The Sea Anchor Technique

Discover the sea anchor technique, a valuable tool for managing your boat in rough seas and ensuring the safety of your crew and vessel.

Sailing the open seas is an exhilarating and rewarding experience, but it can also be challenging and unpredictable. One of the most important skills a sailor can possess is the ability to handle heavy weather conditions. In this article, we will explore the sea anchor technique, a valuable tool for managing your boat in rough seas and ensuring the safety of your crew and vessel.

Table of Contents

What is a sea anchor, types of sea anchors, when to use a sea anchor, how to deploy a sea anchor, retrieving a sea anchor, sea anchor maintenance and storage.

A sea anchor, also known as a drift anchor or drogue, is a device used to stabilize a boat in heavy weather conditions. It is designed to create drag in the water, slowing the boat’s drift and helping to maintain a desired heading. This can be particularly useful in situations where the wind and waves are pushing the boat off course or causing it to pitch and roll excessively.

Sea anchors come in various shapes and sizes, but they all serve the same basic purpose: to provide a controlled resistance against the force of the wind and waves. By doing so, they can help to reduce the strain on the boat’s rigging and hull, minimize the risk of damage, and improve the comfort and safety of the crew.

There are several different types of sea anchors available, each with its own unique design and characteristics. Some of the most common types include:

Parachute Sea Anchors

Parachute sea anchors are the most popular type of sea anchor and are often considered the most effective. They consist of a large, parachute-shaped fabric canopy that is attached to the boat via a long line, or rode. When deployed, the parachute fills with water and creates a significant amount of drag, helping to stabilize the boat and maintain its position relative to the wind and waves.

Cone Sea Anchors

Cone sea anchors are similar in concept to parachute sea anchors but feature a conical shape instead of a parachute canopy. They are typically made from heavy-duty fabric or mesh and are designed to create drag by funneling water through the cone as the boat drifts. Cone sea anchors are generally smaller and more compact than parachute sea anchors, making them easier to store and deploy.

Drift Socks

Drift socks, also known as drift anchors or trolling bags, are a lightweight and compact alternative to traditional sea anchors. They are typically made from nylon or polyester fabric and are designed to create drag by filling with water as the boat drifts. Drift socks are often used by anglers to slow their drift while fishing, but they can also be used as a temporary sea anchor in moderate weather conditions.

There are several situations in which a sea anchor can be a valuable tool for managing your boat in heavy weather:

Storm Tactics: In extreme conditions, a sea anchor can help to keep the boat’s bow pointed into the wind and waves, reducing the risk of broaching or capsizing. This can be particularly important for boats with a high windage profile or a tendency to round up in strong winds.

Heaving-to: A sea anchor can be used in conjunction with the boat’s sails and rudder to create a stable “heave-to” position, allowing the crew to rest, make repairs, or wait out a storm.

Drift Control: In situations where maintaining a specific position or heading is critical, a sea anchor can help to slow the boat’s drift and provide greater control over its movement.

Emergency Steering: If the boat’s rudder or steering system becomes damaged or inoperable, a sea anchor can be used as a makeshift steering device by adjusting the rode length and attachment point.

Deploying a sea anchor requires careful planning and preparation to ensure that it is effective and safe. Here are the basic steps to follow:

Choose the Right Sea Anchor: Select a sea anchor that is appropriate for your boat’s size, displacement, and intended use. Consult the manufacturer’s guidelines or seek advice from experienced sailors to determine the best option for your needs.

Prepare the Rode: Attach a suitable length of line or rope to the sea anchor, taking into account the depth of the water and the expected sea conditions. The rode should be strong enough to withstand the forces generated by the sea anchor and should be equipped with a swivel to prevent twisting.

Attach a Trip Line: A trip line is a secondary line that is attached to the sea anchor and used to retrieve it once it is no longer needed. Attach a float or buoy to the end of the trip line to make it easier to locate and retrieve.

Secure the Sea Anchor to the Boat: Attach the rode to a strong point on the boat, such as a cleat or a dedicated sea anchor attachment point. Ensure that the attachment point is strong enough to withstand the forces generated by the sea anchor and that the rode is properly secured to prevent it from coming loose.

Deploy the Sea Anchor: Lower the sea anchor into the water, allowing it to fill with water and create drag. Adjust the rode length and attachment point as needed to achieve the desired heading and drift rate.

Monitor the Sea Anchor: Keep a close eye on the sea anchor and its attachment points to ensure that it is functioning properly and not causing any damage to the boat. Make adjustments as needed to maintain the desired heading and drift rate.

Retrieving a sea anchor can be a challenging and potentially dangerous task, particularly in heavy weather conditions. Here are some tips to help make the process safer and more manageable:

Wait for the Right Conditions: If possible, wait for a lull in the wind and waves before attempting to retrieve the sea anchor. This will make the task easier and reduce the risk of injury or damage to the boat.

Use the Trip Line: Locate the float or buoy attached to the trip line and carefully pull it in, taking care not to become entangled in the rode or sea anchor. Once the trip line is fully retrieved, the sea anchor should be close enough to the boat to be easily lifted out of the water.

Take Your Time: Retrieving a sea anchor can be physically demanding, particularly if it is large or heavily loaded with water. Take your time and use appropriate lifting techniques to avoid injury or strain.

Inspect the Sea Anchor: Once the sea anchor is safely on board, inspect it for any signs of damage or wear. Repair or replace any damaged components as needed to ensure that it remains in good working order.

Proper maintenance and storage are essential for ensuring the longevity and effectiveness of your sea anchor. Here are some tips to help keep your sea anchor in top condition:

Clean and Dry: After each use, rinse the sea anchor thoroughly with fresh water to remove any salt, sand, or debris. Allow it to dry completely before storing it to prevent mold and mildew growth.

Inspect for Damage: Regularly inspect the sea anchor for any signs of damage or wear, such as frayed lines, torn fabric, or corroded hardware. Repair or replace any damaged components as needed.

Store Properly: Store the sea anchor in a cool, dry place away from direct sunlight and extreme temperatures. Avoid folding or compressing the sea anchor, as this can cause creases or damage to the fabric.

The sea anchor technique is an invaluable skill for any sailor venturing into the open ocean. By understanding the different types of sea anchors, knowing when to deploy one, and mastering the deployment and retrieval process, you can greatly improve your ability to handle heavy weather conditions and ensure the safety of your crew and vessel. With proper maintenance and storage, your sea anchor will serve you well for many adventures to come.

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How to Deploy and Use a Sea Anchor or Drogue

How to Deploy and Use a Sea Anchor or Drogue

Sea Anchor, Storm Drogue, Sea Brake, Parachute Anchor, Drift Sock: these are several names used to describe devices deployed to create drag on a vessel in open water. No matter how many different monikers you find out there, they are referring to one of two types, 1) a parachute or cone shaped piece of fabric dragged from the bow (most accurately called a Sea Anchor), or 2) a fabric cone or series of cones dragged from the stern (most accurately called a Drogue). In this article we’ll look at the differences between the two, their uses, and how to deploy and retrieve them.

To Stop or to Slow

This illustration highlights the main differences between Sea Anchors and Drogues. More detail follows below.

drogue-vs-sea-anchor

The primary use of a Sea Anchor is to stop the drift of a vessel downwind and keep her bow windward, into the waves.

Sea anchor parachute

Sea Anchors are set off the bow. You would use a Sea Anchor in open seas where ground tackle is not possible or practical and you want to hold position in moderate to high winds and seas. They are often deployed to wait out a storm, or in emergencies when there is a loss of power and you need to keep the boat from turning beam to the waves or drifting into obstacles such as shoals. Sea Anchors are generally larger than Drogues, and parachute shaped.

A Drogue on the other hand, is used to slow down rather that stop a vessel in following seas.

drogue seabrake

Drogues are deployed off the stern. You would use a Drogue to stay stern to the waves and to keep your boat from surfing, therefore reducing the chances of broaching or pitchpoling. A Drogue can also be used as a steering assist in case of power and/or rudder problems. As well, fishers use Drogues to slow their drift for trolling without a motor. Drogues are generally smaller than Sea Anchors and cone shaped.

Tackle requirements

Tackle

Anchor rode should be similar in size and strength to what you use for regular anchoring. The general rule of thumb is to carry 10’ of rode for every foot LOA to use with your drift anchor. A length of chain (up to about 20% of the length of your rode) is also helpful to achieve the best angle on the drift anchor and avoid chafe. The cleats you use to tie off your drift anchor lines must also be very secure, ideally, they should have backing plates to handle the extra stress. Your rode should be made of nylon for its elasticity. You will need a trip line and floats for anchor recovery. The trip line does not need to be strong but is best if it floats, so use polypropalene, 1/4” to 3/8” braided. Drift anchors tend to turn in the water, so use a stainless steel swivel between anchor and rode. Finally, have chafe protection on hand to use where ropes touch your boat when the anchor is deployed.

First, ensure none of your rode is tangled and that it is ready to pay out from coil. Make sure everyone is standing clear so that legs won’t get caught in lines. All line segments should be secured with shackles or swivels and seizing wire should be used for added safety.

  • The trip line and floats go out first, remember to deploy sea anchors from the bow and drogues from the stern. Allow the trip line to drift out and clear.
  • Toss the drift anchor in next, making sure to toss it into clear water.
  • As the boat drifts away from the anchor, pay out about 50’ of rode and snub the line with half a turn on the cleat just to hold it momentarily. Wait a minute or so for the drift anchor to open.
  • Note: for drift fishing in favorable conditions, you don’t need a lot of scope. Start with 15’ of line to open the anchor, and then as needed let out 10’ at a time until you have a steady comfortable tension.
  • Secure your rode to your cleat or a prepared bridal if you have a multi-hulled vessel.
  • Add chafe guards where necessary

Getting your drift anchor back on board is simple if you use a trip line (highly recommended). Motor to your trip line float circling so as not to run afoul of your rode or anchor. Use a boat hook to grab the float as you would a mooring buoy and haul the trip line in. Since the line is attached to the apex of the cone or chute, pulling in this line empties the anchor of water, allowing you to haul it into the boat easily.

Final Thoughts

Published January 24, 2020

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SailHow

How Anchors Work and All You Need to Know about Anchoring

sailboat sea anchor

In this article, you will not only learn all the basics about anchors. You even get all the more advanced knowledge you need about how anchors work. Use the table of content if you search for an answer on a specific topic.

How Does An Anchor Hold A Ship?

sailboat sea anchor

The primary force holding an anchored ship in place is the weight of the chain on the bottom of the sea.

The wind will push the boat away from the anchor and keep the chain in place.

Most anchors have flukes designed to dig into the ground. If the anchor is in the correct position, it will dig in deeper when wind or waves put pressure on the chain.

As you can see in the drawing, the anchor digs deeper into the seabed if the chain is pulled horizontally away from it.

To retrieve the anchor, the lift must be made vertically. This will happen when you pull in the chain, and the boat is directly above the anchor.

How Deep Do Ship Anchors Go?

Does a boat anchor have to touch the bottom.

Yes, all anchors rest on the seabed. An anchor is designed in such a way that it digs into the seabed and holds the boat from moving away. An anchor works together with a chain.

One exception is a drogue which I will get back to later.

How Much Chain Do You Need?

As a rule of thumb, you need a chain in the amount of 5 to 7 times the depth of the water.

How much anchor line should you use if the water is 20 feet deep? With the above-mentioned rule, you would need at least 100 feet of chain.

How Deep Do Sea Anchors Go?

As stated above, how deep an anchor goes depends on the depth of the sea combined with the length of the chain . This is why it is not possible to anchor in deep seas, you simply cannot carry that much chain.

Coasters, ferries, and other large commercial ships like dry bulkers and tankers often anchor longer from the cost than leisure boats or even at special anchor areas defined by port authorities. They have a bigger draft (deeper keel) and need a lot of space to maneuver in.

How Does A Ship Anchor Work In Deep Water?

In deep water, as I have already said, it requires a substantial amount of chain to touch the bottom. That’s why instead of an anchor, they use a large and strong underwater “parachute” also known as a  storm drogue that provides a drag, which acts as a brake.

As this sea parachute is made out of fabric, it can be stored away easily. A drogue will not hold the ship in place but slow you down significantly.

In emergencies, you could use almost anything as a drogue. A plastic bag, the bag from a sail or similar.

Types of Anchors

There are generally spoken three types of modern anchor designs. The fluke anchor, the plow anchor, and the claw anchor. They all work by digging into the seabed.

Older anchor types “grabs on” rather than dig in, making them less effective than the modern models.

Both the fluke, the plow, and the claw anchor are designed with a top and a bottom. The bottom is heavier than the top, which means that it almost always turns correctly when it lands on the seabed.

Fluke Anchor

Fluke anchors are very popular on small boats and with good reason.

  • It is Lightweight
  • It stoves away very easily (folds up and takes only a little storage room)
  • It holds well in mud or sand

On the negative side, the fluke anchor doesn’t hold very well on grassy or rocky surfaces.

Plow Anchor

Plow anchors are a safer choice if you need an all-around anchor for your boat.

Plow anchors have fixed shanks and look like a plow.

  • It reset itself if the wind or current changes direction
  • Holds effectively in grass, mud, and sand

On the negative side is the higher weight and need for a storage room.

Claw Anchor

A claw anchor is the cheapest type of modern anchor due to its simple design. It holds okay in any seabed but is a bit harder to handle, in my opinion. Its design is adapted from anchors used to secure oil rigs in the North Sea.

Like the plow anchor, it does not fold away and takes up a lot of storage room.

Anchor types are often named after the manufacturer who invented it, but you will find many copies with another brand name. A good example is the Bruce anchor (the claw anchor), which is a brand but also often referred to as a particular type of anchor. Bruce does not produce this type of anchor anymore, but you will find others who do.

The Weight Of The Anchor

The weight of the anchor depends on how heavy your ship is. But most important is to look at the anchor manufacturer’s suggested size.

And remember that anchor weight cannot stand alone, you also need a chain to hold the anchor. This chain acts as a shock absorber.

It is found that for small boats, one pound of anchors for every foot of boat length, is a general rule of thumb.

Suppose you have a 25’ boat, so you need a 20-25lb Bruce anchor with 50’ of 1/4 chain and 500 feet of chain to anchor in 100’ of water comfortably.

Why Do Some Ships Have 2 Anchors?

There is more than one reason why a ship would carry two anchors:

  • Different anchors are needed for different seabeds
  • Staying put instead of moving in circles
  • For various safety reasons

Most of the time one anchor is enough to keep the ship in place but sometimes ships need to set 2 anchors to keep them in place.

Some ships carry an extra anchor because anchors can be easily lost due to various reasons like heavy wind, bad weather, strong current, etc.

Most ships have 2 anchors because with only one anchor you can move in a circle and with another, you are positioned in one place.

What Happens If An Anchor Gets Stuck?

Anchors are sometimes left behind because they get stuck, and anchors do get stuck from time to time, especially if you are not using a windlass. If this happens, the anchor will lay on the bottom of the sea until rusted and sanded into small particles of metal.

Many sailors have experienced lifting their anchor and accidentally retrieving an old anchor too.

Why Do Ships Lose Their Anchors?

Here are some of the most common reasons why ships sometimes lose their anchor:

  • Inadequate securing
  • Equipment failures
  • Broken anchor line 
  • Abandoned anchor
  • Environmental risk factors

Inadequate Securing

Not operating the anchor gear sufficiently is a common reason for losing the anchor. Especially not securing the end of the line or chain while focusing on other maneuvers happens very often. Having a suitable and rehearsed procedure will prevent this from happening in most cases. 

Equipment Failures

sailboat sea anchor

The anchor chain gets rusty, and lines lose their strength with age. It is essential to maintain all gear on a boat and to review all equipment regularly. 

Rusty Anchor Line 

Anchor lines are exposed if someone sails across them, and get the line in their prop. The prop can get damaged, but also the anchor line is likely to brake. That is why it is crucial to stay clear of anchored vessels.  Many ships today do not use anchor lines and have only anchor chains, making anchoring more safe.

Abandoned Anchor

Ships sometimes have to leave the anchor behind, if the anchor is stuck – This happens only rarely with the modern types of anchors.

