here played by Emmy Rossum, and the Opera Ghost himself, played by none other than Gerard Butler . Rossum's issue was plain and simple: She was way too young, being 17 years old at the time of filming. This is even more uncomfortable considering how hard they leaned into the romantic and seductive elements of the story, given that both Wilson and Butler were twice her age.

Why Don't People Like Gerard Butler's Phantom?

Butler, on the other hand, is a whole other story, and a lot of it comes down to being given the burden of playing such an iconic character. This film has a very, very long production history, being in the works since the days of Sarah Brightman and Michael Crawford, who were originally considered before it became way too late. A lot of actors were considered to play the eponymous role, including Hugh Jackman and Antonio Banderas, which maybe would've been a shock to average moviegoers, but not to those in the know. Why didn't they just pull a Jesus Christ Superstar and cast understudies from the Broadway or West End production? I don't know. No matter which direction they went in, someone was bound to be upset either way. Eventually, Butler was cast, and people had some notes.

Let's get the complaints out of the way. No, Butler was not a classically trained singer, and his performance is at times mentioned in the same category as Pierce Brosman in Mamma Mia and Russell Crowe in Les Misérables. He wasn't awful, but a character like the Phantom needs to be more than not awful, being one of the most enduring and iconic roles in all of musical theater. The deformity that condemned him to a life of violence and seclusion looked more like a bad rash.

Those who took issue with this version of the Phantom just didn't like how purposefully attractive they made him, which is a perfectly valid issue to have. That was the direction that they went with for this film in most regards. The costumes are the same way, as are a lot of the directions for the performances. It's considerably easier to tell when comparing the film and the stage production side by side where the weaknesses are.

He Might Be Underrated, But He Was Absolutely Over-Hated

However, none of this is Butler's fault, and he tried his absolute best. He was not an experienced singer before shooting this film. He was in a rock band as a student, and he was aware of how strange it was to be in that position. But both Schumacher and Webber believed Butler's singing voice had an edge to it that they felt fit the character, and Butler put the hard work in to be ready for this movie. More importantly, in spite of the idea that the director and producer, Andrew Lloyd Webber, had in their head for the Phantom, which was more of the darker side of a love triangle than a sympathetic villain, Gerard's performance as the Phantom is actually pretty underrated.

This role makes so much sense when you learn that it was his performance in Dracula 2000 that drew Schumacher's eye, playing a darkly brooding, revenge-driven monster. Singing aside, which really was just fine, where Butler shines is in the acting performance of The Phantom. He almost works in spite of the emotionally clumsy direction, and the whole Mills & Boon vibe the movie had. He wasn't afraid to go to a terrifying and ugly place when he needed to, like in the murders, and at the moment when Christine rips off his mask. He played the role as if his charm is a very fragile veneer for something furious and unstable. He can act superior around the people he's haunting, throwing his voice around and openly mocking the Opera House staff because he knows they're too scared to do anything about it, but when Christine shows him affection, he fully breaks down and weeps like a lost little kid.

An Olive Branch For 2004's Phantom

The Phantom, as a character in any of his many adaptations, is one with a lot of layers. Just watching one man slowly chip away bit by bit until the ending gives way to the center: Someone who has been devoid of love his entire life and is desperately crying for help. Butler plays his layers quite well. Starting off with seductive, dominant, and alluring, then becoming volatile and domineering, and the Final Lair where he stands in front of Christine and just starts sobbing. It still gets me, Gerard Butler had his moments as The Phantom, and does it with an edge and a danger that someone who would go on to play Leonidas could give it.

I really do anticipate that both camps won't really be happy with my conclusion, either in saying that Gerard Butler as the Phantom is okay, or in saying that it was just okay. I think it's time this film moved into the same territory as the first Twilight movie, and that we, those who really didn't like this movie, made peace with its existence. The first eight years were undeniably hard, at a loss for any other version of the Andrew Lloyd Webber musical that was accessible. But 2012 came along, and the 25th-anniversary performance at the Royal Albert Hall was released on DVD. So if you want a definitive version with a cast that many consider to be the best, there it is. There is so much more to the story beyond one musical and one movie , needless to say, Gerard Butler's Phantom is not the end of the world. Was it the greatest musical adaptation ever? No, far from it. But it had its strengths, and there are people out there who do love it, and now that I'm older, and hopefully wiser, I can kind of see why.

