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Slide 1

How to Cure a Ghost

  • ISBN: 9781419737565
  • Publication Date: September 24, 2019

how to cure a ghost

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A poetry compilation recounting a woman’s journey from self-loathing to self-acceptance, confusion to clarity, and bitterness to forgiveness

Following in the footsteps of such category killers as Milk and Honey and Whiskey Words & a Shovel I , Fariha Róisín’s poetry book is a collection of her thoughts as a young, queer, Muslim femme navigating the difficulties of her intersectionality. Simultaneously, this compilation unpacks the contentious relationship that exists between Róisín and her mother, her platonic and romantic heartbreaks, and the cognitive dissonance felt as a result of being so divided among her broad spectrum of identities.

 "When I first encountered Fariha’s writing, I let out a sigh of relief. Was it refreshing? Yes. But there was something more. Her words allow us to feel visible. Fariha’s writing has the power to heal and transform. She pulls you into her stories until you’re at the edge of your seat, emphatically rooting for her subjects." Rupi Kaur —
“A moving poetry collection by a queer Muslim writer exploring all the facets of her identity.” Domino —
“[Roisin’s] writing is intensely vulnerable and through revealing her own experience she reflects so many others.” Bustle —
“…a collection of poems that aims to heal..." Vogue online —
“…heart-aching and emotional while offering a sense of hope in a world that desperately needs it.” Little Infinite —
“ In these short and potent stanzas she makes it clear that while she’s been able to lay down the ghosts that have haunted her own self-worth, loving herself back to health after the mental and physical exhaustion of weathering constant aggressions is a long and continuous process.” Teen Vogue —
  • Imprint: Abrams Image
  • Trim Size: 5 x 7
  • Page Count: 160
  • Illustrations: 10 4-color illustrations
  • Rights: World/All

Fariha Róisín is an Australian-Canadian writer based in Brooklyn. Her writing often explores Muslim identity, race, pop culture, and film. It also examines the intersection of queerness and being a femme of color while navigating a white world.  

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Fariha Róisín on the Healing Power of Poetry

By Christian Allaire

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Fariha Róisín ’s piquant essays explore racism, faith, queer identity, and misogyny. Now the Brooklyn-based writer is diving back into these ideas via a brand-new medium: poetry. On September 24, she releases How to Cure a Ghost , a collection of poems that aims to heal—both herself, from the traumas she’s experienced as a queer Muslim woman, and readers who have experienced similar types of oppression, whether sexually, physically, or emotionally. She calls it a book for survivors. “The ‘ghost’ is so much,” Róisín tells Vogue of the title’s meaning. “The ghost is colonization, my mother, white supremacy, abuse, ancestral trauma. Even though all of these themes are broad, they really come back to human pain. We’re all suffering in a way, so how do we heal? We heal by naming the ghost.”

Róisín is the definition of a multihyphenate; she writes fiction, does astrology readings, models, and is dabbling in upcoming TV and film projects as well. But she felt the new lane of poetry was an illuminating fit for the subject matter she wished to touch on. “In a weird way, poetry is a canvas that allows you to be hyperreal,” she says. “Because it is so beautiful, people are much more willing to accept it. There’s a digestibleness to poetry that creates a trust with the reader.”

Fariha Róisín on the Healing Power of Poetry

Over the course of five years, she delved into a variety of personal experiences for these poems, from being objectified for her race—“Or when they tell you you’re pretty/for an Indian girl,” she writes in “The Many Descriptions of Being Brown”—to being mansplained to by white men. The resulting poems are certainly beautiful, but the topics at the heart of the book are, as Róisín says, heavy. In “What 9/11 Did to Us,” she recalls her experiences with Islamophobia as a Muslim woman: “Do you know how many times/My friends have said offensive things to me?/Asked me questions that have made my skin scream.” It’s a tension she has been dealing with for a while, she says: “For the longest time, I don’t think I even felt comfortable declaring that I was Muslim. That was so hidden; it was such an embarrassing thing. In my early 20s, I really had to reconcile that and say, ‘No, this is my identity.’ I had to learn to feel good in it.”

Róisín also approaches many of the darker themes in the book with humor—something that, like poetry, can be an effective way to grapple with emotions that might otherwise be too daunting. “Humor is such a fantastic tool to get under people’s skin in a way that they didn’t even expect,” she says. “Great comedy just hits you in the gut.” In “All the Things We’re Actually Thinking When Men Think We’re Staring,” she turns the tables on objectification courtesy of acute observations like, “Definitely a serial killer” or “Lol that guy looks like an ugly Adam Driver?” In her one-sentence poem “To the Aunties,” she also takes aim at toxic family members, writing, “Watch your own children first, innit.” (She tells me the original poem was just going to read “Fuck you.”)

