Ghost VFX: Creating complex visual effects

Ghost VFX, Streamland Media’s visual effects division, is a leading visual effects house with Emmy® Award-winning talent and innovative technology, bringing creative visions to life. Ghost VFX’s dedicated teams around the globe make the impossible possible, fulfilling the demands of studios and independent creators alike.

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Creating complex visual effects

When an explosion in the Norwegian mountains awakens an ancient troll, officials appoint a fearless paleontologist to stop it from wreaking deadly havoc.

Ghost VFX artists in Copenhagen worked closely with director Roar Uthaug, VFX Supervisor Esben Syberg, and VFX Producer Mikael Windelin to create visual effects for key sequences in the film Troll and were responsible for designing and building the troll asset that was used by all VFX vendors working on the film.

Ghost VFX artists were thrilled to create a main character in a film that contains so much complexity in its surface details and simulated dynamics. The asset also had to be shared with other vendors that didn’t necessarily use the same pipeline tools making the task even more challenging. Ghost VFX benefited hugely from being able to communicate directly with the director to achieve his vision for the film.

The creation of the troll included everything from sculpting the base model, his facial expressions, and all surface details, to developing simulation workflows, building the rig, and underlying muscle structure, as well as texturing and shading the asset. It all had to be done to a level that would hold up in extreme close ups. 

They found key frame animation to be the best approach, compared to having an actor try to perform in slow motion or trying to slow down mocap data, which would very easily lead to weird and artificial results.

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About Ghost VFX

Founded in 1999, Ghost VFX is an Emmy® award-winning visual effects studio with more than 600 artists and production folks worldwide. Through a modern and efficient pipeline, their teams cover all aspects of visual effects and are committed to a professional and thorough process.

Ghost VFX flies on the talent of its imaginative artists. Collaborative and spirited, Ghost VFX exists to fulfill the dreams of their clients and artists alike. Every day they try their very best to make the impossible, possible and produce stunning imagery that quietly speaks for itself. 

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How stunning visual effects bring Ghost of Tsushima to life

How stunning visual effects bring Ghost of Tsushima to life

A deep dive into the wind, weather, and interactive particles that make Jin’s journey come alive.

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The island of Tsushima is a beautiful place to explore, made of many tiny details lovingly crafted by our team. It’s also considerably different from our last game, Infamous: Second Son, which was full of superpowered visual effects. I’m Matt Vainio, lead visual effects artist at Sucker Punch. I like to describe my job as solving art and design problems with technology, something I’ve been doing at Sucker Punch since Infamous 2. Today I’ll be covering how we made the transition from flashy superpowers to a grounded but beautiful game filled with mud, blood and steel – as well as the methods we used to create the visual effects in Ghost of Tsushima.

When we started Ghost I identified a couple of major areas of improvement, based on what the project needed. The first was that I wanted to push the levels of interactivity in our particle systems. We had a huge investment in expression-driven particle systems from Second Son, where we created a wide array of magical superpowers.  For Ghost of Tsushima, one of my main goals was to take that system and pivot it towards high levels of interactivity. We knew from the very beginning that wind was an important element we had to incorporate across particle systems and beyond. We also wanted to add animal life, provide epic vistas with environmental ambience and really nail the “mud, blood, & steel” direction by dynamically muddying and bloodying characters as they fight and move across the environment. There are a lot of ways we made particles more interactive, but it all required more data from the game world. These are just some of the examples of the kind of data I’m talking about: global wind, player-created wind from movement, character displacement, terrain, and water position info, weather info like wetness, time of day, and much more.

The second major goal was that we had to build at a large scale. The world of Ghost of Tsushima is significantly larger than Second Son but the Visual Effects team at Sucker Punch was only two people for most of the development. This meant we needed to update our content through automated processes as much as possible. We also had to support large vistas across a dynamic weather and 24 hour moving clock. Lastly, we hand-placed a small amount of elements to help guide the player during their exploration of the island of Tsushima.

One of the key art direction goals from the very beginning was that everything needed to move. This was an obvious area where particles could help by adding floating leaves and pollen in the air, but there are many systems that are all working in concert to provide the illusion of the wind actually blowing. Aside from the particles, there are trees, grass, cloth, and ropes that all move with the wind. All of these elements were tuned together so that they all moved appropriately under different wind conditions. We integrated this global wind direction into nearly every single effect in the game; when a bomb goes off or a campfire is lit, the smoke drifts in the correct wind direction. This is true for fires, sparks, smoke – pretty much everything. We also sample the speed of the wind to add additional turbulence as the wind speed increases.