Environmental Factors

Environmental factors such as weather, the strength of the currents, and water depth are some of the most common reasons for losing anchors.

Here Is A Video That Shows Exactly How Anchors Work

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When To Use A Sea Anchor?

Sea anchors and drogues are useful in maintaining boat stability during storms, controlling drift, and assisting in fishing or steering issues. It’s also crucial for facilitating quick stops, such as engine failure.

Their slowing effect on a boat can be the difference between a rough storm that is weathered successfully or not.

Over the course of my career, there have been a handful of times when deploying a sea anchor has helped my safe passage.

This article will dive into the details of when to use a sea anchor and when to use a drogue. Here are the key takeaways to remember.

1️⃣ A boat that the crew cannot keep pointing the bow-on or stern-on to heavy seas becomes unstable and will roll with breaking waves. 2️⃣ This is important because many light displacement yachts do not respond well when hove in running seas. 3️⃣ Sea anchors have saved many small yachts that have gotten into trouble in heavy seas. 4️⃣ Sea anchors are used when the boat is stopped, while drogues are used when the boat is underway but needs the speed to be kept in check.

⌚ When To Use A Sea Anchor?

A sea anchor is useful in several situations:

🟠 During Storms: It stabilizes the boat in rough weather. 🟠 To Reduce Drift: It controls the boat’s position in strong currents or winds. 🟠 While Fishing: It helps maintain a specific spot in deep water fishing. 🟠 Steering Issues: It assists in managing the boat when the steering system fails. 🟠 Emergency Stops: It aids in quick stops, such as engine failure.

The main function of a sea anchor or drogue system is to slow the boat down or keep it heading in a specific direction when conditions require. 

These devices act to provide drag, preventing the boat from swinging and slowing the boat’s forward momentum.

ing seas and will slow the vessel’s forward motion.ChatGPT

There are two main types of sea anchors:

TypeDescriptionFunction
🅰️ Sea AnchorA fabric device shaped like a parachute, deployed from the bow.Stops the boat from drifting and keeps the bow windward into the waves.
🅱️ DrogueA cone or series of cones deployed from the stern.Maintains the boat’s course in following seas and slows the vessel’s forward motion.

Both devices are designed to create drag and slow the boat’s movement.  

Sea anchors remove control from the crew. Drogues allow the crew to maintain control; the only effect is slowing the boat down.  

The events in which these devices are used include the following.

Now let’s look at all the scenarios of when to use a sea anchor in further detail. You might be interested in sea anchor sizing when it comes to these situations.

During Storms

When the captain wants to hold a position in moderate to high winds, a sea anchor or drogue will keep the vessel’s bow (sea anchor) head to the wind and waves (windward). In following seas, a drogue will slow the boat.  

A sea anchor (and drogue) is handy under these circumstances because they create drag in the opposite direction to which the current and waves run.  

To Reduce Drift

Drogues are efficient devices that slow the boat’s speed while the boat is underway. They are used in following seas, often where there is a danger of the boat speeding down big waves into the wave ahead of it.

Drogues are not designed to stop the boat, but they will keep the speed under control.

Small boats generally lose control and become involved in a life-threatening event during heavy weather because they are going too fast! 

A properly deployed drogue set at the first sign of bad weather may change the outcome.

Not only do they reduce the speed, but they also hold the stern into the waves, reducing the boat’s yawing motion.

While Fishing

If the prevailing wind pushes the boat too fast, it may prevent lighter baits or lures from reaching the bottom. It may even cause them to skip along the seafloor, making it difficult (or impossible)  for the fish to intercept and eat.

A correctly sized drogue (or series of drogues) can reduce the boat’s drift, consequently making the fishing experience much more enjoyable.

In some instances, you may want to make the boat travel sideways. An example is if you want to fish along the side of drop-offs against ridges or gutters that run 90 degrees to the current. 

A well-placed drogue mounted correctly can create sufficient conflict between the current and wind to achieve this.

If You Have Steering Issues

If you have an emergency and the steering fails (for whatever reason), sea anchors or drogues provide an excellent way to keep the boat heading stable and prevent it from turning beam on and broaching, pitchpoling, or flooding.

For Emergency Stops

If there is an emergency with the boat’s engine, a sea anchor will stop (or significantly slow) the vessel’s motion and prevent it from turning beam onto the waves. This will enable the boat to ride the rough seas more comfortably.

When you need to stop in open water that is too deep to use a ground anchor, a sea anchor offers an excellent substitute.

⚓ Types of sea anchors

There are two forms of sea anchors.

Parachute Sea Anchors

Parachute anchors are cone-shaped devices made from easily folded material. When deployed, they open up like a parachute and pull by the boat’s drift momentum.

Parachute anchors are deployed from the hull, and the drag they create (depending on their size) achieves two outcomes:

🟠 They will stop the boat (or slow it down.) 🟠 A sea anchor will keep the bow pointed windward.  

The effect of this is twofold:

1️⃣ The vessel can ride out a storm without tiring the crew.

2️⃣ Keeping the bow pointed windward removes any rolling action caused by the boat turning beam on, making it easier and more comfortable to hunker down in a heavy storm.

Drogue Sea Anchors

Drogues are devices (or a series of devices) that are deployed from the stern of the boat, and their primary function is to slow the boat down and keep the heading in line with the direction of the waves.

Drogues are very useful for controlling the boat at reduced speeds under the following conditions:

🟠 During a storm 🟠 A steering failure has occurred, and using the emergency rudder is not feasible. 🟠 During heavy following seas, when you want to keep the speed down.

🌊 How To Deploy A Sea Anchor

Don’t simply throw a sea anchor or drogue overboard. You must deploy the sea anchor properly, partly to ensure it works, but also to stay safe. 

The steps to follow are listed below.

1️⃣ Deploy the trip line and float first and ensure it drifts away from the boat.

2️⃣ In rough sea conditions, use the boat’s drift to let the rode out.

3️⃣ Carefully release the drift anchor and about 50 feet of rode (line) and snub the line (stop it from running out) with half a turn on the cleat. This will hold it until the parachute anchor opens.

4️⃣ Keep enough tension on the rode (this keeps the parachute anchor open), snubbing as necessary. Carefully play out the rest of the line.

5️⃣ If you are drift fishing and the conditions are calm, the scope (length of the line) can be shorter. Try starting with a fifteen-foot length and, if necessary, add ten-foot measurements until the tension is steady and comfortable.

6️⃣ When you are happy that it is deployed, attach the rode to a cleat (or a bridle if you are on a catamaran or trimaran)

7️⃣ Add guards to prevent the road from chafing, as necessary.

🛡️ Safety Considerations

The following basic safety precautions will help you deploy the sea anchor safely:

🟠 Practice deploying the equipment when it is calm, and you can learn without pressure.

🟠 Be sure to deploy the sea anchor before the waves rise. Trying to stand on the bow in fifty-foot waves is difficult. When you see a storm approaching, deploy it.

🟠 Ensure everyone stands clear and won’t get caught up in the rode.

For more thorough coverage of the safety considerations, read our full guide on sea anchor use .

🔑 Key Takeaways

A Sea Anchor and drogue are vital equipment that should be kept in a vessel that sails on open water.

🟠 A sea anchor will keep the boat pointing toward the waves. 🟠 A drogue slows the boat’s passage and makes it more controllable. 🟠 Before deploying “in anger,” practice placing the equipment out. 🟠 Deploy the devices in good time when you see an approaching storm. 

Sea anchors and drogues are critical life-saving appliances . Details of other safety devices can be found in our safety knowledge hub.

Written by:

Nice to e-meet you. I’m Justin, a seasoned sailing journalist and communications pro with more than 25 years of extensive industry experience. And a track record of successfully promoting teams and events on the global stage.

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7 Best Sailboat Anchors

7 Best Sailboat Anchors | Life of Sailing

Last Updated by

Daniel Wade

June 15, 2022

As long as it's the right one, your sailboat anchor is the best insurance you'll ever buy.

The right sailboat anchor will depend on the type and size of your sailboat, your planned area of sailing, and the weather conditions that you expect to encounter. So there are no shortcuts but to choose the best sailboat anchors based on these factors.

Anchoring, at its core, is all about securely fastening your sailboat using the best sailboat anchor so that it doesn't float away when the winds or tides start shifting.

And whether you're planning for a day's fishing trip to your nearest lake or going for an offshore voyage, an anchor is unquestionably essential in ensuring the safety of both you and your sailboat.

A good anchor not only gives you the much-needed peace of mind but gives you the ability to securely anchor your sailboat on a nice bay, grab a quick lunch, or explore the nearby reefs.

More importantly, you'll appreciate the importance of choosing the best sailboat anchor for your boat when you have to ride out a storm.

There are lots of excellent sailboat anchors that are a great fit for your boat. The most important is to understand what makes a high-quality anchor so that you can make an informed choice when buying the best sailboat anchor for you and your vessel. This will depend on things like the size and type of your sailboat, where you want to sail to, and the projected weather and the type of bottom of where you'll be sailing at.

Needless to say, there are a lot of sailboat anchors out there that it can be very confusing. In this article, we'll discuss how to choose the best sailboat anchor for your boat. More importantly, we've done thorough research and review the best sailboat anchors just to make the process of choosing the best sailboat anchor for you as easy as possible.

Table of contents

How to Choose the Best Sailboat Anchor

Choosing the best sailboat anchor on various things such as the type and size of your boat, the type of bottom where you're planning to anchor your boat on, the weather conditions, and many more. For example, anchoring a 24-feet sailing boat on a muddy bottom will not be the same when using the same anchor when anchoring a 49-feet sailboat on a rocky bottom. More importantly, choosing the best sailboat is all about finding the right balance in terms of the size of your boat, the type of the bottom where you're sailing at, the climate conditions, and the amount of time that you're planning to be anchored.

Here is what you need to consider.

The Size of Your Boat

The size of your boat will determine the type of anchor that's appropriate based on its weight and resistance. For example, a claw anchor can be great for boats measuring between 16 feet and 50 feet. In essence, having a bigger boat will require an anchor that is bigger and has more holding power. On the other hand, a smaller anchor with less holding power will be ideal for a smaller boat.

Your Anchoring Time

The holding power of your anchor can be affected by the amount of time you are planning to anchor your boat. If you're planning to anchor your boat for longer periods, it would make a lot of sense to have an anchor with high holding power. Differently, you can go with an anchor with less holding power if you're planning to anchor your boat for a few hours.

The Bottom Type

The shape and sharpness of an anchor will determine how good an anchor can hold your boat in different types of bottoms. For example, claw anchors can struggle in rocks and corals but work perfectly in sand and mud. On the contrary, grapnel types of anchors can work great in rocks but don't work in sand or mud. It all depends on the bottom type of the area you're planning to sail at. 

Anchor Material

The type of material used in manufacturing the anchor is of great importance in terms of its functionality, reliability, and durability. Most anchors are galvanized to prevent them from rust and also for a better price. However, stainless steel anchors offer better anchors in terms of quality and aesthetics.

Without further ado, let's jump straight in.

1. Lewmar Galvanized Delta Sailing Anchor

(Best for Larger Boats)

Although several modern types of sailboat anchors have taken the anchor industry by storm, some traditional anchor designs still hold their ground today and the Lewmar Galvanized Delta Sailing Anchor is one of them. It's designed with a single, sharply pointed wedge fluke that has a similar shape to a plow and really gets into the ground. It digs down and holds so secure for larger boats measuring over 21 feet.

This is a superb sailboat anchor that performs exceptionally well on most bottom types save for rocks. You'll love the fact that it holds extremely well in softer bottoms such as sand and mud. This anchor is made from high-grade manganese steel and is galvanized with a protective layer of zinc to prevent it from rusting. It's also more light than most anchors so stowing and transportation shouldn't be a problem.

Having been a hallmark anchor for many years, this anchor guarantees reliability and will hold excellently even in stormy conditions. Launching it is also easy thanks to its ballasted tip and streamlined shank and will set the first time thanks to its self-righting design.

  • ‍ Perfect for larger boats
  • Very durable
  • Approved by several National Lifeboat Associations
  • Comes with a perpetual guarantee against breakage
  • Easy to launch
  • Very secure
  • ‍ Quite expensive
  • Requires tripping line to release it from the seabed
  • Not great for rocky bottom

2. Rocna Vulcan Galvanized Anchor

(Best for Changing Weather Conditions)

As the best-selling sailboat anchor currently available in the market, it's easy to see why the Rocna Vulcan Galvanized Anchor is the most highly rated anchor by multiple independent reviewers. Built for strength and versatility, this anchor works great with a wide range of boats, which is a very unique feature. Coming in sizes ranging from 9 to 606 pounds, this anchor is so versatile and gives you the option of choosing the right size for your sailboat.

This remains the most dependable anchor in the market, especially in the roughest of conditions. It holds all types of the seabed so fast and has a roll bar that's crucial in ensuring that your boat's weight is not only distributed appropriately but the boat sets at the right angle. Its Vulcan design and sharp tip allow it to snug fit on the bow and to get right into the seabed respectively.

This is an anchor that draws the best features from traditional sailboat anchors such as spade and bagel anchors to become one of the best modern sailboat anchors out there.

  • ‍ Perfect for stormy conditions
  • Great for all types of seabed
  • Very versatile and available in a wide range of sizes
  • Perfect for all types of boats
  • It has an easy storage design
  • It's designed by a well-known brand
  • ‍ Very expensive
  • ‍ Its shank is only perfect for  bigger flukes

3. Manson Galvanized Supreme Sailing Anchor

(The Fastest Setting and Highest Holding Anchor)

If you're looking to purchase the best sailboat anchor from a well-established brand, look no further than the Manson Galvanized Supreme Sailing Anchor. This anchor has been in the market for the better part of the last two decades and still holds its ground as one of the best sailboat anchors out there. The fact that it is perfect for all types of seabed makes it a great option for sailors who are on a budget.

This sailboat anchor has an indisputable reputation all over the world as the fastest setting and highest holding anchor. This is because it's uniquely designed for extreme holding conditions thanks to its standard bow rollers and a dual operation shank that's designed with the utmost versatility in mind. Whether you're looking to anchor in mud, sand, or rocky areas, this anchor will never disappoint you.

  • ‍ It has an extremely high holding power
  • It's the fastest setting anchor in the market
  • It's perfect for all types of seabed including rocky areas
  • Its safety is guaranteed as it has passed multiple tests
  • It's very durable
  • Designed for extreme weather conditions
  • ‍ It's heavy, which can bring difficulties in stowing and transportation
  • Very expensive

4. Danforth S-600 Standard Sailing Anchor

(Best for Smaller Boats)

At this point, you shouldn't have any doubt that some of the more traditional types of anchors still have a place in the anchor industry today. The Danforth S-600 Standard Sailing Anchor is a traditional fluke anchor that's extremely perfect for smaller boats but can also be used as a secondary anchor for larger boats. Having been developed in the US back in the 1940s, this type of anchor is similar to the modern CQR anchor and doesn't compromise on quality and reliability even in rough weather conditions.

It's lighter than most anchors, so stowing or transporting it shouldn't be a problem. In terms of its holding power, it has an excellent power-to-weight ratio and can hold quite fast in sand and mud. The fact that it is a fluke type of anchor makes it not perfect for coral, rock, or gravel bottoms.

  • ‍ Perfect for smaller boats
  • It's good for sandy and muddy substrates
  • Lightweight and compact
  • Has a holding power of about 600 pounds
  • Constructed with high-strength galvanized steel
  • Quite affordable 
  • ‍ Not ideal for rock, coral, or gravel substrates
  • Can only be used as a secondary anchor on larger boats (over 27 feet)
  • It has moving parts

5. Lewmar Claw Anchor

(Best for All Types of Seabed)

If you're looking for the best sailboat anchor that will serve you perfectly in all types of substrates, the Lewmar Claw Anchor can be an ideal choice. Previously known as the Bruce or Claw type anchor, this anchor has a three-pronged design that enables it to easily set in any bottom. It doesn't matter whether you want to anchor in an area with mud, sand, rock, coral, gravel, or grassy bottom, this anchor will hold its ground.