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Ahead of the release of How to Cure a Ghost , Róisín shared an exclusive new poem with Vogue , titled “Bad Men Keep Bad Men Keep Bad Men Cool.” Her exploration of men not always being who they seem is a perennial one, but lands amid the #MeToo era : “We live in such a society of rampant misogyny,” she says. “We see this everywhere; with trans women and aboriginal women in Canada being the most murdered group of people. Women are victims of incredible violence in this world and it’s just accepted.”

Below, read her poem in full.

“Bad Men Keep Bad Men Keep Bad Men Cool”

i thought bad men hid in woods, disguised in wolf costumes bloodthirsty strangers with candy hollering like dogs outside schools slipping hands up short dresses watching asses rumble as they shake up stairs using handycams to capture a cheek all bravado, cum-stained car seats. i thought bad men were senators, politicians trump and fox news “reporters,” anti-Semites, neo-Nazis, punch him in the face, richard spencer, religious zealots, zionists trans-misogynists, homophobes mansplainers— i heard egon schiele was abusive, and l. frank baum and h. p. lovecraft hated black people and, oh, don’t even get me started on “male novelists.” heathcliff and rochester both had rage issues— the brontës knew. i thought bad men looked like willem dafoe or crispin glover in charlie’s angels ; the dark-haired bad boys who do backflips. motorcycle jackets, badlands killing sprees across, and down all manner of highways gilded with angled noses, flared nostrils lips that would embrace you, as if swallowing you whole, exterminating your existence through a kiss; a dementor draped in flesh. i didn’t think bad men would mask themselves as good men. that they would never announce themselves as bad, or merely present themselves as good—until it no longer served them. pathetic until the end, i didn’t think a bad man would take away my virginity with a throbbing blunt thud never call, or get me pregnant, or tell me that i’m a dramatic cunt that all kinds of women get abortions, “it’s not a big deal.” bad men do what bad men did for centuries because that’s what bad men like bad men do. they walk away from the dangerous swamps of indignation they create, the cuts, broken kneecaps, the crazy they mythologized, then nurtured, gaslighting slow death, the ugly self-hate they weave into bodies, they deem weak. belonging to no one. and once you learn what bad men do you carry that uncertainty along with all your other baggage, looking for a sign like a flashing neon light bulb

this man is bad

and even then you only barely begin to understand even though you find you almost always knew. all along goddamn: just trust your gut, bitch.

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How to Cure a Ghost Paperback – Illustrated, 24 September 2019

Purchase options and add-ons.

  • Print length 160 pages
  • Language English
  • Publisher Abrams Image
  • Publication date 24 September 2019
  • Reading age 13 years and up
  • Dimensions 12.83 x 1.65 x 17.78 cm
  • ISBN-10 1419737562
  • ISBN-13 978-1419737565
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Praise for How to Cure a Ghost

"When I first encountered Fariha’s writing, I let out a sigh of relief. Was it refreshing? Yes. But there was something more. Her words allow us to feel visible. Fariha’s writing has the power to heal and transform. She pulls you into her stories until you’re at the edge of your seat, emphatically rooting for her subjects.”

- Rupi Kaur, bestselling author of Milk and Honey and The Sun and Her Flowers

Inside you will beautiful watercolour illustrations by Monica Ramos

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Being in Your Body: A Journal for Self-Love and Body Positivity

Also available to buy alongside How to Cure a Ghost is Being in Your Body, a beautiful journal devoted to the practice of thinking positively about the body. Fariha Róisín prompts women to explore a new language for talking about their physical selves.

Her inspiring words serve as a springboard for using this journal as a love letter to one's own body one filled with compassion and joy. The journal features illustrations throughout by Monica Ramos.

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About the author, product details.

  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Abrams Image; Main edition (24 September 2019)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • Paperback ‏ : ‎ 160 pages
  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 1419737562
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-1419737565
  • Reading age ‏ : ‎ 13 years and up
  • Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 12.83 x 1.65 x 17.78 cm
  • 96 in Poetry About Family
  • 109 in LGBTQ+ Poetry
  • 381 in LGBTQ+ Biographies (Books)

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Fariha róisín.

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Fariha Róisín Tells Us How To Cure A Ghost

Fariha Roisin How to Cure a Ghost

Poetry that fearlessly and vulnerably addresses issues of identity and womanhood? Meet Fariha Róisín… your new favorite poet!

In today’s world, we value the honest, the raw, and the real. Whether it comes down to the way we connect with one another or the books and social media we consume, so many of us are looking for something with substance and vulnerability. Fariha Róisín, an Australian-Canadian poet, offers this in her work.