We didn’t originally intend for our global wind system to become a navigation mode until the Art Director for Ghost, Jason Connell, came to one of our lead engineers, Adrian Bentley, and me to ask if we could make the particles be the direction indicator for quests. Thus, the “windicator” was born. Our approach was not to try and build a pathing system to constantly change directions to avoid obstacles, but to aim directly at the objective and leave the pathfinding to players. This was in large part because we wanted the player to be exploring, engaging their mind in the navigation process and not following some sort of game UI without thinking. This direct path approach was only possible because our particle system can access terrain information, which allowed us to have the particles aware of the landscape around the player.

In my first attempts I made particles hug the terrain, going up and down, flowing with the hills and valleys. This was problematic for a few reasons. The first is that our mountains have a lot of rock models for cliff faces; these cliff models are not part of the terrain information, only the underlying dynamically tessellated mesh was. This meant that the particles would clip right into all rock faces and disappear, making the windicator confusing to follow. It also looked a little unnatural hugging the terrain so perfectly, so my next attempt was to set the terrain as a floor so that particles would be pushed upward when moving uphill and let particles drift flat when the terrain sloped downhill away from them. I added upward velocity when hills are in the way by doing several tests ahead along the path of the particle’s motion. At each of these tests, the particle is looking to see how close it would be to the terrain at that point, or if it would even be buried. If the particle is too close or buried in these look-ahead points, the particle will be given upward velocity. Lastly, the windicator has different elements as the environment changes: pampas fluffs and grass in fields, leaves in forests, ash in burnt areas, and others. I’ll talk more about how that system works a little later in this post.

With foliage, the plants are all rigged with joints that respond to the local wind speed. We worked with the coding and environment teams to create separate controls for trunks from the branches, which allowed us the flexibility to create the wide variety of trees and shrubs needed for Tsushima. On top of the larger trunk and branch movement we layered noise that causes the smaller ripples across the leaf surfaces.

The grass and pampas fields were a particularly iconic element for the game and one that required a lot of back and forth work between the rendering, environment, and VFX teams. The fields are a mix of procedurally-generated triangles for the grass and modeled assets for the pampas stalks and tufts. Initially, we tried using particles to achieve the wave-like motion by displacing the grass in overlapping arcs. The visual quality on the grass was good, but it looked wrong for trees and bushes plus the performance cost was a bit higher than we could afford. For our second attempt, we added two layers of procedural gusts to the environment. The first is a large noise pattern that scrolls with the wind direction; layered on top is a texture that scrolls across the terrain for smaller details on the grass. The advantage of this approach (aside from cost improvements) was that we were able to use the coarser wind gust noise on the trees and bushes as well, which made the grass and other foliage match in a more seamless way.

We did actually end up using the particle grass displacement tech, but for pushing the grass around as the player and horse run through it. This has been done before in games, but one of the key improvements we made here was that by using the particle system to control the displacement, we were able to leverage our expressions for more advanced behavior. One of these behaviors was to make the grass bounce back in a realistic manner by applying a damped wave to the strength of the displacement, which prevents the grass from snapping back to its rest position in a linear and unnatural fashion. The video below is an example of the grass displacement and a debug view of the particle system controlling it. The green parts of the trail represent displacement and the red parts are where the displacement fades. If you look carefully you can see that the grass loses and then regains displacement values in smaller and smaller amounts as the trail gets further from the hero. This creates a natural reverberation of motion, making the grass feel more lifelike.

Last but not least, the character tech art team took the lead on adding dynamic cloth and ropes to the game due to their high use on the characters themselves. Each of the rope and cloth simulations uses the same wind inputs as the foliage and particles, adding to the illusion that there is actual wind moving through the scene.

We assumed early on that any animals the VFX team created would only be seen far away, but as the project evolved we realized they could play a bigger role. For this feature we teamed up with the same rendering coder who wrote the particle system during Second Son production, Bill Rockenbeck. His first step was to let particles spawn fully-rigged and animated mesh objects. Once that was up and running, using the same terrain position information we used on the windicator we could match the orientation of the models to the terrain and have them collide with it when necessary.

We added animals such as frogs, birds/cranes, fish, crabs, bugs – these creatures all have reactivity to Jin and other characters in the world. By using a very low value wind sphere around characters (including Jin) the animal particle effects are able to detect when people are nearby. We used a new conditional event system to change particle motion when this condition was met, causing the animals to scatter away from people. This was also used on projectiles and impacts, which meant that arrows and daggers would also scare animals away.

In the following video you can see some early iteration on the interactive crab effects scattered across the beaches. We started with some static meshes (probably my finest modeling efforts) and iterated on the behavior. I wanted the crabs to maintain some minimum range from Jin to prevent him standing directly on top of them and make them feel appropriately skittish. To help me debug behaviors, the crabs in the video are colored white when they are moving and orange when they are still.