It can be a great option if you're on a tight budget and want to buy an anchor that doesn't have a complete design while going about its duty quietly. It's so versatile thanks to the fact that it's available in sizes ranging from 4.4 pounds to 44 pounds. What's more; it's made from high-grade steel and it's very durable. If anything, it draws inspiration from the anchors used in securing oil rigs in the North Sea. 

  • ‍ Excellent for all types of substrates
  • It's very versatile
  • It's durable
  • It's very affordable
  • ‍ Its odd shape makes it difficult to stow

6. Mantus Galvanized Sailing Anchor

(Perfect for Dense Grassy Bottoms)

The level of functionality that the Mantus Galvanized Sailing Anchor brings to the table is unmatched. This is an anchor that offers unparalleled holding power as it can dig a lot deeper than most anchors out there.

It's strongly built but can come apart to make it a lot easy to store and transport. Its sharp-headed nose gives it maximum penetration power, though it may not hold quite well in low viscosity sea beds. This anchor is highly dependable yet very expensive so it might not be an ideal option if you're on a budget. So if functionality is your top priority when going to an area with dense grassy bottoms, it can be your ideal option. 

  • ‍ Very functional and dependable
  • Perfect for dense grassy bottoms
  • Easy to store and transport
  • Made from high-quality steel
  • Comes with a lifetime warranty against breakage
  • ‍ It has moving parts
  • It's very expensive

7. Norestar Stainless Steel Delta/Wing Boat Sailing Anchor

(Highest Quality Anchor)

One of the most important things when in the market for a good sailboat anchor is quality. Well, the Norestar doesn't disappoint on this front as it's manufactured using the highest quality stainless steel. This stainless steel is strengthened with micron thick PVD coating that gives it a highly urbane appearance.

Its design is also one of the most popular anchoring systems in the maritime industry today. This is because it offers impeccable security and gives you the peace of mind knowing that your boat is safe at all times.

  • ‍ It is self-launching
  • Made from the highest quality stainless steel
  • It sets easily
  • Perfect for most bottoms
  • It's lightweight and has no moving parts
  • ‍ Not ideal for bottoms with hard sand
  • Quite expensive

There you have it; these are the best sailboat anchors in the market. An anchor is one of the most crucial parts of safe sailing. Whether you're looking to moor at the harbor or to explore far-reaching areas in the water, a good anchor is your number safety and insurance while on the water.

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I've personally had thousands of questions about sailing and sailboats over the years. As I learn and experience sailing, and the community, I share the answers that work and make sense to me, here on Life of Sailing.

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Practical Boat Owner

  • Digital edition

Practical Boat Owner cover

Which drogue should you buy? 7 drogues on test

  • Ben Meakins
  • December 15, 2015

When your boat’s being battered by a storm and you want to ride things out, a drogue will make things more comfortable. But which one should you buy? We tested 7 to find out...

sailboat sea anchor

Of all the safety kit we’re told is essential to ensure our safety at sea, a drogue is fairly low on most people’s lists, especially if they only sail in sight of land or in coastal hops. But drogues have many uses aboard, and could help you ride out a storm, enter a harbour safely, steer after the loss of a rudder or keep you safe under tow. They could, then, save your boat and your life. With many models available, we put seven to the test.

Drogue vs sea anchor?

Drogues and sea anchors are often lumped together as one and the same – in some cases by their manufacturers – but there is a difference in function. In appearance, they are similar, but they perform very different roles.

Sea anchors are designed to stop and ‘moor’ a boat bow-to the waves. They are used to ride out a storm, or to heave-to and take a rest. Drogues, or speed-limiting drogues as they are sometimes called, are used to keep a boat stern-to the waves. Unlike sea anchors they are not designed to stop the boat in the water, but instead to slow her down while keeping her from broaching beam-on to the waves. Sea anchors tend to be much bigger and must be deployed on a much longer and stretchier line.

There are also design factors at play. A sea anchor is relatively static in the water, whereas a drogue is designed to be towed at speed. That makes the design of a drogue important as it must produce less drag than a sea anchor, and yet be stable and resist any attempt to spin, slew or ‘porpoise’. An acknowledged authority on the subject is Victor Shane’s Drag Device Data Dase: using parachutes, sea anchors and drogues to cope with heavy weather. It lists the attributes that make a good drogue: ‘It must pursue a straight course, must track straight, must be faithful in retaining its shape. The standard for sizing is that a yacht should average 3-6 knots with a speed-limiting drogue in tow.’

Manufacturers address this in a number of ways, either by adding vents to the side or incorporating swivels to allow it to rotate safely.

7 of the best drogues available right now

Plastimo sea anchor (drogue) review.

IMG_7175_cmyk

Plastimo sea anchor / drogue review

  • RRP: £59.95 
  • Diameter: 60cm • Length: 120cm

Plastimo’s offering is called a Sea Anchor, but its small size makes it much more suitable as a drogue. It’s made of vinyl in a cone shape, with a wire ‘hoop’ sewn into the open mouth to give it shape.

It deployed to its correct shape instantly at 3.5 knots, reducing the boat speed to 1.8 knots and putting a strain of 30kg on the line. At 7 knots, it reduced the boat speed to 4.3 knots, with the line strain increasing to 90kg.

plastimo

Plastimo sea anchor/drogue review – view from the stern of the boat with product in action

It stayed well submerged, and didn’t break the surface. It tracked straight but had a tendency to rise and fall in the water. The addition of a length of chain helped to keep it lower in the water and improved this problem.

Recovery was relatively simple, although it took some time for the water to drain from the narrow exit. A tripline rigged from the point of the cone would make it easier to recover.

Buy it now from Amazon

Note: We may earn a commission when you buy through links on our site, at no extra cost to you. This doesn’t affect our editorial independence.

Lalizas professional drogue review.

IMG_7241_cmyk

  • RRP: £65.99 
  • Diameter: 1.4m • Length: 1.65m

The Lalizas drogue is available in a number of sizes: we chose the smallest. However, with a 2m-wide mouth and measuring 1.65m long, it was enormous compared to the other drogues on test.

It gave us the highest readings of any we tested: When deployed at 3.5 knots it took 15 seconds to assume its shape, due to its size and the lack of wire to keep the mouth open.

TSKJ7850

The Lalizas Professional drogue was enormous compared to the others on test

But once it assumed the correct shape it stopped us completely, taking our 3.5 knots to nothing in seconds, which exerted 120kg on the line.

At higher revs, it took us from 7 knots to 1.7 knots, putting a strain of 150kg on the line. At these high loads it sat very near the surface, but didn’t porpoise or snake around.

lalizas

At high loads it sat near the surface, but didn’t snake around

This would be better suited as a sea anchor, the purpose of which is to stop the vessel, rather than a speed-limiting drogue, which should keep the vessel under controlled lower speed.

Recovery was hard work, but was made simpler if the drogue was capsized while pulling it onboard. A tripline, rigged to the loop at the narrow end of the cone, would make recovery much easier.

Oceanbrake Series Drogue review

IMG_7336_cmyk

Oceanbrake series drogue review

  • Diameter: 15cm • Length: 60m

This series drogue had 75 small cones on 60m of line, and a heavy loop of chain at the aft end. Oceanbrake say this is suitable for vessels of light displacement – 100 cones would normally be recommended. Nonetheless, it was very effective.

Deployment was simply a case of paying out the line, and it was much easier than the single drogues as the strain increased gradually, with none of the violent snatching experienced with the single-cone drogues.

Streamed astern in our engine tests, it reduced our speed from 3.5 knots to 2.1 knots, with the line experiencing 24kg strain. At higher revs, our speed was reduced from 7 knots to 4.9 knots at 104kg strain.

Recovery was easier than with a single-element drogue

Recovery of the Oceanbrake series drogue was easier than with a single-element drogue

In the waves, we found the Series Drogue to be easy to deploy and to recover, and to be very controlled. There was no porpoising or snaking around, and the load increased in a gradual, controlled fashion. As a wave rolled under the boat, it kept a steady pressure on the line, keeping the stern to the waves, and the heavy chain and series of cones kept the pressure constant.

Recovery was easier than with single-element drogues: there was no need to collapse the multiple drogues and hauling in got easier as the line in the water got shorter. Its bulk and weight would be a lot to stow on a small boat, however.

Buy it now on oceanbrake.com

Para-Tech Delta Drogue review

IMG_7260_cmyk

Para-tech delta drogue review – deployed underwater

  • RRP: $199 (£118)
  • Diameter: 65cm • Length 47cm

Designed so that it cannot turn inside out, the Delta drogue is made from vinyl-coated nylon, and has a design akin to a tricorne hat. It is supplied with a meaty stainless swivel. Ours was a 36in model.

delta

View from the stern of the boat – the Para-tech delta drogue occasionally broke the surface in use

It reduced our speed from 3.5 knots to 2.2 knots at low revs, exerting 20kg on the line. At higher revs, it reduced our speed from 7 knots to 4.9 knots, exerting 80kg.

It broke the surface occasionally at higher speeds, but the addition of a short length of chain between the line and swivel kept it below the surface and made it much more controllable. We found it ideal as a steering aid. Recovery was simple thanks to the small size of the drogue.

Buy it now from seaanchor.com

Seabrake review

IMG_7209_cmyk

Seabrake review – deployed underwater

  • Diameter: 62cm • Length 80cm

The Seabrake, made in Australia and sold in the UK by Emsworth-based Sea Teach (now Ocean Chandlery ), comprises two parts – a cone and a body, with a vent between them.

It reduced the boat speed from 3.5 knots to 1.9 knots, with a strain of 32kg on the line. At higher speeds, it reduced the boat speed from 7 knots to 3.9 knots, exerting a 110kg force on the line.

sea-brake

The supplied length of chain kept the Seabrake well below the surface

Sea Teach supplied it with a 2m length of heavy galvanised chain, which kept it well below the surface and out of sight. Without the chain, the speeds and loads were unchanged, but it was visible, although it never broke the surface and was controlled and tracked straight. Recovery was simple, but a tripline would help collapse the cone to aid hauling on board.

Sea Teach also supplied a line and chain, ready-flaked into a mesh bag that was ready for deployment: a foam hoop kept the mouth open, which made both deployment and recovery easy with a crew member flaking the line into the bag.

Buy it now from eBay

Ocean Safety Para Drogue review – BEST ON TEST

IMG_7300_cmyk

Para Drogue review – PBO best on test – drogue deployed beneath the surface

  • Diameter: 65cm • Length 60cm

The Para Drogue, made in Southampton by Ocean Safety, comprises two linked parts; an open-ended cone and an adjustable ‘mouth’. It deployed to its correct shape immediately, slowing the boat from 3.5 knots to 1.7 knots and experiencing a line load of 34kg.

The Para Drogue stayed submerged, with no porpoising and very little yawing

The Para Drogue stayed submerged, with no porpoising and very little yawing

At 7 knots, it reduced the boat’s speed to 3.5 knots with a line strain of 120kg. It stayed submerged, with no porpoising and very little yawing.

It’s well constructed, and its shape meant that it was easy to recover as the water drained out very quickly. It stows in a small, neat pouch. No tripline is required as recovery is simple.

Buy it now from oceansafety.com

Jimmy Green Yacht Drogue review – BEST BUDGET BUY

  • Diameter: 54cm • Length 80cm

Jimmy Green, based in Beer in Devon, make a number of sizes of drogue – this one was a size 10, suitable for the 29ft Mohraina .

It comprises a PVC cone and at low revs reduced our speed from 3.5 knots to 2 knots, exerting 28kg on the line.

Flat out, it reduced the boat speed from 7 knots to 4.5 knots, exerting 100kg on the line.

A short length of chain helped to keep the Jimmy Green drogue submerged

A short length of chain helped to keep the Jimmy Green drogue submerged

It set immediately on immersion despite the lack of any stiffening to hold the mouth of the cone open, and behaved well underwater, with no spinning, slewing or porpoising.

A short length of chain helped keep it well submerged. It was simple to recover, and a tripline will help to collapse the drogue on recovery.

Buy it now from jimmygreen.co.uk

PBO Drogue test results

We were unable to test these drogues in extremis, but gathered some useful data from our test. It was reassuring that none of the drogues experienced problems at high speed: while some slewed around underwater, none of them broke the surface.

The Series Drogue was by far the easiest to handle, and would be extremely useful if heading off on a long trip in open water, where its ease of use and reputation in large waves would earn it a place in the lazarette despite its bulk relative to the others on test.

For the average coastal sailor, a single-element drogue is likely to be more use. Of these, the Para Drogue was well made, gave the most drag and came in a usefully-sized package. The Seabrake GP24 performed almost as well, for much less money. At the budget end, the Jimmy Green Marine Yacht Drogue 10 was a worthy performer at low cost.

Screen Shot 2015-12-15 at 16.26.36

7 drogues compared: percentage speed reduction at high speed and at low speed

Screen Shot 2015-12-15 at 16.26.42

7 drogues compared: Drag in KG at low speed and at high speed

Screen Shot 2015-12-15 at 16.26.48

7 drogues compared: all specifications in one view

Types of drogue and uses for a drogue

There are two main types of drogue – standard single-element cone-shaped drogues and their variations, and series drogues.

Single-element drogue

These come in many shapes and sizes, as we found out. Some solid plastic and metal drogues are available, but we were unable to obtain one in time for our trials.

Far more common are the fabric-types, which come in a range of sizes. Some are simply scaled-down sea anchors, but other drogues have a vent system or secondary body to keep them under control as they are dragged through the water.

Series drogue

Developed by the late Don Jordan, the series drogue comprises a long warp with upwards of 100 mini cones attached and a weight on the end. The warp is long enough to span two wave-lengths and the series of cones provides not only a backup and failsafe, but is also far less likely to pull out of the front of a wave, while the weight will keep the whole structure from snatching.

Using a drogue as emergency steering device

J-Fever-drogue-in-actioncmyk_cmyk

J-109 J-Fever arriving safely into Cherbourg without a rudder thanks to deploying and steering with a drogue

Many drogues are kept aboard as an emergency steering device. We looked at how to do this in an earlier feature . This photo shows how a J/109 made it into Cherbourg under sail after her rudder broke in 2010.

Using a drogue to stop surfing

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A drogue to help navigate bars and narrow entrances

narrow-harbour_cmyk

A drogue to help control a boat under tow

tow_cmyk

7 drogues tested: how we did it

We borrowed a Contest 29, Mohraina , moored at Poole’s East Dorset Sailing Club and owned by Dick Hanraads. We headed out of Poole Harbour with our seven drogues aboard. A test in extreme conditions was not possible, but a comparative test of each drogue’s holding and slowing power is a useful exercise. For our controlled tests, we deployed each drogue on a 40m length of line, and recorded the boat’s speed at two sets of engine revolutions that had given us 3.5 knots and 7 knots of boat speed respectively. This meant that, initially, the boat was travelling at around 3.5 knots as the drogue was deployed, to simulate the likely speed that you’d deploy the drogue in reality. We looked at the time it took to reach its correct shape and deploy. We also measured the drag force of each drogue using a 100kg spring balance in one side of a 2:1 purchase. The figure, doubled, would then give us the strain on the line.

IMG_7324

From a RIB, we monitored the behaviour of the drogue, checking that it pursued a straight course and that it remained below the surface – no problem in our flat water conditions, but a big problem in waves. We then examined how easy it was to retrieve each drogue.

TSKJ7393

Finally we headed round Old Harry Rocks to sit in the overfalls off Handfast Point. There was a brisk south-westerly, blowing around 15 knots, which gave use some wave conditions to play with, and we tried steering with the drogues as well as handling them in rougher water and seeing how the boat responded.

Streaming warps vs drogue – which is best?

Read classic Hiscock, Chichester, Knox-Johnston or the Smeetons and you’ll not have long to wait before reaching tales of warp streaming. Streaming warps we tried to use the same test methods as for the drogues, but registered low readings of 4kg strain with 0.1 knot difference for a 40m warp streamed astern, and 8kg and 0.3 knots respectively for the same warp streamed in a bight. If you don’t have a drogue this is worth trying, and might keep your stern to the waves enough to make things more comfortable, but it will have nowhere near the same level of drag as a dedicated drogue.