Her book, How to Cure a Ghost , explores race, gender, family, queerness, and life in a whitewashed world. It is heart-aching and emotional while offering a sense of hope in a world that desperately needs it. Displayed alongside gorgeous artwork — vibrant bodies, shapes, and animals — by Monica Ramos, this book feels intimate and alive. Really, it feels sacred.

Content & Themes

Without even reading Fariha Róisín’s book, one can glance at her Instagram account and get a sense of the themes that matter to her. From politics to healing through poetry to body dysmorphia (she also wrote, Being In Your Body , a journal for people with body dysmorphia), Róisín is here to turn the darkness into beauty. Her poetry takes that to the next level.

How to Cure a Ghost is first and foremost a book of self-healing, but it explores this through a core theme: identity. What does it mean to be someone who grieves, who has a body, who loves, who is feared, and who fears the world around them?

She writes, ‘How do I ask to be saved/in a world like this?” It’s a question that asks a lot of its readers — and in a necessary way.

View this post on Instagram feeling very emotional and very grateful to be in Vogue today. excited that my poem “Bad Men Keep Bad Men Keep Bad Men Cool” has an exclusive feature that you can read ahead of the book coming out tomorrow! thank you so much to sweet @chrisjallaire who I adore for this profile and for @sylviethecamera who captured these incredible images 🙂 link in bio—ty! if this resonates please support and buy my book 🤠😇 (crying at the line “I had to feel good in it” shout-out to all the Muslims that feel this, I love you) A post shared by Fariha Róisín (@fariha_roisin) on Sep 23, 2019 at 9:51am PDT

Voice & Tone

From the start of the book, the reader is dropped right into an intense world. The first line, “I built myself up” feels strong and alive, furious and courageous — and yet you get the sense that perhaps, yes, there is a fall.

The book doesn’t cocoon its reader in a soft, dreamy palace of poetics. It doesn’t bother with metaphor after metaphor. Rather, Róisín gives it to the reader clearly — as if she’s dredging up memories and screaming out into the dark sky. The poems are testimonies — to herself, to her memories, to her own need to be rid of the ache.

Her poetic voice is honest and upfront and gets right to the core of an idea quickly. There are gems and moments of beauty and unique language encased throughout the text, though. It’s poetry, alright. It’s just not concerned with dancing around the issue.

There are lines like “men only win/because they lie” and “i remember no peace at home/i remember no silence” alongside the more obscure, “like a lark singing sweet hymns in the summer” or “an energetic tsunami/vital like lifeblood.”

View this post on Instagram In one month exactly my first book comes out. I can hardly believe it. This has been an intense labor of love and hard work and vision and I’m so excited to share it with you. Right now if you buy on Indigo you can get 40% off of my book (and select other new releases; link in bio) and the first 1000 people who pre-order (anywhere, not just off of Indigo) will receive my favorite prints from the book (these are some of them!) illustrated by the imitable @moniiqwa (who also took these photos!) Thanks for being on this journey with me. Please share and spread the word, especially if my work has resonated with you. I need all the support I can get 🖤 shukriya 🖤 A post shared by Fariha Róisín (@fariha_roisin) on Aug 25, 2019 at 9:25am PDT

This is an engine of a book. Each poem roars into the next, pushing the reader a little closer to each poem’s story, to the book’s whole message, to the voice within that says, “I can relate to this in some way.” How To Cure A Ghost is a book that wants you to look at your ancestral traumas and deep fears and needs for love. It wants to confront systemic oppression. It wants growth and self-love.

How To Cure A Ghost is a book that wants you to look at your ancestral traumas and deep fears and needs for love. It wants to confront systemic oppression. It wants growth and self-love.

This book makes demands. It wants you to peer into the abyss and find a strength. When she writes, “Rumi was not made for white/people’s adjunct spirituality,” you feel it.

View this post on Instagram such an earnest fa look, lol. here I am for @goodeeworld … they photographed me at home, and also let me write about the landscape of our minds and well-being—and how objects and design can nurture the soul… for someone like me building a home (for myself) has helped me process childhood trauma and feelings of unlovability. i’m learning to nurture myself, finally. link in their bio ⭐️ 📸 @oumaymabtanfous special thanks to @tamyemmapepin 🌸🌸🌸 A post shared by Fariha Róisín (@fariha_roisin) on Jun 2, 2019 at 10:59am PDT

The book ends with, “your emotional destiny is to support/those you love/said a healer, once/i love myself, i say now/and, so, my emotional destiny/is to support myself, always.” Beside the poem is an illustration, drenched in deep pink, that depicts two girls, side by side, part of one another, surrounded by stars. A lion holds them up. They are lifted high.