Leaves and Duels

Because one of the hallmarks of Ghost of Tsushima is the wind, we knew that we would need to add a ton of leaves and make them feel really stylish, but also naturalistic. This is why there can be tens of thousands of leaves on screen at any moment in Ghost and they all interact with the wind, environment, and characters.

In order to make the leaves feel appropriately realistic, we spent a lot of effort on making them land correctly based on the terrain. Each leaf is modeled as a disc which uses 3D math to cause it to rotate appropriately in response to torques applied as it contacts the ground.  Beyond just landing on terrain, we modeled some other advanced behavior: leaves in Ghost land on water surfaces and flow with the current, and will fall down a waterfall and sink over time as they drift.

Near the end of development on Ghost, a QA tester came to me with a strange bug: leaves would fall into campfires and sit unburnt on the terrain under or next to the fire. I agreed this was pretty weird and decided to resolve this by placing a wind emitter in campfires that the falling leaves would react to. This upward draft kept leaves out of the fire for the most part and was a nice detail.

Duels became a well-loved element in Ghost from their first tests and from the very beginning the VFX team was given the reins by the game directors to help create scenarios that best showed off the interactivity in our game and particle systems.

In many of these duels, we created persistent leaves that would react to player and AI movements. For this, we repurposed the grass displacement tech we built and allowed particles to sample this information. By doing this, we were able to make the leaves part in a stylish way when characters moved rapidly through them. The goal here for duels was not perfect realism, but stylish beauty in motion. We used the same event system described above to look for times when the player displacement values were above a threshold; we then created a falloff so that the leaves would settle from the initial motion after a short time and could then be pushed again. We also used a noise pattern that temporarily allowed leaves to be picked up from the ground by the passing wind, helping to simulate gusts and the unstable nature of leaves.

Other types of duels also make heavy use of other dynamic particle systems, such as floating lanterns, candles that blow out, heavy fog parting at your feet, lightning strikes, and more. We used techniques similar to the leaves on the lanterns, where each lantern is actually a set of particles that move and bob on the water based on player displacement. For the dynamic candles in the second Ryuzo duel we added wind emitters to the sword swings and sampled those on the candles. If the wind passed a threshold, we used our event system to snuff out the fire and light while spawning up a new smoke wisp and ceiling smoke effect. Additionally, players generate wind while rolling and dodging, so quick movements past these special duel candles will also put them out.

Mud and blood

When characters run, roll, slide, and fall on the ground they dynamically add mud to their meshes. Having our characters get dirty as they live in our world was an early goal from art direction to set the tone of the game. During animations, we add mud “sources” in varying amounts to places like knees, elbows, and shoulders so that Jin and others look appropriately battle-dirty. If you look at famous fight scenes from samurai movies, you can see the inspiration for Ghost here: the characters push mud with their feet and are muddy from all of their interactions with the ground.

Like mud, we create blood sources that dynamically add blood to the character meshes during combat, showing their wounded state. Each impact added blood near the sword strike location and a bit beyond. This was used in cutscenes and scripted moments in addition to systemic combat.

Besides adding blood to character models, every attack creates a particle effect with thousands of blood droplets and blood strings. Each of the droplets lands on nearby geometry, and in the water it even disperses into clouds that move with the current.

Build at a large scale

A key component of building at scale was to make our VFX match up with environments and not have to hand place them. We knew that with our small team size and a giant world to fill that we would have to create some form of procedural placement because the environment biomes were changing very frequently. We didn’t want to spend all of our time just maintaining content, so it had to be self-correcting.

Growth and biomes

Here’s a simple example: we wanted particle leaves to fall in only the forested areas and not in the grasslands. The first approach we tried was very brute force: we placed an effect in the trees that were grown procedurally around the island. This failed pretty quickly because the environment was instancing hundreds of trees in small spaces, which, while fine for geometry, was too expensive for particle systems. We had some small success by setting our particles to only appear when very close to the trees (~50 feet), but this felt like a failure when the view distances were so far. The other problem with this approach was that when we dropped a leaf from the canopy 40 feet above and the player is riding a horse, it might not even fall into view by the time they passed the tree – so the leaves were often not visible.

Our second approach was to use the growth system in the same way as the environment, where we procedurally placed the particle systems alongside the trees in the same space by using the same masks and expressions. For this approach we needed to place overlapping circles of leaves within an occasionally complex mask shape. The circles were pushed in the distance of their radius from the edge of the mask rules, which meant there would often be large gaps where there were no leaves present due to the growth rules and expressions. We could balance this by creating more, smaller emitters, but at the cost of performance. It was also difficult to fix specific areas because if we changed the growth rules to fix the density or holes in an area we were looking at, we would often break other clusters of forest that were previously working well. Despite all of this, the technique mostly worked and even though there were some flaws we nearly shipped it.