The Phantom of the Opera (1983)

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In Budapest a young operatic soprano Elena Korvin is struggling to rehearse the part of Marguerite in the Opera Gounod's Faust despite the assistance from her loving husband Sandor Korvin , the orchestra's conductor. The Opera House's owner Baron Hunyadi attempts to win Elena's heart to draw her away from her husband but Elena refuses. She leaves with a fearful threat from Hunyadi that her career will end. Elena loses hope of succeeding in the role believing she is not good enough. But Korvin insists that she is and proves so by convincing her to be calm and confident. In revenge for Elena refusal the baron bribes a man (who had already made a deal with Korvin to help encourage Elena during the show) to make the audience boo and despise Elena during her debut. He also bribes the critic to write a bad review about her. Completely heartbroken Elena jumps into the river, drowning herself. A vengeful Korvin murders the man who drove the audience against his wife, then he goes to confront the critic Kraus . During a struggle the office catches fire. Korvin murders Kraus but a bottle of sulphuric acid falls over on a shelf and splashes on to Korvin's face badly burning him. He is saved from the fire by the rat catcher Lajos who hides him in the cellars beneath the Opera house. Lajos steals a mask from the costume department to hide Korvin's deformity caused by the acid. From then on Sandor Korvin becomes the "Opera Ghost" AKA The Phantom of the Opera.

Four years later, Faust is being performed again. The selfish leading soprano Madame Brigida Bianchi refuses to follow the direction from the show's English director Michael Hartnell . The spoiled diva accuses everyone in the show being the reason for her problems and walks away. Hartnell offers Baron Hunyadi to take over the show. But Hunyadi refuses due to his "personal relationship" with Madame Bianchi. So Hartnell holds an understudy audition for the role of Marguerite. A young Italian/American soprano Maria Gianelli , performs a perfect audition which amazes everyone and she is granted the role. The Phantom who also witnessed the audition is interested in Maria, not just because of her voice, but because she bears a remarkable resemblance to Elena. He vows to help her and that her triumph will be his revenge.

Hartnell and Maria begin to develop romantic feelings for each other during the first few days of rehearsals. The Phantom slips an insulting note to Madame Bianchi. The diva accuses Maria believing she sent the note. Despite Maria's denial, Madame Bianchi declares that she never wants to see Maria in the theatre again. At home Maria sits sadly. When her lights unexpectedly turn off she is approached by The Phantom. At first she is afraid of his masked face but he assures her the mask is to protect her. He says he wants to help make her a great singer and offers her the key to a place to meet him and where she can learn. Maria accepts his offer taking the key.

The next day Maria finds the key is to a huge and beautiful house. In one room she finds a wardrobe of dresses and a framed photo of Elena on a vanity. Maria is confused by the resemblance between her and the blonde woman. When The Phantom arrives he tells Maria that he'd like her to wear the dresses while they are rehearsing, that she will tell no one of him and devote her days to the lessons. As the days go by Maria's voice improves strongly with her lessons. Due to constant pranks from The Phantom, Madame Bianchi leaves which makes Maria the new leading lady. Hartnell and Maria fall in love each other. But Hartnell is choked at the Turkish spa by The Phantom, threatening Hartnell to stay away from Maria. Hartnell decides to postpone Maria's debut, believing she is not ready. Maria sends a note to The Phantom to meet her at the Masked Ball.

At the masked ball, Hunyadi attempts to win Maria’s affections but just like Elena, Maria turns down the Baron’s advances. She is then met by The Phantom who wears a mask resembling his original face and the two of them dance. The Phantom tells her not to see Hartnell again and they will be together forever. She flees from the ball but is kidnapped along with Hunyadi by Lajos and taken to the Phantom’s lair. Maria is knocked out when she attempts to escape again. Hunyadi realizes The Phantom’s true identity is Sandor Korvin, he promises that if he is freed he will make Maria the star Elena should have been. Korvin frees the baron but when Hunyadi enters his car he is pecked to death by birds. His body is then discovered hanging from a backdrop above the stage.

When Maria awakens the Phantom says that she will remain underground with him so she won’t suffer as his wife did. Maria says that if he lets her go she would return. But the Phantom assures her that in his heart he is good and he wants her to love him. While caressing him she rips away his mask revealing his burned deformed face. Angered, Korvin declares that Maria will never leave the underground. He reveals a dead girl’s body dressed in Maria’s ball dress, he declares that when her body is discovered the police will believe the corpse is Maria’s. Korvin leaves to dump the body while Lajos watches over Maria. Hartnell who has been tracking Korvin discovers the lair by hearing Maria’s singing. Lajos gets knocked out and Hartnell helps Maria escape. Korvin murders Lajos for failing to guard Maria and disappears from the underground. The police inspector and Hartnell plan to capture Korvin in the theatre during a performance with Maria as bait sitting in the audience.