This poem, we know, is for the poet herself. It’s a reclamation, a self-celebration, a goddamned moment of peace. But it’s for us, too, in a way.

And it reminds you that this is something you deserve to. After all the excavation and pain and fear and trauma, your destiny is to love yourself.

To stay up-to-date, make sure to keep an eye out for more of little infinite’s featured content as we celebrate poetry, books, and this beautiful hot mess we call life on  Instagram  and  Twitter . 

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how to cure a ghost

Fergana Valley. Cross road between Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan & Tajikistan.

I woke up with a headache today.

I rarely have them but today it felt throbbing, like a raging, erratic pulse against my temples. I’m about two months into a pretty horrifying experience. At first I thought complaining would be uncouth because since I was a child I always opted for the happier narrative and maybe that’s why I’m still here… because I could wield magic and mystery out of pretty shit things. Maybe that’s why I’m a storyteller, I’ve needed my own to save my life. Survival takes a wild imagination.

I’ve been two months into a legal process over Who Is Wellness For? because I name my abuser and you know… that’s defamation. Every step of this path I’ve cried, but I’ve continued with a resolve, frankly, I didn’t know I had. Yet, through it all, I’ve wondered: why the fuck am I doing this? Is this fight worth it?

I used to feel really angry that throughout my life I’ve perpetually felt let down by others. Like it’s hard for me to rely on people because when I finally do I feel like the rug is pulled out from underneath me. I’m trying to reframe this and hold the relationships that do nurture me as evidence that I’m loved… but whenever it happens again, this pattern, it takes me back to the wound. It took me 3 years to realize I didn’t fully trust my therapist, I didn’t really believe that she had any real investment in me, so though I went to every session, and even opened up and had deep experiences… I always felt like one day she’d discard me. I feel this way about a lot of people. I often get thrown under the bus because people don’t actually realize how sensitive I am and that how I cope with this big scary life that I’ve been given is by not being in the world, completely. I exist oustide of it.

On March 11th I went on my first vacation of my life (technical second, but the first one was from NY to LA, so you know it doesn’t count) because previously I didn’t have money and I couldn’t justify a holiday. Yes can you tell I’m a traumatized child of immigrants who also happens to be a Capricorn... so it all comes back to productivity and value. Guilty. Besides, I wanted a real vacation (code: I wanted fancy meals and nice sheets) so it was just never an option. Anyway, I’m finally able to afford one, the timing is just right, and on the plane minutes before takeoff I realize I have an email from my book agent. In the email it explains that my UK publisher has decided that because they don’t have sufficient evidence to protect me if I’m sued, they will no longer be publishing my book. This is after a pretty lengthy and arduous journey of being legally hazed.

The series of events are so absurd, like an Almódovar movie, that I am left feeling completely numb on a plane to a vacation I no longer want to go on. I could barely move the whole flight. I felt broken, shattered in two and ugly cried in my mask in the bathroom so I could just let out the feelings of abandonment and betrayal that were wrapped around my throat. Thankfully I was saved by the film Limbo by Ben Sharrock, and consequelty laughed and sobbed at the injustice and comedy of the world the whole plane ride. But there has been no real consolation for this pain. There has been nothing to make me feel less discarded. It’ just a reality I’ve had to accept.

One of my beloveds, Zeba, who has been a phenomal rock for me at this time, told me to watch Rising Phoenix, the Evan Rachel Wood documentary about Marilyn Manson, last week. If you didn’t know, Wood has named Manson as her abuser who tortured and raped her for years, and groomed her to be his plaything is his sick dark twisted fantasy. Men make art about hating women and then when women come out and say something… people don’t believe them. Can you imagine? I can’t believe Manson made us think he was deep when this pathetic exhibitionist only wanted fame to become the sadist he glorifies in his head. The narrative he has created of “Marilyn Manson” is clearly an avatar birthed to support the monstrosity he feels himself to be. Imagine if more men… I don’t know… sought therapy rather than create alteregos that only support the sadness they can’t feel and nor express. Also, the height of power for so many men seems to be owning others (usually women) as slaves to fuck and conquer and debase. How fucking embarassing.

It’s pretty wild, also, that this man has on camera said he’s going to kill Wood, and legions of people think she was asking for everything she experienced, even though she was just 18 when she was taken by this man. It’s pretty crazy to witness how much people hate women. Grooming is an important word and one that isn’t given enough explanation in the genesis and cultivation of violence and abuse against another. In fact I would say grooming is the most important part, because this is where you are convinced into believing (because they tell you so again and again) that you deserve exactly what’s coming for you. Grooming is the process where you are forced to believe lies about yourself, about the situation, that inevitably makes you stay in the darkness and not trust what you know your body is telling you.