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The 5 Best Sailboat Anchors

Paul Stockdale Avatar

A good anchor for a sailboat will help keep a vessel stationary and stable in the water in any weather conditions or marine environment.

There are a number of top anchors for sailing boats that can work on sailboats of both small and large sizes of under 20ft to over 100ft.

The best sailboat anchors are:

  • Best Overall : Mantus Marine M1 Mantus Anchor
  • Best For Holding Boat : Lewmar Claw Anchor
  • Best For Price : Seachoice Utility Anchor
  • Best For Small Sailboats : Fortress FX-11 Anchor
  • Best For Large Sailboats : Rocna Galvanized Anchor

These anchors will ensure the sailboat is anchoring properly in any sailing conditions.

Sailboat owners should choose an anchor based on the size and type of their sailboat as well as the type of marine environment their vessel will be located in.

For example, anchoring a sailboat on a sandy surface is different than anchoring a sailboat on a rocky surface and it will require different anchors.

1. M1 Mantus Galvanized Anchor

M1 Mantus Galvanized Anchor Best Overall Anchor

The best overall sailboat anchor is the M1 Mantus anchor manufactured by the brand Mantus Marine in Texas, America and sold worldwide.

This fluke anchor is the best overall anchor because it can dig deep into the seafloor and ensure the sailing vessel will not float away.

The M1 Mantus anchor is constructed of hot-dipped galvanized steel with the shank and shank boot welded from top to bottom.

It is a plow anchor shaped with a sharp triangle-shaped nose, a straight shank and a "U" shaped roll bar bolted to a fluke.

This anchor comes in many different sizes from 8lbs to 175lbs. It comes with 4 American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) certified bolts.

The M1 Mantus anchor is used on seafloor surfaces including sandy, gravel, grassy and muddy sea floors. It is not used on rocky sea floors.

The M1 Mantus can be used in different types of locations including rivers, sea and lakes.

Sailboat sizes of 20ft to 65ft can use the M1 Mantus anchor.

The M1 Mantus anchor is priced between $180 for the smallest 8lb anchor to approximately $3,000 for the largest 175lb anchor at most retailers.

The M1 Mantus anchor works to hold a vessel in position in winds of up to 40 knots, highlighting its great holding power abilities.

The benefits of the M1 Mantus anchor are:

  • It comes with a great lifetime warranty : The Mantus Marine manufacturer offers a lifetime warranty on this anchor for added peace of mind
  • It can be disassembled easily for storage : Simple disassembling bolts make it easy for storing this anchor when it is not in use
  • Multiple size options : With anchor size options from 8lbs to 175lbs, sailboat owners of different vessel sizes, from small sailboats of 20ft to large sailboats of 65ft can use this anchor
  • It works in multiple marine conditions : This anchor works in multiple marine conditions from calm ocean currents to extremely windy and storm conditions with up to 40 knots of wind speed
  • High-performance sharp head nose enables easy penetration of the sea floor : The sharp edge nose of this anchor means it penetrates the ocean floor fast and with ease
  • It is hot dipped galvanized for corrosion prevention : This anchor is hot dipped galvanized giving it extra protection against corrosion and wear from corrosive seawater
  • It comes with 4 high-quality oversized A.S.T.M. certified bolts : This anchor comes with 4 oversized bolts with a large margin of safety that will help prevent damage

One disadvantage of the M1 Mantus anchor is it is more expensive than other anchors on the market.

M1 Mantas Anchor On Amazon →

M1 Mantas Anchor On eBay →

2. Lewmar Claw Anchor

Lewmar Claw Anchor Best Holding Power Anchor

The best sailboat anchor for its holding power is the Lewmar Claw anchor manufactured by the brand Lewmar in Hampshire, United Kingdom and sold worldwide.

The Lewmar Claw anchor is constructed of high-grade galvanized steel cast in a single piece. This anchor was inspired and designed based on anchors used to secure oil rigs in the North Sea.

The Lewmar Claw anchor comes in sizes from 2.2lbs to 176lbs. It is used on seabed surfaces including sandy, muddy, gravel and grassy ocean floors. It is not used on rocky surfaces.

The Lewmar Claw anchor can be used in different types of marine locations including ocean, lake and river floors.

Sailboat sizes of 12ft to 65ft can use the Lewmar Claw anchor.

The Lewmar Claw anchor is priced between approximately $30 for the smallest 2.2lb anchor to approximately $1,300 for the largest 176lb anchor at most retailers.

The Lewmar Claw anchor can hold a sailing vessel in position in winds up to 50 knots without the boat floating away.

The benefits of the Lewmar Claw anchor are:

  • It's fast setting : Depending on the sea depth, this anchor can set and begin anchoring a vessel in under 5 minutes
  • It has great holding power : This anchor can help with anchoring boats in position in extremely harsh weather conditions with winds up to 50 knots
  • Easy bow roller storable : This anchor can fit and store nicely in most bow roller shapes and styles without any issues
  • It's a budget-friendly anchor : The Lewmar Claw anchor is one of the cheapest on the market and it should be within most sailboat owner's budget with the most expensive anchor sold at a price of approximately $1,300
  • It's built with strong & high-quality material : The Lewmar Claw is built with high-quality and heat-treated steel with a galvanized finish

One disadvantage of the Lewmar Claw anchor is it does not come with a lifetime warranty.

Lewmar Claw Anchor On Amazon →

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3. Seachoice Utility Anchor

Seachoice Utility Anchor Best For Price

The best sailboat anchor for the price is the Seachoice Utility anchor manufactured by the brand Seachoice in Florida, America and sold worldwide.

This fluke anchor is the best for the price because it offers the most options for the cheapest price on the market.

The Seachoice Utility anchor is constructed of hot-dipped galvanized steel or PVC-coated steel. It comes in 5 different color options including red, black, white, light blue and grey.

This anchor comes in different sizes from 4.5lbs to 8.5lbs.

The Seachoice Utility anchor is priced at approximately $25 for the smallest 4.5lb anchor to approximately $70 for the larger 8.5lb anchor at most retailers.

The Seachoice Utility anchor is used on different seabed surfaces including gravel, sand, grassy and muddy sea floors. It is not used on rocky seafloors.

The Seachoice anchor can be used in different types of marine locations including the sea, rivers and lakes.

Sailboat sizes of 10ft to 30ft can use the Seachoice Utility anchor.

The Seachoice Utility anchor can hold a sailboat in position and keep it anchored in wind speeds up to 30 knots without the boat floating away.

The benefits of the Seachoice Utility anchor are:

  • It comes with a 1-year warranty : The Seachoice Utility anchor comes with a 1-year manufacturers warranty for added peace of mind
  • It comes in multiple color options : Sailboat owners can choose from 5 different anchor colors
  • It's easy to retrieve from the seawater : This anchor comes with a great slip-ring design that makes it easy to retrieve it from the water after use
  • Sharp anchor fluke design makes penetration easy : The sharp fluke design helps the anchor to easily penetrate the seafloor surface
  • It is cheap : The Seachoice Utility anchor is the cheapest anchor on the market with the largest anchor priced at approximately $70

Two disadvantages of the Seachoice Utility anchor are the anchor can only be used on smaller sailboats up to 30ft in length and it can not be used on larger sailboats over 30ft and the anchor can not be used on rocky sea floors.

Seachoice Utility Anchor On Amazon →

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4. Fortress FX-11 Anchor

Fortress FX-11 Anchor Best For Small Sailboats

The best sailboat anchor for small sailboats is the Fortress FX-11 anchor manufactured by the brand Fortress Marine Anchors in Florida, America and sold worldwide.

This fluke anchor is the best for small boats because its lightweight aluminum material is capable of holding a sailboat up to 32ft without the anchor being extra heavy.

The Fortress FX-11 anchor is constructed of aluminum alloy material and it comes in a size of 7lbs.

It comes with a pivot adjustment which allows an adjustment of the anchor angle between 32° to 45°.

The Fortress FX-11 anchor is used on seafloor surfaces including sand, gravel, mud and grassy surfaces. It is not used on rocky seafloor surfaces.

The Fortress FX-11 anchor can be used in different marine locations including lakes, rivers and the sea.

Sailboat sizes of between 28ft to 32ft can use the FX-11 anchor.

The Fortress FX-11 anchor is priced at approximately $200 at most retailers.

The Fortress FX-11 anchor works to hold a sailing vessel in position in winds up to 30 knots without the vessel floating away.

The benefits of the Fortress FX-11 anchor are:

  • It's rustproof : The light but strong aluminum material is rustproof meaning the anchor will not suffer from rusting caused by the corrosive seawater
  • It comes with a lifetime parts warranty : The Fortress FX-11 anchor comes with a lifetime parts replacement warranty against damage that might occur to any parts of the anchor
  • It is easy to store after use : It can be easily disassembled which means it is easy to store onboard the sailboat after using it#
  • Penetrates the seafloor and sets deeper : The sharp edge d anchor allows it to easily penetrate seafloors and anchor a boat

One disadvantage of the Fortress FX-11 anchor is it can only be used on smaller sailboats between 28ft to 32ft and it cannot be used on larger sailing vessels over 32ft.

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5. Rocna Galvanized Anchor

Rocna Galvanized Anchor Best For Large Sailboats

The best anchor for larger sailboats is the Rocna galvanized steel anchor manufactured by the brand Rocna in British Columbia, Canada and sold worldwide.

The Rocna anchor is constructed of galvanized steel with solid welding from top to bottom.

The Rocna galvanized steel anchor was designed by New Zealand sailor Peter Smith.

The Rocna anchor design comes with a roll-bar to ensure the anchor can penetrate the surface at the best angle and one-third of the anchor's weight is on the fluke tip which also helps with the penetration of the seafloor surface.

The Rocna anchor comes in 14 different sizes from 9lbs to 606lbs.

This fluke anchor is the best for larger sailboats because it offers anchors up to 606lbs which will help with anchoring most larger sailing vessels.

The Rocna anchor can be used on all sea surfaces from gravel, mud, sand, clay, kelp and rocks. It can also be used in marine locations including lakes, rivers and the sea.

Sailboat sizes of 12ft to over 300ft can use the Rocna galvanized steel anchor.

The Rocna galvanized steel anchor is priced between approximately $220 for the smallest 9lbs anchor to approximately $12,000 for the largest 606lb anchor.

The Rocna galvanized steel anchor can hold a sailing vessel in position in winds up to 40 knots without the boat floating away.

The benefits of the Rocna galvanized anchor are:

  • It comes with a great lifetime warranty : The Rocna galvanized anchor comes with a lifetime warranty against breakage, manufacturing defects and bending for added peace of mind
  • It can be used on all sea surfaces : The Rocna galvanized steel anchor can be used on all sea surfaces including gravel, sand, mud and rocky sea floors and it is not limited or restricted to just a few types of surfaces
  • It sets fast : The sharp edge fluke helps penetrate the sea surface and the anchor sets fast as a result of this design

One disadvantage of the Rocna anchor is it is not the cheapest anchor with the cheapest price at approximately $220.

Rocna Anchor On Amazon →

Top Sailboat Anchors Comparison Table

Anchor Price Best For Anchor Sizes Sailboat Size Construction Holding Power Warranty
$180 - $3,000 Design, Ease of use 8lbs - 175lbs 20ft - 65ft Hot-Dipped Galvanized Steel 40 Knots Lifetime Warranty
$30 - $1,300 Holding Power 2.2lbs - 176lbs 12ft - 65ft Galvanized Steel 50 Knots No Warranty
$25 - $70 Price 4.5lbs - 8.5lbs 10ft - 30ft Hot-Dipped Galvanized Steel 30 Knots 1 Year Warranty
$200 Small Sailboats 7lbs 28ft - 32ft Aluminum Alloy 30 Knots Lifetime Warranty
$220 - $12,000 Large Sailboats 9lbs - 606lbs 12ft - 300ft Galvanized Steel 40 Knots Lifetime Warranty

What To Consider When Buying A Sailboat Anchor

The factors to consider before buying a sailboat anchor are:

  • Type of material used : The type of material used to create the anchor is an important consideration when buying a sailboat anchor. Most modern anchors are constructed using aluminum steel or galvanized steel
  • Durability : How long the anchor can last is a factor to consider when buying a sailboat anchor. Modern anchors come with lifetime warranties and they should last for well over 10 years
  • Size Of The Boat : Identifying the proper anchor size for a boat is not a perfect science but the size of your boat is an extremely important factor to consider when choosing a top sailboat anchor. Typically, the larger the boat size, the bigger the anchor that is required
  • Price : Price will also play a big role in the sailboat anchor you buy. Anchors come in many different prices for many different budgets

Frequently Asked Questions About The Best Sailboat Anchors

Below are the most common and frequently asked questions about the top sailing vessel anchors.

What Are The Best Sailboat Anchor Brands?

The best sailboat anchor brands are:

  • Five Oceans Danforth Style
  • Mantus Marine

Are Top Sailing Boat Anchors Expensive?

No, top sailboat anchors are not expensive with some of the best sailboat anchors priced as little as $25 in some instances.

What Are The Different Types Of Sailboat Anchors Available For Sailboat Owners?

The types of sailboat anchors available are:

  • Fluke anchors
  • Plow anchors
  • Claw anchors
  • Mushroom anchors
  • Grapnel anchors

Boat Anchoring Techniques Explained (Illustrated Guide)

The basics of anchoring in calm conditions in an anchorage with good holding aren't difficult to master, and you should start with basic anchoring techniques if you haven't read it already and practiced setting your hook.

This article is for when anchoring isn't so easy, but you still have to stop your boat and stay secure. There are several approaches you can take for anchoring in tricky bottoms, bad weather, or in other special situations where conditions are less than ideal.

Your tools are skills and equipment, and a little advance preparation can give you a lot of options.

sailboat sea anchor

On this page:

Solve difficult bottoms with different anchors, dealing with tough anchoring conditions, other situations that may prove difficult, special gear (how & why to use it).

We can solve most challenging bottoms with a different choice of anchor, but that's not always an option since you can't stock your bow locker with every type of anchor on the market. Most sailors have two anchors - a primary all around anchor, and a backup. When choosing your backup anchor, make sure it's different from your primary, since two anchors of the same type don't buy you anything with varying bottom conditions.

With most tricky bottoms, more scope is always better than less. So if your anchorage has the swing space, add an extra helping of rope or chain when you set.

Most difficult bottom: rocks

Rocky bottoms and solid rock are probably the most difficult anchoring, since it's nearly impossible for an anchor to cut into the bottom and set. Solid rock is trickier than a rock strewn bottom, and nearly impossible to get a good holding without a lot of weight. A spade or plow can find something to dig into with a rocky bottom, but not much can hold on solid rock.

Fisherman's anchor

The fisherman's anchor is a good choice for rocky bottoms, since it relies more on weight and catching than on digging in like fluke and spade anchors. Mushroom anchors can work, but both mushroom and fisherman's anchors must be heavy to hold, since the weight of the anchor has to do a lot of the work.

On-shore anchors

As an alternative to anchoring, consider using things on shore like trees and other fixtures with a deep water stern anchor. If you can get a stern anchor to set outside the rocks, you can run a line to shore and keep your boat in place.

Use a trip line instead

And if you know you're anchoring in rocks, consider using a trip line. Or if you have a slotted anchor shank, like you'll find on a Rocna, Manson, or other modern anchor, be sure to move the shackle there before you drop anchor - it will help you recover it and decrease your chances of getting stuck fast.

Anchors don't dig in in soft silt

Anchors tend to just sink into silt and soft mud, then drag through without digging in when you try to set them. Thick silt isn't much thicker than water at the top of it, and your anchor has nothing to catch. Anchoring in a really soft bottom requires patience, since your best technique is to let the anchor settle into the soft mud before you try to set.

Drop your anchor in the selected spot, but when you get some scope out, let it sit for a while. A long while - in some places it can take fifteen to thirty minutes for your anchor to sink through the ooze to reach med think enough to catch.

Once you're gotten your anchor nestled into the silt, try setting it gently. Idling back on it in reverse should help it catch in the thicker mud under the soft stuff. Avoid a final "hard set" with this bottom type unless you're expecting some wind.