On the night, Korvin plans to drop the chandelier on the inspector who is sat directly beneath it. Maria swaps seats with the inspector because she feels unsafe in the opera box she was originally seated. Korvin who is on the chandelier sawing through its chain spots Maria sitting down beneath the chandelier. Fearfully he tries to get back up to prevent the chandelier falling on her, but the chain breaks and both fall down. Maria sees it falling and gets away just in time with the other audience members. Korvin dies from the fall and lies with his mask fallen from his deformed face.

  • Maximilian Schell as Sandor Korvin
  • Jane Seymour as Maria Gianelli / Elena Korvin
  • Michael York as Michael Hartnell
  • Jeremy Kemp as Baron Hunyadi
  • Diana Quick as Brigida Bianchi
  • Gellért Raksányi as Lajos
  • Philip Stone as Kraus
  • 1 Winslow Leach
  • 2 Erik (Ramin Karimloo)
  • 3 The Dwarf

IMAGES

  1. Phantom of the Opera (1983)

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  2. The Phantom of the Opera (1983 film)

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  3. The Phantom of the Opera

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  4. The Phantom of the Opera

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  5. 31 Days of Horror: October 18th: The Phantom of The Opera (1983)

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  6. 25 Years Strong, 'Phantom Of The Opera' Kills And Kills Again : NPR

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COMMENTS

  1. The Phantom of the Opera

    The Phantom of the Opera (1983 TV movie) [ de], a 1983 TV film starring Maximilian Schell The Phantom of the Opera (1989 film), a film starring Robert Englund The Phantom of the Opera (1998 film), an Italian film directed by Dario Argento The Phantom of the Opera (2004 film), an adaptation of the Andrew Lloyd Webber musical

  2. Adaptations of The Phantom of the Opera

    Phantom of the Horse Opera (1961): A Woody Woodpecker cartoon. The Phantom of the Opera (1962): Hammer Horror version featuring Herbert Lom and Heather Sears. This version has the Phantom playing the Toccata and Fugue in D Minor by Johann Sebastian Bach on the organ - which has become a cultural trope indicating tragic horror.

  3. The Phantom of the Opera (TV Movie 1983)

    1983 1h 36m IMDb RATING 5.5 /10 433 YOUR RATING Rate Drama Horror The Budapest Opera House's diva commits suicide after the owner ruins her career for having rejected his advances but her conductor-husband, believed killed in a fire, plans his revenge on all those he deems responsible for her suicide. Director Robert Markowitz Writers Gaston Leroux

  4. The Phantom of The Opera (1983)

    The Phantom of the (1983) was a US TV Series loosely adapted from the original Novel of the same name written by Sherman Yellen and directed by Robert Markowitz staring Maximilian Schell, Jane Seymour and Michael York as the three leads, the series uses several elements from other film versions of Phantom. Plot

  5. Phantom of the Opera

    The Phantom of the Opera Wiki is a collaborative encyclopedia for everything and anything about the Phantom of the Opera! The Phantom of the Opera was first written by Gaston Leroux, and originated from the novel he wrote in 1910. Since then, the story has inspired the creation of many films, books, and musicals!. This wiki, and all 108 of its pages, exists because of the hard word of many ...

  6. The Phantom of the Opera (1983)

    The Phantom of the Opera (1983) is a film adaptation of The Phantom of the Opera (1910), and was directed by Robert Markowitz. In Budapest a young operatic soprano Elena Korvin is struggling to rehearse the part of Marguerite in the opera Gounod 's Faust despite the assistance from her loving husband Sándor Korvin, the orchestra's conductor.

  7. Phantom of the Opera (1983)

    Michael York is the opera producer who has taken a romantic interest in the lookalike (comparable to the Nelson Eddy role in the 1943 version). Lon Chaney had played The Phantom in the 1925 movie, Claude Rains in 1943, and Herbert Lom in 1962. Gaston Leroux was not credited as the author of this timeless novel.

  8. The Phantom of the Opera (TV Movie 1983)

    The Phantom of the Opera (TV Movie 1983) - Full Cast & Crew - IMDb Edit The Phantom of the Opera (1983 TV Movie) Full Cast & Crew See agents for this cast & crew on IMDbPro Directed by Robert Markowitz Writing Credits (in alphabetical order) Cast (in credits order) Produced by Music by Ralph Burns Cinematography by Larry Pizer Editing by

  9. The Phantom of the Opera (1983) (Film)

    The Phantom of the Opera is a Made-for-TV Movie adaptation of The Phantom of the Opera released in 1983. Sándor Korvin ( Maximilian Schell ), the conductor at the Budapest Opera House, is training his wife Elena ( Jane Seymour (Actress)) for the role of Marguerite in Faust.