A few days ago I was told that my US publisher is doubling down after the UK’s decision and that they need consent from certain members of my family that they previously didn’t. The book goes into print next week. So I’ve been given the rushed assignment (literally they gave me 4 days that was extended to a week) of breaking up my family by asking them to consent to a book they’d much rather not think about. It’s always been life or death for me, there was never any middle ground. So much has felt unsafe for so long and in order to live I can’t keep dwelling in uncertainty.

As God always does, God spoke to me, a day after I completely shut down once I received this news. I kept thinking of the Bengali lawyer who represented my UK publisher and how she kept asking, “Aren’t you afraid what the community will think?” Can you imagine? Every single person I’ve worked with in this process of making this book is either failing me or has failed me and it’s dawning on me now how little people truly care about survivors. And how little they know what to actually do with us. But God spoke to me, and reminded me that this is my path. My therapist recently reminded me that I am Diana, the goddess that protects the poor and fights for justice. My entire life has been dedicated to this end. It’s not going to stop now. I’m fighting for something so much bigger than me.

What does it mean to be believed when you won’t protect me? What the fuck do I care about being believed if you’re sticking a knife through my back and cutting off my oxygen as you tell me you believe me. The censorship, the silencing, is real and it is horrific. And here’s the gag: every single person I’ve worked with on this book has been a woman. My own abuser is a woman, so when are we actually going to talk about these things? When are we going to take accountability for ourselves, and each other? Throughout this process nobody on my team has checked in to ask me how I’m doing, almost two months of this shit… and even in the process of writing this book no-one ever checked into say, “Hey, this is heavy, are you OK?” What does it mean to believe women when you don’t even have the human decency to not treat us like commodities? I’ve never felt more dehumanized in my life. The things people will do for capitalism, the things people will defend because “It’s the way things are.”

I have been astounded, but I’m observing everything.

I’m lucid and I’m taking notes.

The care I need is so simple and I now gravitate toward the relationships that can hold all of me, all this, and just let me be. Relationships where I don’t need to decode myself. Let me disappear, let me be playful, let me be blunt. I just want to be loved for who I am, but so many people want me, need me, to be something for them without considering what I need in the equation of the friendship…. and I’m totally moving away from that kind of dynamic. The most astounding part of all of this is that my spirit is intact but I think it’s because I’m listening to my needs, first. Because this ordeal has really shown me that no-one will prioritize me, not even my own team that I pay, who make money off of me, and that what I need to do for my own self care is be conscious and cognizant of my needs at all times and name them. Now I pay attention to who has patience for my needs, because the truth is, I always have patience for other’s. Even stranger’s. I just am that person. I’m naming that as well. I’m naming all my gifts more and more, at the very least to myself, because who else will, if I don’t?

Last night I taught a spring solstice class for some of my former writing students. It was deeply intimate and I realized how extraordinary it is that amongst so much unsafety of my life, with little-to-no support, I’ve been able to create such strong and ardent connections with people who really see me, and who I really see. That there are all these extraordinary, brilliant other writers that I get to spend time with, and who all feel I have wisdom to share. I’m so used to being extracted from that healthy relationships where I’m not being fed off of is still a new and exciting thing, so it’s helped me ensure my boundaries in a way that feels safe. I’m grateful for all those who have been holding me through this and not needing anything from me. The friends that want to nourish me without any expectation because they trust we are in a symbiotic relationship. These things have been necessary.

I need so much love and the beauty is that my heart is so open and full to recieve it. That’s all I want, it’s all I’m hungry for, other people’s kindness and care. It’s incredible that I’m not shutting down against others, that I’m still seeking joy and laughter, while still naming the pain, the grief. I’m allowing myself to move through it like waves and I’m asking for what I need… and moving towards those who can give it to me, freely, without condition. I’m letting go of the people who are not showing up, or can’t, and trusting that if a relationship is meant to be it will come back around. I think that’s the biggest thing that’s changed for me in these last few months… I no longer resent the aloneness of my specific journey. I’m accepting it’s taking me exactly where I need to be and that through the process I’m becoming myself everyday.

So I watch comedy. Stand up is life—I crave stand up and comedy the most because I need to laugh. The times are dark, but there’s comedy abound. There’s something actually about being in a dark room, with others, and sharing in a moment of a laughter so full that it shakes the audience into a sputtering hysteria. Feeling emotions, being with them, like the rollercoaster that they are, has been a strange awakening. I allow myself to disassociate (this week in my writing class we were discussing the sometimes necessity of disassocation, plot twist) but I always come back to myself. I come back to myself because I am lucky to trust, and to know, that I am safe in my own body. I come back to myself because I am worth returning back to.