Avoid false sets in weeds and grass

Like rock bottoms, your best choice for a weedy bottom is an anchor which works well in weeds. Some anchors can not cut through the tough mat of roots and fiber under a weed bed, or have flukes which tangle in the vegetation instead of digging in.

Roll bar anchors will work

Modern roll bar anchors do pretty well in weeds and grass, but some plow and fluke anchors can be quite difficult to set. If your primary anchor is a CQR, fluke, or other anchor known to fare poorly in grass and weeds, try another anchor if you have one.

One caution - even the best anchors for grass and weeds may "false set" on you. They can catch on the grass and weeds and feel like they've caught bottom, but if they load up or the wind shifts, you may have troubles. Take extra care to back down hard to make sure your anchor is dug into the bottom.

Avoid coral heads if you can

Coral heads or "bommies" are in tropical anchorages all over the world, and some remote atolls give you no choice but to anchor near or among them. Anchoring badly among bommies can cause a mess - your anchor chain will get snaked and wrapped through and around the coral heads. Not only is this hard to get out of, but it is terrible for the coral and you should avoid it.

Set up floats

The first thing to look for around coral heads is a large patch of clear sand to drop your anchor. It may be tough to find, but you don't want to drop your anchor on top of hard coral. You won't be likely to find enough open sand for your whole swing range, so you'll need to rig up some floats to keep your chain out of the coral.

Your goal is to get the last 1/3 of the chain to hold you on the bottom, but use your string of three or more fenders to keep the rest of the chain suspended in the water above the coral heads. Your fenders will almost completely sink while you do this, but they will keep the chain from getting tangled.

Start by making your initial drop on that patch of clear sand and let up from one third to one half your expected rode out. Then tie a fender to the chain with a stout line and let out another 1/3 of the remaining rode. Tie on another fender, and let out another 1/3 of the remaining rode. Tie on a third fender, and let out the remaining rode and snub it.

Anything which reduces visibility and hearing, adds shifting forces on the boat, or increases the loads on your anchor will add a challenge to your successful anchoring. If you plan and practice, you can get through it and get a good set.

Communication is key when you have someone on the bow and someone on the helm, and well-practiced hand signals are a must. Headsets can help, but if you use them, make sure you have hand signals to back them up.

Prepare in case of heavy weather

Anchoring in bad weather is fraught with difficulty. Driving rain cuts visibility, howling winds can make communication near impossible even with headsets, and heavy wind will drive you out of position quickly as you try to get the anchor down to the bottom.

The best first step to anchoring in bad weather is to talk your plan out ahead of time. You may have trouble communicating with the person on the bow, so if everyone on board knows the plan for anchoring, you'll do better if you can't hear each other or see hand signals. Heavy weather anchoring cuts across a lot of the tough conditions in our list, but if you're trying to escape a bad weather system, you may have little choice but to deal with it once you've ducked out of open water into a more protected anchorage.

High wind will make positioning hard

High wind causes several problems anchoring. The first is the effect on the boat - with a lot of wind, your boat's windage is much more pronounced, and as you slow down to anchor, it becomes harder to hold the boat on station and put the hook where you want it. Your bow is much more likely to fall off, and while idling into position you may even get blown to a stop or pushed backwards. If you stop, you lose the ability to steer and the wind may push you out of position.

When holding station to drop anchor, try these tips:

  • Use a little more engine power and come up to your anchor drop point with a little more speed to maintain steerage. Not a lot more, but an extra knot can keep your ability to steer.
  • You will blow backward quickly, so don't let the boat fall back until you've got enough rode out to hit bottom. Use small pulses of the engine forward to stay in place without overrunning the chain.
  • If you have main furling, cheating a tiny amount of sail out can help keep you pointed into the wind, like an anchoring sail on your stern might. You don't want too much sail area, since it may start driving the boat forward or even cause heeling. But a small triangle can help keep the boat in irons so you aren't swinging all over as you drop.

Communication will be harder

The other complication is communication - wind won't affect your hand signals, but wind noise can mess with radios by causing a loud hiss in your microphones that drowns out voices. If you use headsets with foam wind mufflers, make sure they're installed. If you don't have them or are using handhelds, a little piece of cloth can cut that wind hissing right out. A thin sock slipped over a handheld radio looks silly, but does a great job muffling wind noise.

Low visibility requires lights or radar

You can lose your visibility in heavy rain, fog, or darkness. Your solutions for each are a little different, as is the impact.

The primary risk of using hand signals without radios is lost visibility; if you can't see the bow, you can't communicate. In darkness, the fix is easy. Make sure bow and helm people have lights, and shine them on your hands when signaling (and not in each other's eyes!). Headlamps work well for this, since helm and bow both need their hands.

Lights won't help you in driving rain or fog, there you will need to do your best with hand signals or use a waterproof radio on the bow. Fortunately, rain and fog are rarely heavy enough to block vision from the helm to the bow, but if it is talking, your plan out first is critical.

If you have radar, make sure it's on when you come into an anchorage in poor visibility, and zoom it in far enough to distinguish boats and estimate distances. While everyone should have lights, we all know there's no guarantee of it. And judging distance from anchor lights in the dark is difficult. Whether it's fog, rain, or dark, your radar can light up the boats around you and give you a clue about their relative positions as you pick your place to drop anchor.

Tidal currents may cause drag

Dropping in tidal currents isn't difficult, but staying anchored can be. A strong pull in one direction can give you a great set, but when the tide changes and starts ripping a couple of knots in the other direction, it can pull your anchor out and cause you to drag.

When anchoring in a tidal zone, always note where you are in the tidal cycle - how much time until the next high or low, and which way it's moving. For the most extreme tidal currents, consider a Bahamian Moor with your two anchors in line with the current. For more details, see our article on using two anchors .

REMEMBER - most places with tidal currents also have a pretty big tidal swing. When you figure out your scope, you need to calculate your ratio from the top of high tide, so you don't get caught up short if you anchor near low tide.

If you anchor with only one anchor, take care to set extra hard, and use extra scope if there is room. Expect your anchor to reset every tide cycle, so the extra rode will give it time to re-bury itself, or even keep it from resetting.

Avoid anchoring in deep water in bad weather

Anchoring out in deep water always feels like standing on the edge of a cliff; there was never quite enough grip to really rest or feel comfortable. But sometimes, you have no choice - it's all there is, but it may be a little nerve-wracking.

If you have an all-chain rode, you can anchor in water up to about 1/3 of your rode length in calm and settled conditions . The conditions are the key - if you can not get out enough scope for wind and weather, you should not stay in a deep anchorage if bad weather develops.

For more detail, check out our article on deep water anchoring:

sailboat sea anchor

How to Anchor a Boat in Deep Water (like the ocean)

Sometimes, anchoring isn't so hard, but once you get settled in, you realize things aren't as comfortable as you hoped. When we dropped anchor at Santa Cruz in the Galapagos, it was comfortable when we arrived. But a few hours later, the ocean swell started coming in, and the wind on our bow kept us pointed across the incoming rollers, resulting in a sickening side-to-side roll as the boat swung at anchor.

This is avoidable.

Roll and Chop

If you're in an anchor with a lot of roll in it, set a stern anchor to point your bow into the roll and chop instead of letting your boat swing in the breeze and roll side to side. The up and down motion is much easier on your inner ear and will let you sleep at night. Don't worry about swinging into the wind unless you're expecting bad weather. But if you're expecting bad weather, an anchorage subject to swell isn't a good place to be, anyway.

The key is to keep the roll from hitting the side of your boat and creating that horrid motion.

Tight Quarters

Anchorages can be tight in two ways - they can be crowded, or they can be small or narrow. For crowded anchorages, look at our specific advice on handling a crowd .

With a tight anchorage, you don't want to risk swinging into shallows or bumping into rocks or other hazards. Fortunately, there are a few ways to deal with this.

  • Use a stern anchor
  • Try a Bahamian Moor if there is room; it should keep your boat swinging on a single point.
  • Tie one or more lines to shore to stop you from swinging.

The goal of these approaches is to keep your boat fixed in position or in a very limited swing radius. The best tool will depend on where you are anchoring and how much space you have with sound things to tie off to.

The market is awash with products to help you anchor more easily, but do they all work? The short answer is that some of them can help you, in some circumstances, but the effectiveness of some of them is debatable. And you can cause difficulties if you misuse them.

A kellet is a weight you attach to a midpoint in the catenary on the anchor rode. The theory is that it pulls the rode down more sharply to the bottom and gives a better angle of attack for pulling loads on the anchor shank. This is supposed to help increase holding power. Evidence and testing shows that once the wind blows hard enough to straighten out the rode, the effect of a kellet goes almost to zero for adding holding power.

That doesn't mean they have no value, especially with rope/chain combination rodes. A kellet can reduce the swinging and dancing your boat does at anchor by holding the rode down. But don't expect it to perform any miracles for you while anchored out in a forty-knot blow.

Anchor swivels eliminate twisting in the rode when you pull up the anchor. Some anchors are prone to spin like propellers when they hauled through the water, and this can put an undesirable twist in chain and rope. Too much twist can cause binding and knotting, and make pulling the anchor up in the right orientation to slide into the bow roller challenging.

If you are experience twist in your rode, look into swivels. Some manufacturers suggest them for their anchors, so heed their advice if you choose their anchors.

But an unnecessary swivel adds another weak point to your anchor rode, so if there is no need for one, don't add it. It's one more moving part to corrode, seize up, or break.

Trip lines are handy ways to get leverage on our anchor from points other than the end of the shank where the rode attaches. Many anchors provide extra loops, rings, and attachment points for a trip line, and they can be very helpful with obstructions on the bottom. Everything from rocks to discarded junk can catch on your anchor, and pulling a plow from the front may be a better way to dislodge it than hauling straight up on the shank.

You can rig trip lines with a float, or a line can be secure to the rode when the anchor is set. Either way, you need to take some care that the trip line doesn't tangle into the anchor or break loose until you need it.

Marker Floats

Marking a trip line with a float is an easy and convenient way to keep your trip line clear of the business end of the anchor, while making retrieval easier since you'll know exactly where your anchor is.

But they will make you very unpopular in a crowded anchorage, and you should only use them when there is plenty of space around you.

Remember - everyone swings together in a crowded field, and there will be times when your boat will swing right over someone else's anchor. If that anchor has a floating ball and a line on it, there's a risk it can bang your boat or get fouled on your rudder or propeller. A marker float increases how much open water you and your boat take up, and few people use them for this reason.

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Nomadic Sailing

12 Best Sailboat Anchors for Any Sailor

Anchor at bow of a boat

Having the ability to anchor out inside a nice peaceful bay or right outside of a marina avoiding all the hubbub can be an amazing feeling.

It’s an even better feeling knowing that your sailboat is securely fastened using the best sailboat anchor so that you don’t start floating away when the tide or wind starts to shift.

There are a lot of amazing anchors out there that are potentially a great fit for you and your sailboat as a primary anchor.

Having a clear understanding of what makes a good, high-quality sailboat anchor from a trusted brand means you’ll be able to make a more educated choice when deciding which anchor is best for you and your sailboat.

The Best Sailboat Anchors

Depending on your style of sailing and the whereabouts you like to explore, you may need one sailboat anchor over another.

Based on my experience, there are a lot of great options out there to choose from, which is why I put together the following list of the best sailboat anchors.

1. Rocna Vulcan Galvanized Anchor

sailboat sea anchor

One of the best sailboat anchors out there today based on being the best-selling anchor for yachts and workboats goes to the Rocna Vulcan Galvanized Anchor .

As one of the pioneering brands for sailboat anchors, the Rocna Vulcan was able to transform from the original Rocna anchor to the most dependable, best anchor out there today.

The Rocna Vulcan is actually a modified version of the original Rocna anchor, which was one of the most groundbreaking anchors to have been engineered and set the stage for the Rocna Vulcan.

The original Rocna anchor was designed in New Zealand back in 2004 and took the industry by storm. By taking the best features from more traditional anchor types, like the Bugel anchor and Spade anchor, it was able to set itself apart.

The Rocna Vulcan has a lot of fantastic features to it apart from being a very strong and powerful anchor. For one, it has the ability to dig into almost any type of seabed, which comes in handy when sailing in diverse locations.

It’s also relatively lightweight and easy to stow due to it not having a roll bar like its older brother, the original Rocna.

Another great feature is that it has no moving parts, so no one’s fingers have the chance of getting pinched.

When it comes to the construction material of the anchor, the Rocna Vulcan is a galvanized steel boat anchor, which means it’s very strong, long-lasting, and relatively inexpensive.

The design of this sailboat anchor allows for it to self-right itself when landing on the seabed and when being pushed around by currents and tides. It also comes with a lifetime warranty, so it’s guaranteed to last the lifetime of your sailboat.

All in all, the Rocna Vulcan is a great choice for any sailboat looking to anchor out.

Regardless of where you are, it’s highly likely you’ll be able to use your Rocna Vulcan to anchor and feel good that you have a popular, well-designed anchor manufactured by a trusted brand.

If you’re serious about getting one of the best boat anchors, definitely check it out.

2. Manson Galvanized Supreme Anchor

sailboat sea anchor

As one of the most famous boat anchors that were released when the original Rocna anchor came out is the Manson Galvanized Supreme Anchor .

As a matter of fact, this anchor came out in 2003 and is well known to this day as being extremely effective due to having a very high holding power, an effective roll bar, and an ability to settle to the seabed quickly.

You certainly cannot go wrong with a Manson Supreme anchor if you decide to get one. They have very high holding power, are able to dig into almost any seabed, have no moving parts, and are able to touch the seabed quickly.

While their major advantages are definitely the holding power and fast settling, this comes at the price of being rather heavy which can make stowing this anchor difficult at times.

3. Lewmar Galvanized Delta Anchor

sailboat sea anchor

Even though there are a number of modern anchor types that have taken the industry by storm, some of the more traditional designs still hold their weight to this day.

That’s why the Lewmar Galvanized Delta Anchor  is still on the anchor scene, especially since it’s been a hallmark anchor for a very long time.

There are a number of good reasons to go with this anchor by Lewmar especially the fact that it has a strong holding power in softer seabeds (like mud and sand).

It’s also relatively lighter than other sailboat anchors allowing for easy stowing and transportation. Another great quality is that it’s all one piece, so there’s no potential issue of pinched fingers.

The only downsides include that it sometimes requires a tripping anchor line to release it from the seabed and that it’s not ideal for hard seabeds or seabeds covered in kelp.

4. Spade Anchor S120 Galvanized Steel

sailboat sea anchor

Another well-known, traditional design for anchors is the Spade Anchor S120 Galvanized Steel .

This type of anchor has been around for quite some time and has proven itself as a worthy contender to even the newer, more modern anchor types.

It certainly set the stage for a lot of anchor designs today and it continues to shine even today.

The Spade anchor is a very popular style of anchor that was designed in France back in 1996.

It was based on the delta style anchor design in a way to achieve a similar grip power to the seabed but by providing an even large surface area contact to the seabed.

This sailboat anchor is lightweight and can dig into soft seabeds quite well making it a great fisherman anchor for most fishing boats.

One of the downsides is that it sometimes Spade anchors needs the assistance of a tripping line to remove it from the seabed.

5. Lewmar CQR Anchor

sailboat sea anchor

Of all the more traditional anchors out there today, one of the most famous that really shook the anchor industry is the Lewmar CQR Anchor .

Before the more modern sailboat anchors, the CQR anchor (or the plow style anchor generally) was the go-to anchor for many yachts and workboats.

If you’re looking for a classic, time-tested anchor, the CQR might be the anchor for you.

The CQR anchor was designed in the UK way back in 1933 and has been one of the most well-known anchors out there. It was known to be so secure (and it still is), that it was named CQR because it sounded like “secure”.

This anchor’s relatively lightweight, digs into the seabed quite well, and is rather versatile in terms of the texture of the seabed it can grip.

However, it does have some downsides including it being oddly shaped so stowing is more difficult, it has moving parts, and it sometimes requires a tripping anchor line to remove it from the seabed.