  10. The Phantom of the Opera: History and Facts Infographic

    January 24, 2022. Now in its 34th year, The Phantom of the Opera is the Broadway musical all others are measured against. The timeless story, the unforgettable score, an undeniable obsession that could never die. Experience the haunting love story that has captivated New York and the world. Andrew Lloyd Webber's mesmerizing score, along with ...

  11. The Phantom of the Opera: All you need to know about the legendary

    The Phantom of the Opera is based on the 1910 French novel of the same name by Gaston Leroux. The musical tells the story of Christine Daaé, a soprano at the Paris Opéra House. Beneath the opera house lives a mysterious, masked musical genius who becomes obsessed with Christine.

  12. Discover the real history behind 'The Phantom of the Opera'

    In The Phantom of the Opera book and musical, the Phantom cuts the whole chandelier loose during the curtain call of the opera Il Muto, in order to exact revenge on Christine for falling in love with Raoul instead of him. Luckily, no one in the musical dies from the crash. The Paris Opera House really has an underground lake.

  13. The Phantom of The Opera (1983)

    Starring:Maximilian SchellJane SeymourMichael York

  14. The Phantom of the Opera (2004 film)

    Produced and co-written by Lloyd Webber and directed by Joel Schumacher, it stars Gerard Butler in the title role, with Emmy Rossum, Patrick Wilson, Miranda Richardson, Minnie Driver, Simon Callow, Ciarán Hinds, Victor McGuire, and Jennifer Ellison in supporting roles.

  15. The Phantom of the Opera

    The Phantom of the Opera (French: Le Fantôme de l'Opéra) is a French novel by Gaston Leroux.It was published in 1910. An English edition came out a year later.. The book was adapted to a musical by Andrew Lloyd Webber in 1986. The musical was made into a movie in 2004. Movie versions include one starring Lon Chaney in 1925, one from 1943 with Claude Rains, another from 1962 with Herbert ...

  16. The Phantom of the Opera

    Movie Info. An acid-scarred conductor (Maximilian Schell) lives in the sewers of 1910 Budapest, plotting fame for an opera singer (Jane Seymour). Genre: Horror. Original Language: English.

  17. The Phantom of the Opera

    The Phantom of the Opera (in French, Le Fantôme de l'Opéra) is a French novel by Gaston Leroux. It was first published as a serialization in Le Gaulois from September 23, 1909 to January 8, 1910. Initially, the novel sold very poorly and was even out of print several times during the twentieth century.

  18. The Phantom of the Opera

    The Phantom of the Opera (Original, Musical, Drama, Broadway) opened in New York City Jan 26, 1988 and played through Apr 16, 2023.

  19. A complete guide to all the songs in 'The Phantom of the Opera'

    It's time to listen to the music of the night - otherwise known as Andrew Lloyd Webber's soaring score for his all-conquering 1986 musical The Phantom of the Opera.Featuring lyrics by Charles Hart, and a libretto co-written by Lloyd Webber and Richard Stilgoe, it's an epic adaptation of Gaston Leroux's novel about a masked genius lurking in the sewers beneath the Paris Opera House in ...

  20. The Phantom of the Opera (miniseries)

    The Phantom of the Opera is a disfigured musician named Erik who lives below the Opéra Garnier in Paris. He has a large part in managing each performance until his friend Gerard Carriere is dismissed.

  21. The Phantom of the Opera (1983)

    Is The Phantom of the Opera (1983) streaming on Netflix, Disney+, Hulu, Amazon Prime Video, HBO Max, Peacock, or 50+ other streaming services? Find out where you can buy, rent, or subscribe to a streaming service to watch it live or on-demand. Find the cheapest option or how to watch with a free trial.

  22. Gerard Butler's 'Phantom of the Opera' Actually Wasn't That Bad

    An Olive Branch For 2004's Phantom. The Phantom, as a character in any of his many adaptations, is one with a lot of layers. Just watching one man slowly chip away bit by bit until the ending ...

  23. The Phantom of the Opera (1983)

    The Phantom of the Opera (1983) Directed by Robert Markowitz Released in 1983 Cast Maximilian Schell Jane Seymour Michael York Jeremy Kemp Gellért Raksányi Music by Ralph Burns John Cacavas The Phantom of the Opera is a TV film adaptation of Gaston Leroux's Le Fantôme de l'Opéra released in 1983 and directed by Robert Markowitz . Plot

  24. The Phantom of the Opera (novel)

    The Phantom of the Opera (French: Le Fantôme de l'Opéra) is a novel by French author Gaston Leroux.It was first published as a serial in Le Gaulois from 23 September 1909 to 8 January 1910, and was released in volume form in late March 1910 by Pierre Lafitte. The novel is partly inspired by historical events at the Paris Opera during the nineteenth century, and by an apocryphal tale ...