I would really appreciate your support by pre-ordering Who Is Wellness For? The only solace I get for this fight is the hope that this book will reach many. Please ask your local bookstores and libraries to get the book and ask your universities to bring me in so I can speak. I will not be silenced. Also please become a paid subscriber to this newsletter (the button below) it really, really helps me make the work I need to make. Thank you for your support.

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Bravely Second: How to Cure Ghost

Get rid of that spooky status effect.

Twinfinite Staff Writer

Ghost is one of the many status effects that can be inflicted on your party in Bravely Second. It’s a particularly nasty one as it restricts whichever character it affects from using anything but magic. At the same time any characters afflicted can’t be targeted by enemies, but if all four characters are put under the status it’s game over. Ghost also persists after battle until you cure it, and can’t be fixed normally with a remedy or by sleeping at an inn.

There are three different ways that you can cure Ghost in the game. The first is by using the consumable item called “Magic Bottle.” These can be purchased in the town of Florem, the city of flowers. Another way to cure Ghost is by bathing in the hot springs in either the city of Yunohana or aboard your ship, the Rubadub.

The third way to cure Ghost is with the Patissier job. At level seven this job unlocks an ability called “Digestion.” This ability can dispel Ghost and other status-raising effects.

Have you run into any problems with the Ghost status effect in Bravely Second? What status effects do you find the most bothersome? Let us know down in the comments.

About the author

Twinfinite Staff Writer

Hayes Madsen

A connoisseur of all things RPG related, and always looking for the artistic expression in gaming. His love of Gundam is only matched by his love of Pizza. Playing Games Since: 1991 Favorite Genres: RPGs, JRPGs, Strategy,

More Stories by Hayes Madsen

Extraterrestrial life in Miami? No, police say viral video shows human being | Fact check

how to cure a ghost

The claim: Video shows aliens at Miami mall

A Jan. 6 Instagram video ( direct link , archive link ) shows an aerial view of numerous police vehicles with their emergency lights flashing parked outside a Miami shopping center.

"We got it y'all," says a man who appears in the video, pointing to a shadowy figure moving across the screen. "Y'all see it? I know you all see it."

The video's on-screen caption reads, "Footage of aliens in miami."

The Instagram post was liked more than 2,000 times in three days. Similar videos of the incident have been shared thousands of times across social media platforms.

More from the Fact-Check Team: How we pick and research claims | Email newsletter | Facebook page

Our rating: False

The video shows a person walking, not extraterrestrial life, a Miami police spokesperson said. The significant police presence was for juveniles who reportedly set off fireworks on Jan. 1 at Bayside Marketplace in Miami.

No aliens at Miami mall, police say

Rafael Horta , a Miami police spokesperson, said the claim that the video shows aliens at the shopping center is false.

"It's actually just a person walking with a shadow," Horta said in a Jan. 5 Instagram video posted by the Miami Police Department. "So I can confirm to you all here today right now that there are no aliens in Miami in Bayside Marketplace – at the moment."

Police went to the mall Jan. 1 in response to a group of about 50 juveniles who had been shooting fireworks at people, Horta said. Officers had trouble containing the group and called for citywide reinforcements, resulting in a significant police presence, he said.

Fact check : No, episode of 'The Simpsons' did not predict solar superstorm in 2024

Michael Vega , another police spokesperson, told CBS News Miami there were no aliens, airport closures or power outages connected to the events at the shopping center

The Miami Herald reported four teens were arrested as a result of the incident, which involved fireworks, riots and fights.

The Instagram user who shared the video did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

PolitiFact also debunked the claim.

Our fact-check sources:

  • Miami Police Department, Jan. 5, Instagram video
  • CBS News Miami, Jan. 5, Rumors of 'shadow aliens' at Bayside Marketplace go viral after large fight among teens creates chaos
  • Miami Herald, Jan. 6, Miami cops arrest teens after fireworks, riots, fights erupted at Bayside Marketplace

Thank you for supporting our journalism. You can subscribe to our print edition, ad-free app or e-newspaper here .

USA TODAY is a verified signatory of the International Fact-Checking Network, which requires a demonstrated commitment to nonpartisanship, fairness and transparency. Our fact-check work is supported in part by a grant from Meta .

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I’ve had tinnitus for 20 years. Here’s a promising solution

Years of sweaty gigs have left an ever-ringing ‘ghost wasp’ in jamie fullerton’s ears. scientists think their app could put millions like him on the path to a cure.

The phantom noise is a harrowing reality for the 1.5 million Britons with severe tinnitus

‘Y ou’re not alone.” My iPhone is speaking to me in a friendly female Australian accent. “You’re capable of overcoming anything you set your mind to, so take your time, don’t give up, and if you’re patient with yourself, progress will come.” Along with this calming voice, I’m hearing a high-frequency ringing like a television on standby. It isn’t coming from my iPhone, though. I’ve been hearing it for 20 years. A never-ending “eeeeeeeeee”.