6. Lewmar Claw Anchor

sailboat sea anchor

Another great anchor that’s been around for a while is the Lewmar Claw Anchor , which has been known as either the Bruce or Claw anchor in the past.

The strong reputation of Claw anchors has been well-known in the anchor industry for a long time and is further proven due to being manufactured by the trusted brand Lewmar.

The Lewmar Claw anchor is a fantastic anchor to own due to it being relatively lightweight, strong, and inexpensive.

As a matter of fact, it’s one of the best sailboat anchors anyone can buy since it has a lot of positive advantages like it has no moving parts and it’s easy to remove from the seabed.

The only downsides include it having an odd shape, making it a bit more difficult to stow, and not being the best when penetrating seaweed or grass-like seabeds.

7. Danforth S-600 Standard Anchor

sailboat sea anchor

There’s no doubt that even some of the traditional anchors still have a place in the best anchor category and that goes double for the Danforth S-600 Standard Anchor .

Similar to the CQR anchor, this anchor has been around for quite some time and was developed in the US back in the 1940s.

As a matter of fact, they were originally manufactured to be equipped with certain landing aircraft during WW2.

The Danforth anchor is an industry standard and has been a hallmark for many decades. They’ve been used as anchors for many types of vessels and are especially good for anchoring out in loose seabeds like sand or mud.

It’s also relatively lightweight and can be stowed easily since it’s pretty flat. Unfortunately, it has some moving parts to it, sometimes requires a tripping line to get it out of the seabed, and is certainly not ideal for more rocky seabeds.

8. Norestar Stainless Steel Danforth-Style Anchor

sailboat sea anchor

While the original Danforth anchor is a great choice for your next anchor, a step up in terms of quality is the Norestar Stainless Steel Danforth-Style Anchor .

While you’ll certainly spend a bit more money for this Danforth-style anchor, the design improvements ensure a safer anchoring and a longer-lasting product.

This Danforth-style anchor by Norestar provides all of the advantages of owning a traditional Danforth with some extras.

First, it has no movable parts so there’s no chance of pinching fingers while operating the anchor.

Second, it allows for anchoring off in seabeds that are rockier than the original Danforth can handle. It even comes in stainless steel, which means this anchor will last a very long time.

It does, however, still have the downside of at times needing a tripping line to release it from the seabed.

9. Norestar Stainless Steel Bruce Anchor

sailboat sea anchor

The Bruce anchor (also known as the Claw anchor) is a popular style of anchor that’s been used for a very long time.

There’s no question the Norestar Stainless Steel Bruce Anchor is a step up in the design of this anchor style, similar to how they improved the Danforth.

This Bruce/Claw anchor is a great choice for your sailboat’s next anchor since it has a good holding power for almost any seabed texture.

It’s also quite lightweight, has no moving parts, and it’s very easy to break it from the seabed.

Even better, it’s made out of stainless steel, so it’s built to last. Honestly, there aren’t too many downsides to this anchor apart from it being relatively expensive.

10. Norestar Stainless Steel Delta Anchor

sailboat sea anchor

The Norestar brand is amazing at taking the more traditional style of anchors and improving its designs to make them more attractive.

Well, they’ve done that once again with the Norestar Stainless Steel Delta Anchor .

The Delta anchor was already an improvement to the CQR anchor, but Norestar decided to take it to the next level.

The Delta anchor by Norestar is one of the highest quality stainless steel, delta-style anchors you could put on your sailboat.

Apart from it being stainless steel like the rest of Norestar’s anchors, it’s also lightweight, has no moving parts, and has a powerful holding power in softer seabeds.

However, it might not be the best sailboat anchor on seabeds with hard sand and it might require a tripping line to set it free from the seabed.

11. Mantus Galvanized Anchor

sailboat sea anchor

Some of the best sailboat anchors are originally derived from the more traditional sailboat anchors (in particular those with a roll bar), which is definitely the case for the Mantus Galvanized Anchor .

As one of the most well-known anchor types out there, this anchor manufactured by Mantus Marine stands out as a top contender for the best sailboat anchor.

This anchor by Mantus is produced with galvanized steel which makes it quite strong, inexpensive, and dependable.

With its uniquely designed roll bar, this sailboat anchor is able to properly land on the seabed when making its descent resulting in getting a better grip of wherever it ends up.

This anchor is specifically designed to break through dense grassy bottoms, so definitely a consideration when buying your next sailboat anchor.

12. Fortress Anchor

sailboat sea anchor

Sometimes it’s important to break free from the most well-known anchor brands and see what else is out there.

After stepping outside and digging into other anchor styles, I fell upon the Fortress Anchor , which is an aluminum fluke anchor that has a lot of common characteristics found in the traditional Danforth-style sailboat anchor.

The Fortress anchor has a very similar design to the Danforth but differs in the sense that it’s even more lightweight since it’s made out of aluminum magnesium alloy.

Some of the clear advantages that make this a candidate for the best sailboat anchor are that it settles quickly to the bottom of the seabed, it can be disassembled for easy storage, and it’s been tested to have double the holding power compared to its competition.

Downsides include movable parts, sometimes requiring a tripping line to remove it from the seabed, and not being ideal for rocky seabeds.

What to Consider Before Buying a Sailboat Anchor

We went over a good amount of high-quality sailboat anchors just now, so you should have a good idea of what anchor you might consider purchasing for your sailboat.

However, there are a few considerations to take into account before making that purchase, which is what we’ll cover now.

Construction Materials

You’ll find a number of different construction materials for anchors, like aluminum and steel, but by far the most common materials you’ll find is a metal anchor made of steel or aluminum alloy.

Galvanized Steel

Anchors made out of galvanized steel are often found to be less expensive and shiny compared to other types of anchor materials.

The great part is that they’re very strong and can last a very long time. Unfortunately, they’re prone to corrosion so it’s not uncommon to have to get them re-galvanized.

Stainless Steel

Anchors made out of stainless steel are very strong and aesthetically pleasing in terms of their appearance since it’s rather shiny.

You can’t go wrong with getting a stainless steel anchor, but you’ll definitely be forking over more money to get one.

Aluminum Alloy

Anchors made out of aluminum alloy are very lightweight compared to steel but often come at a much higher cost when going through the checkout line. However, when set correctly on the seabed, they’re known to have very high holding power.

Lakes vs. Coastal Waterways

Depending on where you’re sailing, you’ll need a certain level of strength to keep your sailboat from moving around while anchored.

Sailing in coastal waterways definitely requires a strong anchor than when sailing around lakes, so it’s generally advised to stick with the stronger anchors just in case.

If you know your sailboat will never leave the lake scene, go with a weaker (and thus cheaper) anchor.

Anchor Weight to Boat Length

You might’ve been wondering how strong your anchor should be based on the size of your sailboat.

Well, there’s no hard and fast rule to the exact strength (or weight) your anchor should have, but it’s definitely possible to determine a minimum weight to cover some worst-case scenarios when using your anchor.

A simple way to determine the minimum anchor weight of your sailboat is to subtract 5-10 lbs from every foot of your sailboat’s length overall (LOA). For example, if your sailboat is 40 feet long, then a 35 lb boat anchor would be a good weight.

This is a good rule of thumb when choosing an anchor weight for your sailboat, but should only be considered as an estimate and for minimum weight.

If the anchor you plan to purchase has a chart helping you decide on the proper weight to get, you should definitely follow that.

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Corporate,Government & MilitaryMega Yachts & Large Ships.




                                                                             


Welcome Aboard!
Whether you're a novice or an offshore expert, here's a great place to start. See the full Fiorentino Rigging Set-Up at work. To learn why the para-anchor  ("parachute style" sea anchor) can be used on any type of boat


 
You'll need a Fiorentino parachute sea anchor, Fiorentino Deployment Rode and a Fiorentino Trip Line. Simply drop the parachute sea anchor off the bow of any large vessel or any small boat and your're done. Anything after that is optional.... For example, sailboat owners may prefer to birdle their parachute sea anchor for a more comfortable ride as seen in the sailboat illustration below. How much anchor rode
Most average size trawlers and sailboats will pay out 300' to 600' of rode. Sport fishermen will pay out an average of 20-100' of rode
:



Fiorentino technical reports 
The and quality behind Fiorentino parachute sea anchors and storm drogues.


 
  1. Offshore Para-Anchor
  2. Coastal Para-Anchor
  3. Shark Storm Drogue
5. Clearance


Offshore passages, riding out the storrm,
making repairs, resting. 


 
Sportfishing of all types, coastal emergency,
resting. Small to large boats. 
 

emergency steering and running from
the weather. 
 

to small boats.


Every product includes a DVD that 
provides you full instructions on how
to operate your Fiorentino para-anchor
or storm drogue
.   
Manufactured in the U.S.A.


at 949-631-2336










Fiorentino Gets A Ride into Space   Rutherford Storm Prepared "Zack's Constant Rode Tension" Seminars Home of the ORIGINAL   parachute style sea anchor for over  60 years ! 

Established in 1958 on the West Coast of the Americas, Fiorentino has become a world leading authority and U.S. manufacturer for underwater parachute sea anchors and storm drogues. Available in all sizes for the recreational boater and marine specialty market. Wholesale and resale. Contact Information

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Rig it yourself - do
all the work for you at no extra cost!
 

sea
   anchor (para-anchor) by Fiorentino


Fiorentino's rigging set-ups and parachute sea anchors have been used successfully for
Fiorentino has outfitted every type of boat imaginable--trawlers, sailboats, commercial boats, fishing boats, mega yachts, ships, kayaks, inboards, outboards flat bottom boats, including many unusual on-the-water
specialty projects.

                         




























                 




bridle their parachute
       sea anchor for a more comfortable ride as seen in this
       monohull llustration.



       
       
       
       


                                

  of each accessory. To earn more about proper rigging techniques visit
Rigging Navigation     











Join Fiorentino on Facebook!











 

: High degree of visibility allows a skipper to easily motor toward the retrieval float to capture the trip line. Large enough to prevent the parachute sea anchor (para-anchor) from sinking too deep under the water when anchor rode is slack. : Your own boat fender may be used in place of a Fiorentino retrieval float.

Provides necessary tension in trip line to avoid slack. Also serves as an excellent marker to help determine para-anchor depth.

: Enables the top of the canopy to be pulled more easily to the boat. Why not build your own trip line? To learn how see


  Reduces parachute rotation and prevents shrouds from twisting. Weight placement aids the parachute sea anchor's capabilities by holding it deeper beneath the water and away from dangerous breaking seas.



Para-Ring Hardware -- made
affordable to all boaters!



 
. In boiling seas and strong ocean currents, the self-adjusting Para-Ring prevents the elements from pushing, rolling, or spinning a parachute anchor out of control, which can lead to a tangled parachute or blown out canopy panel.  Parachute sea anchor balance is achieved as the Para-Ring self-adjusts to uneven shock loads that are carried down the shroud lines from the canopy. The tilting of the Para-Ring neutralizes the mixed energy to create an even pull on the parachute canopy. This prevents breakage and chafe.



The amount of rode needed during deployment depends on a vessel's response to various weather conditions - usually 10-feet of rode for every foot of boat Because it stretches under tension, the rode absorbs massive shock loads.


 


: The block's ability to open allows the block to be clamped over anchor rode in the event that rigging a bridle becomes necessary.
When attached to the anchor rode, the pendant line can be connected to a stern winch to form a bridle, which is then used to hold a vessel in a heave-to position during heavy seas. To position multihulls and trawlers into the weather secure the pendent line to a bow cleat. Why not build your own pendant line? To learn how see

 
I: Pendant Line Support Floats : These floats keep the pendant line afloat whenever it becomes slack.


 

you let us do all the work for you!  Please contact one of our authorized dealers or   

Office:
:

   
        Manufactured in Newport Beach CA U.S.A.


 
About Zack














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rights reserved. The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached,
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The Tall Ships Races will be held in Turku every four years from now on – Turku is the Baltic Sea's first anchor port designated by Sail Training International

Suuret purjelaivat kuvattuna Aurajoessa

The Tall Ships Races in Turku 18–21 July 2024

  • https://tallshipsturku.fi/
  • Facebook: Tall Ships Races Turku , Turun kaupunki – Åbo stad – City of Turku
  • Instagram: @tallshipsracesturku , @turkukaupunki

With the anchor port agreement, Turku will host The Tall Ships Races regularly every four years in the future. Normally, the hosting of the event has to be applied for separately from Sail Training International (STI). According to STI's Anchor Port Scheme, only one anchor port can be named as an anchor port from each country and only 1–3 from each sea area. With the agreement, Turku will become the world's fourth anchor port in addition to Aalborg, Esbjerg and Antwerp.

Mayor of Turku, Minna Arve , sees the anchor port status as a remarkable recognition for Turku's long-term and successful work as the organizer of The Tall Ships Races events.

– As a port city, the sea has always been an inseparable part of Turku, and as the capital of the world's most beautiful archipelago, we also have a special responsibility for the protection of the unique and delicate Archipelago Sea. We are committed to continuing our ambitious work so that future generations can enjoy the beauty and diversity of the sea. As a maritime event, The Tall Ships Races offers an excellent opportunity to highlight this important theme, Arve says.

According to Turku Port Committee chairman Jarkko Virtanen , the certainty of organizing the event every four years enables long-term and more permanent investments in event production. The event with about half a million visitors also brings some significant economic benefits for both the city and local entrepreneurs.

– The regional economic effects of a single Tall Ships Races event are estimated to be around 36–40 million euros. The event interests a wide variety of people year after year. As an open and free-of-charge event The Tall Ships Races is also accessible to everyone regardless of income level, says Virtanen.

Nainen ja mies kättelevät pöydän ääressä, edessään sopimuspapereita.

The Tall Ships Races will be held in Turku this year for the sixth time on July 18–21. The event has been organized previously in 1996, 2003, 2009 and 2017. In addition, in 2011, The Culture Tall Ships Races Regatta was organized in honor of the European Capital of Culture year of Turku. The event planned for 2021 had to be canceled due to the covid pandemic. With the anchor port agreement, The Tall Ships Races will be held in Turku next time in 2028 and in 2032.

Half a million visitors are expected to participate the Turku The Tall Ships Races event this year. The event emphasizes Turku's role as an international event city and supports youth sailing and the protection of the Baltic Sea.

Follow the event!

The event website www.tallshipsturku.fi has compiled comprehensive information about the event area and program, as well as transport connections, parking and arrival in Turku.

The city of Turku will communicate about the event with press releases and on social media. 

The daily visitor numbers will be released in social media in the following day. The total number of visitors and other important event information will be released in the week after the event.

This year, a comprehensive audience survey will also be conducted about the event, which will reveal, among other things, the regional economic effects of the event. The results of the survey will be completed in autumn 2024.

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  • Safety & Seamanship

Sea Anchor Match-up

Sea anchors have evolved to become a vital component of the serious sailor's arsenal in heavy weather. we tested models from para-tech and fiorentino, and favor fiorentino's for their rugged construction..

sailboat sea anchor

According to Earl Hinz, a veteran cruiser and a recognized expert on contending with heavy weather at sea, the concept of sea anchors can be traced back as far as 1200 AD when Polynesian mariners used stone ground anchors and lines fashioned from coconut fibers for the purpose of keeping their double-hulled canoes into the wind while at sea. (We extracted that nugget from Heavy Weather Tactics Using Sea Anchors and Drogues, Paradise Cay Publications 2000, one of several books Hinz has written.)

Hinz identifies the advent of parachute-style sea anchors as some time around World War II. It’s commonly understood that these devices began to gain favor among offshore sailors in the late ’70s and early ’80s. Since then, they have been refined and are now commercially available from several sources.

When properly deployed, a well-designed and well-built sea anchor can be an excellent tool to control vessel drift under a variety of conditions. If things go badly, and your vessel is adrift without power or a rig, a sea anchor can hold the vessel’s bow into a seaway, substantially improving the boat’s ability to safely ride out the weather. And if the need arose, a sea anchor could even keep a vessel in distress off a lee shore. For these reasons, many knowledgeable blue-water cruisers consider sea anchors manadatory safety gear.