I’ve had tinnitus since I was 21, a condition that means you hear “phantom” noise not created by external sources. It’s often a constant ring but for some it’s a hum, whoosh or buzz. It can arise from injuries and trauma but is more often caused by exposure to loud noise, from

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IMAGES

  1. Book review: How to Cure a Ghost by Fariha Róisín

    how to cure a ghost

  2. How To Cure A Ghost by Fariha Rósín REVIEW

    how to cure a ghost

  3. Book review: How to Cure a Ghost by Fariha Róisín

    how to cure a ghost

  4. How to Cure a Ghost by Fariha Róisín

    how to cure a ghost

  5. How to Cure a Ghost (Paperback)

    how to cure a ghost

  6. How to Cure a Ghost by Fariha Roisin

    how to cure a ghost

VIDEO

  1. Bloody Mannequin Arm

  2. How to 🛑stop ghost 👻

  3. The cure

  4. Ghost

  5. The Hungry Ghost The Cure RAH 2014 [Live]

  6. Ghost

COMMENTS

  1. How To Cure A Ghost

    How To Cure A Ghost is a book of poems by FARIHA RÓISÍN that explores her personal and ancestral trauma, and her quest to cure the ghosts of white supremacy, her mother, the patriarchy, Islamophobia and more. The book is a conversation starter for survivors of abuse, trauma and body dysmorphia, and a journal for women to work through their own body issues.

  2. How to Cure a Ghost by Fariha Róisín

    How to Cure a Ghost Fariha Róisín, Mónica Ramos (Illustrator) 3.58 2,512 ratings337 reviews A poetry compilation recounting a woman's journey from self-loathing to self-acceptance, confusion to clarity, and bitterness to forgiveness

  3. How to Cure a Ghost by Róisín, Fariha

    How to Cure a Ghost. Paperback - Illustrated, September 24, 2019. Following in the footsteps of such category killers as Milk and Honey and Whiskey Words & a Shovel I, Fariha Róisín's poetry book is a collection of her thoughts as a young, queer, Muslim femme navigating the difficulties of her intersectionality.

  4. Book review: How to Cure a Ghost by Fariha Róisín

    How to Cure a Ghost explores a young woman's journey from self-loathing to self-acceptance, and deserves to be as widely read as possible. I'm 50+ books into my Goodreads Challenge this year and this is easily the best thing I've read so far. Buy How to Cure a Ghost on Amazon And that's not all - there's a journal too!

  5. Fariha Róisín (Author of How to Cure a Ghost)

    Combine EditionsFariha Róisín's books. Average rating: 3.63 · 4,377 ratings · 652 reviews · 6 distinct works • Similar authors. How to Cure a Ghost. by. Fariha Róisín, Mónica Ramos (Illustrator) 3.58 avg rating — 2,508 ratings — published 2019 — 5 editions. Want to Read.

  6. How to Cure a Ghost Kindle Edition

    Simultaneously, this compilation unpacks the contentious relationship that exists between RoÌ?isiÌ?n and her mother, her platonic and romantic heartbreaks, and the cognitive dissonance felt as a result of being so divided among her broad spectrum of identities. Read more Print length 160 pages Language English Sticky notes

  7. How to Cure a Ghost|Paperback

    How to Cure a Ghost by Fariha Roisin, Monica Ramos (Illustrator) Write a review Paperback $15.99 Paperback $15.99 Audio MP3 on CD $14.99 View All Available Formats & Editions SHIP THIS ITEM Qualifies for Free Shipping Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for delivery by Wednesday, December 6 Instant Purchase PICK UP IN STORE

  8. How To Cure A Ghost

    I'm working through it as an act of healing. An exploration of all the ghosts that haunt me. I'm working through it as an act of healing. Click to read How To Cure A Ghost, by Fariha Róisín, a Substack publication with tens of thousands of subscribers.

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    How to Cure a Ghost Audible Audiobook - Unabridged Fariha Róisín (Author), Fariha Roisin (Narrator), Audible Studios (Publisher) & 0 more 4.6 4.6 out of 5 stars 242 ratings

  10. How to Cure a Ghost (Paperback)

    How to Cure a Ghost By Fariha Róisín Illustrator Monica Ramos ISBN: 9781419737565 Publication Date: September 24, 2019 Format: Paperback Price: $15.99 Quantity: Add to Cart Also available from: Amazon Barnes & Noble Books-A-Million Bookshop Powells !ndigo Description Details Author Bio

  11. Fariha Róisín on the Healing Power of Poetry

    On September 24, she releases How to Cure a Ghost, a collection of poems that aims to heal—both herself, from the traumas she's experienced as a queer Muslim woman, and readers who have...

  12. Readers who enjoyed How to Cure a Ghost

    Readers who enjoyed. How to Cure a Ghost. by Fariha Róisín. 3.58 avg. rating · 2,352 Ratings. A poetry compilation recounting a woman's journey from self-loathing to self-acceptance, confusion to clarity, and bitterness to forgiveness. Following in the footsteps of such category killers as Milk …. Want to Read.

  13. How to Cure a Ghost a book by Fariha Róisín and Monica Ramos

    A poetry compilation recounting a woman's journey from self-loathing to self-acceptance, confusion to clarity, and bitterness to forgiveness Following in the footsteps of such category killers as Milk and Honey and Whiskey Words & a Shovel I, Fariha Róisín's poetry book is a collection of her thoughts as a young, queer, Muslim femme navigating the difficulties of her intersectionality ...

  14. How To Cure A Ghost by Fariha Rósín REVIEW

    Alice Thomas · September 25, 2019. Fariha Rósín's debut poetry collection 'how to cure a ghost' is a journey 158 pages long. Its purpose is a personal exploration of identity, especially ...

  15. Fariha Róisín

    Róisín has published a book of poetry entitled How To Cure A Ghost (Abrams), a journal called Being In Your Body (Abrams), and a novel named Like A Bird (Unnamed Press) which was named one of the Best Books of 2020 by NPR, Globe and Mail, Harper's Bazaar, a must-read by Buzzfeed News and received a starred review by the Library Journal.

  16. How to Cure a Ghost

    How to Cure a Ghost. Paperback - Illustrated, 24 September 2019. A poetry compilation recounting a woman's journey from self-loathing to self-acceptance, confusion to clarity, and bitterness to forgiveness Following in the footsteps of such category killers as Milk and Honey and Whiskey Words & a Shovel I, Fariha Ro´isi´n's poetry book ...

  17. Fariha Róisín Tells Us How To Cure A Ghost

    How to Cure a Ghost is first and foremost a book of self-healing, but it explores this through a core theme: identity. What does it mean to be someone who grieves, who has a body, who loves, who is feared, and who fears the world around them? She writes, 'How do I ask to be saved/in a world like this?"

  18. How to Cure a Ghost by Fariha R?is?n (Read by)

    Add to Cart Add this copy of How to Cure a Ghost to cart. $3.37, like new condition, Sold by ThriftBooks-Baltimore rated 5.0 out of 5 stars, ships from Halethorpe, MD, UNITED STATES, published 2019 by Harry N. Abrams.

  19. How to Cure a Ghost

    About the author (2019) A poetry compilation recounting a woman's journey from self-loathing to self-acceptance, confusion to clarity, and bitterness to forgiveness Following in the footsteps of such category killers as Milk and Honey and Whiskey Words & a Shovel I, Fariha RoÌ?isiÌ?n's poetry book is a collection of her thoughts as a ...

  20. IT'S MY BIRTHDAY

    How To Cure A Ghost. If you want to donate to me directly (especially for the visa) you can use Venmo and PayPal. Many of you have changed my life financially because of your generosity, and I thank you. Sometimes I feel ashamed that I actually rely so much on my readership, but I think back to the patronage that someone like Da Vinci had, for ...

  21. HOW TO CURE A GHOST

    How To Cure A Ghost was to exorcise my truth. One of abuse, one of pain, but one—ultimately of finding joy, serenity and liberation. One of finding God in the deep folds of my skin, of finding the divine in the mercy of my body. I see my writing as an example of finding peace, in hopes that others will gain insight, or at the very least, a ...

  22. on the care i need

    Let me disappear, let me be playful, let me be blunt. I just want to be loved for who I am, but so many people want me, need me, to be something for them without considering what I need in the equation of the friendship…. and I'm totally moving away from that kind of dynamic.

  23. Bravely Second: How to Cure Ghost

    Another way to cure Ghost is by bathing in the hot springs in either the city of Yunohana or aboard your ship, the Rubadub. The third way to cure Ghost is with the Patissier job. At level...

  24. No, aliens weren't spotted in Miami on New Year's Day

    No aliens at Miami mall, police say. Rafael Horta, a Miami police spokesperson, said the claim that the video shows aliens at the shopping center is false. "It's actually just a person walking ...

  25. I've had tinnitus for 20 years. Here's a promising solution

    A never-ending "eeeeeeeeee". I've had tinnitus since I was 21, a condition that means you hear "phantom" noise not created by external sources. It's often a constant ring but for some ...