Before continuing, it’s important to note that sea anchors are distinct from drogues. Hinz defines the former as “a large drag device deployed over the bow of a boat to hold the bow into the wind and the waves…A proper sea anchor will hold the backward drift to under 1 or 2 knots maximum…A sea anchor is used when the boat is disabled or the crew no longer wishes to sail, but would simply like to hold a relatively safe position and attitude with respect to the seas.”

A drogue, wrote Hinz: “is a smaller drag-producing device that is deployed over the stern of a boat to slow its forward progress when running downwind and, to some extent, to hold the stern to the seas…” It would be folly for any mariner to confuse the two or their respective applications.

We recently reviewed a group of six sea anchors, deploying three of them in actual tests conducted in 5- to 8-foot waves.

What We Tested Fiorentino and Para-Tech, manufacturers well known for their high-quality, parachute-style sea anchors, provided a number of samples for testing and review. (Both companies manufacture sea anchors in various sizes up to 40 feet.) California-based Fiorentino has two lines of sea anchors and sent samples of each. The Coast-9 is a 9-foot diameter anchor designed, as the name implies, for coastal operations. The FPA-9, also 9 feet in diameter, is a heavier duty sea anchor designated as the offshore model. Fiorentino also sent a Coast-16 and FPA-18.

Colorado-based Para-Tech sent one anchor—its 15-footer. Our test boat—a 25-foot center console powerboat weighing 3,100 lbs.—was already equipped with a 9-foot model from Para-Tech.

How We Tested The 9-foot sea anchor kept aboard our test boat is set up with a 20-foot rode of half-inch, three-strand nylon, a primary float, and 50 feet of half-inch polypropylene trip line. (It’s actually a drift-fishing setup for use when the waves don’t exceed five feet.) We used this setup as the first stage of our test for the 9-foot sea anchors.

We also tested each by adding 300 feet of 1/2″, three-strand nylon line to the sea anchor to mimic the rode length that one might use during heavy weather conditions in an emergency. Fiorentino provided floats and a trip line for its 9-foot sea anchors, and we deployed both with that provided gear. This same rode was used for all the sea anchors we deployed. As each test was completed, we switched the rode over to the next anchor using a large shackle to secure it to the parachute thimble.

Strong east winds blowing for several days prior to our test produced wave heights of 5 to 8 feet during our deployment testing. In addition to the consideration given for in-water testing, the 9-foot sea anchors were also reviewed for price, construction quality, and warranty.

The larger sea anchors were not suitable for in-water deployment with our test boat; but we did review their specifications, construction quality, pricing, and warranties.

Fiorentino Fiorentino uses similar construction techniques on both its 9-foot sea anchors. The offshore-designated FPA-9 and the lighter-duty Coast-9 use a multi-section canopy fashioned from 8 oz. nylon, with 2″ nylon webbing sewn onto the skirt and 1″ nylon webbing on the vent hole opening. Shroud lines are multi-braid nylon line rated at 2,500 lbs. breaking strength. To make a solid connection to the canopy, each shroud line is sewn directly to the canopy over a total length of 14″.

The bitter end of each shroud line is double-looped over the Para-Ring® (see photo above) and locked in place by back-sewing two inches of the line together. The Para-Ring® is approximately 6″ in diameter with two U-shaped brackets welded to the ring, which secure a large swivel. All Para-Ring® components are stainless steel. The swivel serves as the attachment point for the sea anchor rode. Additional multi-braid nylon lines attached around the vent hole of the canopy serve as the tripline attachment point.

Both Fiorentino’s 9-footers have 2 pounds of lead weights sewn into the canopy skirt on one side to stabilize the chute in the water and to encourage it to sink beneath the surface. A stowage bag is included with the purchase of any Fiorentino Coast or Offshore sea anchor, along with an instructional DVD or video.

Here are the differences between the two 9-footers: The more heavily built FPA-9 uses 16 sections in the canopy construction, whereas the Coast-9 uses only eight. It also has twice the number of shroud lines; again 16 for the FPA-9 and eight for the Coast-9. The Para-Ring® and swivel are also a size larger on the offshore sea anchor and the nylon panels have a higher thread count. At the tripline attachment point, the inshore model uses four lines while the offshore one uses eight. And the FPA-9 weighs 19 lbs., whereas the Coast-9 weighs just 13 lbs.

Both Fiorentino 9-footers performed well in the moderate sea conditions present during our testing. When we tested each with the short fishing rode, there was significant reversing in rode pressure from taut to slack as waves and troughs alternately rolled under the boat. This is to be expected when using such a short lead under these sea conditions. Once the rode was lengthened to 300 feet, the boat settled smoothly into the waves, maintaining a course within 20 degrees of directly into the seas. Whenever a series of larger waves rolled through, the boat centered up and headed dead into the waves.

We deployed one of the 9-footers using an optional Fiorentino deployment bag. The other went straight in the water without a bag. Both deployed properly without any tangling, which is a critical issue when deploying sea anchors.

The two larger Fiorentino sea anchors we examined, the Coast-16 and the FPA-18, are constructed in a like fashion, using the same materials as the smaller chutes. Each is beefed up to provide the needed additional strength to support the strain that largers vessels would put on these devices.

Sea Anchor Match-up

The Coast-16 canopy is constructed in 12 sections using the same number of shroud lines run to a Para-Ring® the same size as the one on the offshore FPA-9. The slightly larger and more heavily built FPA-18 has a canopy with 28 sections and the same number of shroud lines fitted to a heavy-duty Para-Ring®.

At Fiorentino’s website we found the Coast-9 priced at $396 and the offshore FPA-9 for $677. The price includes free freight within the U.S. The warranty on all Fiorentino sea anchors is five years. Optional rigging gear available from Fiorentino includes floats, trip lines, and of course, an anchor rode.

Bottom Line: These are top-of-the-line sea anchors, well built, using high-grade, 8 oz. nylon panels and stainless-steel hardware.

Para-Tech The 9-foot Para-Tech sea anchor uses eight sections of 4 oz. nylon to form the canopy. The seams in the canopy, the canopy skirt, and vent opening are all reinforced with nylon webbing. On the seams, 1/2″ webbing is used with 1″ webbing strengthening the other areas. Heavy-duty 1/2″ webbing is used for the vent hole shroud lines while a heavier webbing strap serves as the float line attachment point.

The main shroud lines, made from 9/16″ tubular nylon webbing, are sewn onto the bottom five inches of the canopy at section seams. Additional webbing serves to connect the reinforced skirt to each of the eight shroud lines. Shroud lines terminate into a pair of 22″-long straps made from 1″-wide, heavy-duty nylon webbing shaped to hold the anchor rode attachment shackle.

Para-Tech products are “failure tolerant,” meaning if the whole system is over-stressed, the sea anchor is designed to blow a panel, but will still keep a boat’s bow into the seas though the rate of drift will increase slightly.

A 10-foot section of float line, made of the same material as the main shroud lines, is attached to both the chute and a storage bag that comes standard with the Para-Tech sea anchor. When stored, the 9-footer fits in a bag that measures about 8 inches in diameter and 10 inches high.

We rigged our sea anchor with 50 feet of additional tripline by attaching it directly to the short section of factory installed tripline. The anchor rode for fishing is only 20 feet long; it attaches to the parachute shackle on one end while the other end gets looped over the bow cleat. We used a long line float and clip to attach the float for deployment.

The trip line is secured to the bow cleat; that way we can quickly and easily collapse the sea anchor by hand without powering forward with the boat. This setup makes pulling the anchor quickly quite easy.

Unlike the Fiorentino sea anchors, the Para-Tech products carry no added weight in the canopy. Para-Tech sea anchors don’t rotate, say company representatives, because of the unique pattern of the canopy seams. We detected no rotation with Para-Tech’s 9-foot model while deployed.

The performance of the Para-Tech 9-footer was identical to the pair of Fiorentino sea anchors, both on the short fishing rode and on the long rode. The anchor was deployed directly from its storage bag (included with the Para-Tech); it did require a couple of tugs on the main rode to get the anchor out of the bag. Once out, it deployed cleanly with no tangling.

The Para-Tech 15 is a 9-footer on steroids. It uses the same canopy material, but is made in 16 sections and uses 16 main shroud lines. These terminate into four, 36″ x 2″ sections of nylon webbing that form a hole for a large shackle. When packed in its stowage bag, the 15-footer measures 11″ in diameter and 15″ high.

We priced the Para-Tech anchors on the company’s website. The 9-footer is $349 while the larger 15-footer is priced at $859. All Para-Tech sea anchors carry a five-year warranty and come with a stowage bag, float line, heavy duty shackle and instruction manual. Available accessories include anchor rodes and a choice of stainless, galvanized or titanium hardware.

Bottom Line: The Para-Tech 9-footer is a well made product. It differs from the Fiorentino in a few key ways, particularly that its panels are made of lighter nylon material and its shroud lines are made from nylon webbing instead of line, and rated for 2,000 lbs. breaking strength instead of 2,500 lbs.

A Word to the Wise In his aforementioned book, Earl Hinz spends almost 30 pages discussing the proper use of sea anchors. There’s an important reason for this. Improperly deployed sea anchors can lead to disastrous consequences.

Sea Anchor Match-up

Determining the size and length of the rode you use in conjunction with a sea anchor are important considerations. “It is essential,” wrote Hinz in his tome, “that the length of the sea anchor rode be matched to the wave length of the sea…” He recommends setting the length of the rode so that both the boat and the canopy ride on the crests of immediately adjacent waves. That way, “they experience the same orbital motions of the surface water and hence move in harmony with each other.”

The diameter and strength of the rode should be determined with a number of factors in mind. “The rode,” explained Hinz, “…must have elasticity to absorb surge loads. For this reason, nylon rope is the best choice.” He favors braided line over three-strand despite the loss of elasticity.

For the serious offshore sailor and novice alike, Hinz’s book can be an important resource for selecting a sea anchor and rode. (See PS Aug. 1, ’00 for advice on sizing a sea anchor.)

Conclusions All of the sea anchors we looked at are of good quality and should last for years considering how rarely they’re used. There are also others on the market that we didn’t test, including those from Dan Shewmon, Cal-June, and W.A. Coppins in New Zealand.

The 9-footers that we tested in the water performed properly. They are well constructed and carry substantial warranties. If not for the difference in the weight of the cloth used to fabricate each companies’ product, and the rated breaking strength of the shrouds, we’d be left with little but price to pick a winner. But that’s not the case.

Yes, the 9-foot sea anchor from Para-Tech is less expensive than its counterparts from Fiorentino, particularly the FPA-9. However, Para-Tech doesn’t include a swivel, which would add $40 to $60 to the price, and shipping isn’t included either. But sea anchors are products intended for use in emergency situations, and at those times, we’d feel more comfortable relying on something that’s overbuilt. Because of that, we’d gladly pay the additional money for Fiorentino’s products because we feel their more rugged construction will enable them to endure Neptune’s savage moods longer than those from Para-Tech.

Also With This Article “Spec Sheet: Sea Anchors”

Contacts • Fiorentino, 800/777-0732, www.paraanchor.com • Para-Tech, 800/594-0011, www.seaanchor.com

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2. Not only is this switch too darn close to the winch, there is a silly wire drink holder near the path of the lines and a person sitting on the bench can easily fall into a running, unguarded, electric winch. Unspeakably dangerous and OSHA would just shut you down. (Photo/ Drew Frye)

Electric Winch and Windlass Safety

The three-strand nylon anchor rode was likely severed by a submerged metal object 30 feet from the boat. While Alex had 20 feet of chain attached to the 50 feet of nylon rode, it wasn't enough chain to battle the submerged object. (Photo/ Alex Jasper)

Severed Anchor in the Bahamas: Seven Lessons Learned

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Dave Portnoy Rescued by the Coast Guard After He Was 'Lost at Sea': 'No Power, No Radio, No Anchor'

Dave Portnoy looks on prior to Game Four of the 2024 NBA Finals between the Dallas Mavericks and the Boston Celtics at American Airlines Center on June 14, 2024 in Dallas, Texas

Barstool CEO Dave Portnoy says he was almost "lost to the ocean" and had to be rescued by the U.S. Coast Guard.

Barstool Sports CEO Dave Portnoy says he is lucky to be alive today after having to be rescued by the U.S. Coast Guard just outside of Boston.

On Monday, the 47-year-old Massachusetts native and social media personality took to X (formerly Twitter) to recount the experience of how he was "almost was lost to the ocean" after his boat lost power and was drifting slowly out to sea near Nantucket. 

In a video shared with his 3.2 million followers on the online platform, Portnoy -- who repeatedly referred to himself as "Captain Dave" in the video -- explained that he had unhooked his boat from its buoy and began floating away from the harbor with zero control.

"No power, no radio, no anchor, no nothing, heavy, heavy winds," he shared. "Next thing you know, Captain Dave is lost at sea."

Portnoy continued, saying that he was doing his best to avoid other boats in the harbor and stop himself from crashing into vessels as he drifted. At one point, he says he used his boat's flare gun to signal for help from anyone nearby. 

The businessman finally came into contact with "some girl in what looks like a rowboat" who he said was able to call for help from the Coast Guard using her radio. Portnoy also colorfully added that after she boarded his boat, the girl -- seemingly a fan -- asked to make a TikTok with him, to which he responded, "No time for TikToks."

Coast Guard officials were quickly dispatched to the scene and were able to bring the "Barstool Presidente" back to safety where he thanked them for the assist and credited the "four burley dudes" from the agency for saving his life. 

"Thankfully the Coast Guard, God bless their souls, tied me up, brings me back -- Captain Dave lives to tell another tale," he shared.

According to a statement sent by Coast Guard representatives to NBC 10 Boston, several members of the team did in fact rescue the influential online figure after an incident involving his boat drifting out to sea. 

Additionally, the U.S. Coast Guard's Northeast division ended up quoting Portnoy's tweet on Monday afternoon, confirming his retelling of the events and reminding their followers to take precautions while out on the water. 

"You’re welcome, Dave. Tell Miss Peaches we said hi and remember to boat safe! #SemperParatus ," they wrote, referencing Portnoy's dog, Miss Peaches, who has more than 1 million Instagram followers. 

The scary experience clearly didn't impact Portnoy's sense of humor, however, as he later shared a screengrab of one article detailing the day's events, captioning the post on X , "Island life."

Glad to hear he's safe!

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The Unique Burial of a Child of Early Scythian Time at the Cemetery of Saryg-Bulun (Tuva)

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Pages:  379-406

In 1988, the Tuvan Archaeological Expedition (led by M. E. Kilunovskaya and V. A. Semenov) discovered a unique burial of the early Iron Age at Saryg-Bulun in Central Tuva. There are two burial mounds of the Aldy-Bel culture dated by 7th century BC. Within the barrows, which adjoined one another, forming a figure-of-eight, there were discovered 7 burials, from which a representative collection of artifacts was recovered. Burial 5 was the most unique, it was found in a coffin made of a larch trunk, with a tightly closed lid. Due to the preservative properties of larch and lack of air access, the coffin contained a well-preserved mummy of a child with an accompanying set of grave goods. The interred individual retained the skin on his face and had a leather headdress painted with red pigment and a coat, sewn from jerboa fur. The coat was belted with a leather belt with bronze ornaments and buckles. Besides that, a leather quiver with arrows with the shafts decorated with painted ornaments, fully preserved battle pick and a bow were buried in the coffin. Unexpectedly, the full-genomic analysis, showed that the individual was female. This fact opens a new aspect in the study of the social history of the Scythian society and perhaps brings us back to the myth of the Amazons, discussed by Herodotus. Of course, this discovery is unique in its preservation for the Scythian culture of Tuva and requires careful study and conservation.

Keywords: Tuva, Early Iron Age, early Scythian period, Aldy-Bel culture, barrow, burial in the coffin, mummy, full genome sequencing, aDNA

Information about authors: Marina Kilunovskaya (Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation). Candidate of Historical Sciences. Institute for the History of Material Culture of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Dvortsovaya Emb., 18, Saint Petersburg, 191186, Russian Federation E-mail: [email protected] Vladimir Semenov (Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation). Candidate of Historical Sciences. Institute for the History of Material Culture of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Dvortsovaya Emb., 18, Saint Petersburg, 191186, Russian Federation E-mail: [email protected] Varvara Busova  (Moscow, Russian Federation).  (Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation). Institute for the History of Material Culture of the Russian Academy of Sciences.  Dvortsovaya Emb., 18, Saint Petersburg, 191186, Russian Federation E-mail:  [email protected] Kharis Mustafin  (Moscow, Russian Federation). Candidate of Technical Sciences. Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology.  Institutsky Lane, 9, Dolgoprudny, 141701, Moscow Oblast, Russian Federation E-mail:  [email protected] Irina Alborova  (Moscow, Russian Federation). Candidate of Biological Sciences. Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology.  Institutsky Lane, 9, Dolgoprudny, 141701, Moscow Oblast, Russian Federation E-mail:  [email protected] Alina Matzvai  (Moscow, Russian Federation). Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology.  Institutsky Lane, 9, Dolgoprudny, 141701, Moscow Oblast, Russian Federation E-mail:  [email protected]

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Beijing's 'monster ship,' the world's largest coastguard vessel, dropped anchor in the South China Sea

  • China's largest coastguard ship dropped anchor in Manila's exclusive economic zone earlier this week.
  • The vessel anchored there as "an intimidation," the Philippine Coast Guard said.
  • Maritime relations between China and the Philippines have become increasingly tense in recent months.

Insider Today

The world's largest coastguard ship dropped anchor in Manila's exclusive economic zone (EEZ) in the South China Sea earlier this week, the Philippine Coast Guard (PCG) said.

Jay Tarriela, a spokesperson for the PCG, wrote on X that the authority had successfully tracked the movements of the China Coast Guard's (CCG) "165-meter monster ship" by "using Canada's Dark Vessel Detection technology."

"On July 1st, the ship departed from Hainan and entered the Philippines' Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) on the following day," he wrote.

The 12,000-ton CCG 5901 was later "radio challenged" by the PCG, which asked it to confirm its intentions and to remind it that it was operating within the EEZ, he added.

An exclusive economic zone is an area of the ocean "beyond a nation's territorial sea, within which a coastal nation has jurisdiction over both living and nonliving resources."

Tarriela wrote on Friday that the Chinese ship had been anchored at Escoda Shoal "for over two consecutive days" while "maintaining a close proximity" to a PCG vessel. He added that the distance between the ships was "less than 800 yards."

Tarriela later told a news forum that the Chinese vessel's moves were "an intimidation on the part of the China Coast Guard."

"We're not going to pull out and we're not going to be intimidated," he added.

Maritime run-ins between China and the Philippines are on the rise

China and the Philippines have had frequent confrontations around the Second Thomas Shoal, an atoll located within the exclusive economic zone.

Related stories

China claims sovereignty over the reef and most of the South China Sea, but an international tribunal ruled in 2016 that China's claims to waters within its " nine-dash line" had no legal basis .

The Philippines grounded a ship, the BRP Sierra Madre, on the reef in 1999 to state its own claims over the area.

But the Shoal remains what the Brussels-based think tank the International Crisis Group (ICG) has called a "dangerous flashpoint," as Chinese boats continually try to prevent efforts to resupply the grounded ship.

Earlier this month, the China Coast Guard blocked a resupply mission using "dangerous and deliberate use of water cannons, ramming, and blocking maneuvers," according to a statement provided to US Naval Institute News by a spokesperson for the Office of the Secretary of Defense.

Officials from China and the Philippines met on Tuesday and said they aimed to "rebuild confidence" to help manage maritime disputes.

But the Philippines' Department of Foreign Affairs stressed that it would be "relentless in protecting its interests and upholding its sovereignty, sovereign rights, and jurisdiction" in the South China Sea.

The ICG noted in May that "relations between the two countries in the maritime domain have never been as volatile as during the last seven months."

Watch: Inside the world's biggest cruise ship that just set sail

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Barstool Sports founder Dave Portnoy rescued by Coast Guard after his boat goes adrift off Nantucket

Barstool Sports founder Dave Portnoy was on a different kind of boat, a duck boat, during the Boston Celtics championship parade in June.

Barstool Sports founder Dave Portnoy was rescued by the US Coast Guard Monday after his boat went adrift in the waters off Nantucket, officials said.

Portnoy’s approximately 28-foot vessel “broke free of its mooring in Nantucket Harbor and was drifting through the area,” according to Lieutenant Samantha Corcoran, a spokesperson for the Coast Guard.

Personnel from US Coast Guard Station Brant Point “diverted from training and towed the vessel to its mooring,” Corcoran said.

Portnoy posted a video of himself talking about the incident on X, formerly known as Twitter, and said it happened while he was taking his mother out for a boat ride. After he unmoored the boat, he tried to turn on the engine, but realized there was no power.

“No power, no radio, no anchor, no nothing,” Portnoy said in the video. “Heavy, heavy winds. Next thing you know, Captain Dave is lost at sea. Just blowing. Trying not to crash into ships in the harbor.”

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Portnoy said he shot a flare gun into the air as a distress signal and yelled for help.

“Some girl in what I don’t know, looks like a rowboat, comes by Captain Dave, and I’m screaming, ‘Help! Captain Dave needs help!’” he said.

We almost lost Captain Dave to mother ocean today. Thank you to the #uscoastguard for saving Captain Dave's life. pic.twitter.com/hF5gYbmkSY — Dave Portnoy (@stoolpresidente) July 15, 2024

She climbed aboard Portnoy’s boat and radioed the Coast Guard for assistance.

Portnoy thanked the Coast Guard for getting him back to shore safely.

“We almost lost Captain Dave to mother ocean today,” Portnoy wrote on X. “Thank you to the #uscoastguard for saving Captain Dave’s life.”

The US Coast Guard responded to Portnoy’s post and gave a shout-out to Portnoy’s dog, Miss Peaches.

“You’re welcome, Dave,” Coast Guard officials wrote on X . “Tell Miss Peaches we said hi and remember to boat safe!”

Portnoy is a big fan of Nantucket, which he calls his “ favorite place on earth .” In 2016, he bought a $2 million home on the island, and has since traded up. He bought a waterfront estate on the island for $42 million last year.

I went from being able to afford renting for a day to a weekend to a week to a month to renting for the entire summer to buying a house to now buying a house beyond even my wildest imaginations. This is now my view. #DreamBig pic.twitter.com/Pt6XqCN7Hi — Dave Portnoy (@stoolpresidente) September 29, 2023

Coast Guard officials commended the Good Samaritan who helped Portnoy.

“We are glad that he used distressed signals and applaud the Good Samaritan for having a VHF radio ready to hail the Coast Guard,” Corcoran said in an email. “We advise the public to go out with various forms of communication, like a personal locator beacon and/or VHF radio, in case of an emergency. There is no such thing as being too prepared.”

Emily Sweeney can be reached at [email protected] . Follow her @emilysweeney and on Instagram @emilysweeney22 .

COMMENTS

  1. Sea Anchors & Drogues

    A sea anchor is meant to fix a boat in place, much like a conventional (non-floating) anchor. A drogue, on the other hand, generally goes over the stern. You use it to control speed and stabilize your course as you run downwind away from the seas. Both sea anchors and drogues work by creating drag.

  2. The Sea Anchor Technique

    A sea anchor, also known as a drift anchor or drogue, is a device used to stabilize a boat in heavy weather conditions. It is designed to create drag in the water, slowing the boat's drift and helping to maintain a desired heading. This can be particularly useful in situations where the wind and waves are pushing the boat off course or ...

  3. Storm Drogues and Sea Anchors, Explained

    A storm drogue is a device towed submerged from the stern to limit (but not stop) the boat's speed, and to keep the vessel's stern at a set angle to following seas. Conversely, a sea anchor is a device deployed from the bow to stop the boat's movement through the water, and to keep the boat's bow into oncoming waves.

  4. An Introduction To Sea Anchor Use

    The parachute sea anchor, also referred to as a para sea anchor or para-anchor, is a specially designed water parachute attached to an anchor rope deployed from the bow of a vessel. A parachute sea anchor is usually made from high-strength nylon or Dacron, and a typical para-anchor setup consists of the following: Durable 8-ounce nylon or ...

  5. What Size Sea Anchor Do I Need?

    Mathew F. The size of your sea anchor depends on your boat's size and weight. For parachute anchors, diameters range from 6-20 feet. For series drogues, size is determined by the number of drogues. More drogues or larger diameters create more drag, helping maintain boat position in various sea conditions.

  6. How to Deploy and Use a Sea Anchor or Drogue

    The trip line and floats go out first, remember to deploy sea anchors from the bow and drogues from the stern. Allow the trip line to drift out and clear. Toss the drift anchor in next, making sure to toss it into clear water. As the boat drifts away from the anchor, pay out about 50' of rode and snub the line with half a turn on the cleat ...

  7. Sea anchor

    An early wooden drogue. A sea anchor (also known as a parachute anchor, drift anchor, drift sock, para-anchor or boat brake) is a device that is streamed from a boat in heavy weather. Its purpose is to stabilize the vessel and to limit progress through the water.

  8. PS Advisor: Sea Anchor Sizing

    www.seaanchor.com) displacing about two times the boat's displacement," explained Whilldin. "A 12-foot Sea Anchor displaces 22,400 pounds of water; 15-foot, 43,800 pounds; and 18-foot, 75,700 pounds. It is the water mass which is holding the boat.". Practical Sailor. also spoke with Zack Smith of Fiorentino Para Anchors (www.paraanchor.com.

  9. How Anchors Work and All You Need to Know about Anchoring

    Drawing by Tosaka. The primary force holding an anchored ship in place is the weight of the chain on the bottom of the sea. The wind will push the boat away from the anchor and keep the chain in place. Most anchors have flukes designed to dig into the ground. If the anchor is in the correct position, it will dig in deeper when wind or waves put ...

  10. Selecting the Right Anchor Size

    Much to our surprise, the weight recommendations for the new designs, Rocna, Excel, Supreme, etc. are very similar to the weight recommendation for the older, traditional models, CQR, Delta, Bruce etc. In both cases, the recommendation for a 35-foot yacht is approximately a 30-pound anchor. The exceptions are aluminum anchors from Fortress and ...

  11. When To Use A Sea Anchor?

    A Sea Anchor and drogue are vital equipment that should be kept in a vessel that sails on open water. 🟠 A sea anchor will keep the boat pointing toward the waves. 🟠 A drogue slows the boat's passage and makes it more controllable. 🟠 Before deploying "in anger," practice placing the equipment out.

  12. 7 Best Sailboat Anchors

    1. Lewmar Galvanized Delta Sailing Anchor. (Best for Larger Boats) Although several modern types of sailboat anchors have taken the anchor industry by storm, some traditional anchor designs still hold their ground today and the Lewmar Galvanized Delta Sailing Anchor is one of them.

  13. Which drogue should you buy? 7 drogues on test

    The Lalizas Professional drogue was enormous compared to the others on test. But once it assumed the correct shape it stopped us completely, taking our 3.5 knots to nothing in seconds, which exerted 120kg on the line. At higher revs, it took us from 7 knots to 1.7 knots, putting a strain of 150kg on the line.

  14. How to Select the Right Type of Anchor

    Plow-shaped or grapnel-type anchors, with high structural strength to sustain the high point-loads, generally work the best. These anchors include the Claw, CQR, Delta, Rocna and Supreme. Shale, clay and grassy bottoms: Bottom types like these can pose a challenge to any type of anchor. For these types of bottoms, the weight of the anchor, more ...

  15. The 5 Best Sailboat Anchors

    The best sailboat anchors are 1. M1 Mantus Anchor, 2. Lewmar Claw Anchor, 3. Seachoice Utility Anchor, 4. Fortress FX-11 Anchor, 5. Rocna Anchor. Top Sailboat Anchors: ... The Fortress FX-11 anchor can be used in different marine locations including lakes, rivers and the sea. Sailboat sizes of between 28ft to 32ft can use the FX-11 anchor.

  16. Boat Anchoring Techniques Explained (Illustrated Guide)

    The basics of anchoring in calm conditions in an anchorage with good holding aren't difficult to master, and (link: /guides/how-to-anchor-a-boat-7-critical-steps-lake-river-sea text: you should start with basic anchoring techniques) if you haven't read it already and practiced setting your hook.

  17. 12 Best Sailboat Anchors for Any Sailor

    1. Rocna Vulcan Galvanized Anchor. One of the best sailboat anchors out there today based on being the best-selling anchor for yachts and workboats goes to the Rocna Vulcan Galvanized Anchor. As one of the pioneering brands for sailboat anchors, the Rocna Vulcan was able to transform from the original Rocna anchor to the most dependable, best ...

  18. PARA-ANCHOR by Fiorentino

    parachute style sea anchor. for over 60 years ! Established in 1958 on the West. Coast of the Americas, Fiorentino. has become a world leading authority and U.S. manufacturer for underwater parachute sea anchors and storm drogues. Available in all sizes for the recreational boater and marine. specialty market.

  19. The Tall Ships Races in Turku 18-21 July 2024

    City of Turku signed an anchor port agreement on Wednesday 17.7. with Sail Training International, which organizes The Tall Ships Races. ... Turku is the Baltic Sea's first anchor port designated by Sail Training International; 17.07.2024. The Tall Ships Races will be held in Turku every four years from now on - Turku is the Baltic Sea's ...

  20. Sea Anchor Match-up

    The 9-foot sea anchor kept aboard our test boat is set up with a 20-foot rode of half-inch, three-strand nylon, a primary float, and 50 feet of half-inch polypropylene trip line. (It's actually a drift-fishing setup for use when the waves don't exceed five feet.) We used this setup as the first stage of our test for the 9-foot sea anchors.

  21. Dave Portnoy Rescued by the Coast Guard After He Was 'Lost at Sea'

    Dave Portnoy of Barstool Sports is seen in attendance during the UFC 281 event at Madison Square Garden on November 12, 2022 in New York City - Photo by Jeff Bottari/Zuffa LLC. Additionally, the U ...

  22. The flag of Elektrostal, Moscow Oblast, Russia which I bought there

    For artists, writers, gamemasters, musicians, programmers, philosophers and scientists alike! The creation of new worlds and new universes has long been a key element of speculative fiction, from the fantasy works of Tolkien and Le Guin, to the science-fiction universes of Delany and Asimov, to the tabletop realm of Gygax and Barker, and beyond.

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  24. 628DirtRooster

    Welcome to the 628DirtRooster website where you can find video links to Randy McCaffrey's (AKA DirtRooster) YouTube videos, community support and other resources for the Hobby Beekeepers and the official 628DirtRooster online store where you can find 628DirtRooster hats and shirts, local Mississippi honey and whole lot more!

  25. The Unique Burial of a Child of Early Scythian Time at the Cemetery of

    Burial 5 was the most unique, it was found in a coffin made of a larch trunk, with a tightly closed lid. Due to the preservative properties of larch and lack of air access, the coffin contained a well-preserved mummy of a child with an accompanying set of grave goods. The interred individual retained the skin on his face and had a leather ...

  26. Elektrostal

    In 1938, it was granted town status. [citation needed]Administrative and municipal status. Within the framework of administrative divisions, it is incorporated as Elektrostal City Under Oblast Jurisdiction—an administrative unit with the status equal to that of the districts. As a municipal division, Elektrostal City Under Oblast Jurisdiction is incorporated as Elektrostal Urban Okrug.

  27. Beijing's 'Monster' Coastguard Ship Dropped Anchor in Philippines EEZ

    Beijing's 'monster ship,' the world's largest coastguard vessel, dropped anchor in the South China Sea Cameron Manley 2024-07-07T13:50:26Z

  28. Dave Portnoy says he was nearly 'lost at sea' before coast guard rescue

    In a social media video, Portnoy said he was rescued by the U.S. Coast Guard after he became stranded on his boat without power, radio or an anchor while attempting to set sail in Nantucket, Mass.

  29. Dave Portnoy boat goes adrift, he's rescued by U.S. Coast Guard

    After he unmoored the boat, he tried to turn on the engine, but realized there was no power. "No power, no radio, no anchor, no nothing," Portnoy said in the video. "Heavy, heavy winds.