Ghost of Tsushima - Map FX

In image 1, this screenshot demonstrates using our growth tool to add particles based on the rules that determine where the trees are. There are major gaps, so this ended up being below our bar. For image 2, I’ve increased the amount of particle emitters grown substantially. This nearly works, but takes up valuable performance we could use elsewhere. Image 3 shows our third approach, the biome map. One of our rendering programmers was working on a feature for the lighting team that would use data from the environmental growth masks that could be accessed in real-time. I asked if we could piggy-back on this technology and luckily enough we were able to do so. What this got us was the ability for the particle system to know what biome any specific particle was created in. Image 4 has a debug particle system that shows how the particles read this data. The blue areas are grasslands and the green is the forest.

The first pass of this was a little blocky but once I used a noise pattern to modify the sampled information it became much more organic and usable. This became the core of our new environmental ambience system when combined with other features like sampling the terrain position, material, and wind direction. In any average location, we were able to remove hundreds of grown particle systems from the environment and replace it with a single system that followed the camera and was much more accurate to the environmental biomes.

Even though we moved a good deal of our effects from the growth system into a real-time biome system, we did utilize the growth system for some particle effects in Ghost. Some examples include birds placed at the edges of forests, crabs and seagulls in the beach areas, herons in the rice paddy areas and cranes in the marshes. Lastly, we used the growth system to add fog banks at the edges of the forest. In all of these cases, whenever the environment team changed where the forests, fields, and beaches were located, the VFX came along automatically.

Vistas and navigation hints

In Ghost, the vistas are important to both the gameplay by helping you find objects as well as being an important part of setting the tone and art direction. We felt that finding quests should be as natural as possible so we created a variety of effects that could be used to indicate quest locations and challenge content. Some examples include different types and scales of smoke at mission or challenge content, birds that circle a haiku opportunity, steam rising from an onsen steam bath, and more.

Putting it all together

The visual effects in Ghost of Tsushima are an integral part of the environment, with every frame containing many separate systems working together to enhance the dynamic look of the game. From the foreground biome and animal elements to the background weather and content markers – the visual effects helped bring the world to life and make it a joy to explore Tsushima.

Thanks for reading and I hope you’ve enjoyed your journey through the visual effects of Tsushima. If you’re still curious to learn more about some of our underlying technology, you can watch a talk I gave for the Game Developers Conference in 2014 that focuses on our expression-driven particle systems.

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Ghost VFX to open new state-of-the-art studio in Pune with Prashant Shitole as head

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Ghost VFX, Streamland Media’s visual effects division, has announced it will open a new 32,000-square-foot studio in Pune, Maharashtra, India, early next year to meet the growing needs of filmmakers worldwide. Ghost India will offer clients a full range of high-end visual effects through cloud-based technology and an industry-leading talent roster that will function as a hybrid of work-from-home and in-studio.

Ghost VFX president Patrick Davenport says, “We are very excited to establish Ghost VFX in India, which is a critical part of expanding our worldwide services. Our leadership team has been working in India for over a decade, and we’re thrilled to be collaborating again with some of the very best artists in the business. Our experience has shown what works and what doesn’t! We are building a creative environment and culture which will support the teams in all our studios, enabling us to work seamlessly together across the globe.”

The new state-of-the-art studio will be led by Ghost VFX India VP and head of studio Prashant Shitole, who brings more than 20 years of top-tier VFX and animation experience to his new role. His credits include producing VFX for features, streaming, animation and games while working as head of production at MPC, The Mill, Double Negative and most recently at Method Studios.

“I’m thrilled to have the opportunity to lead the Ghost VFX expansion into India. I’m most excited about the creative team we are bringing together here. Ghost VFX is already a well-established creative resource for filmmakers around the world. The talented team here in India is joining a global studio of artists and technical experts who support filmmakers doing amazing work,” said Shitole.

In addition to Pune, Ghost VFX has locations worldwide in Los Angeles, Copenhagen, London, Manchester, Toronto, and Vancouver. Recent credits of the studio include Star Trek: Strange New Worlds , The Book of Boba Fett , and The Walking Dead .

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Ghost VFX, Streamland Media’s Visual Effects Division, to Open New Studio in India

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“We are very excited to establish Ghost VFX in India, which is a critical part of expanding our worldwide services,” says Ghost VFX President Patrick Davenport. “Our leadership team has been working in India for over a decade, and we’re thrilled to be collaborating again with some of the very best artists in the business. Our experience has shown what works—and what doesn’t! We are building a creative environment and culture which will support the teams in all our studios, enabling us to work seamlessly together across the globe.”

A white man with shoulder length curly hair and a white T-shirt smiles

The new state-of-the-art studio will be led by Ghost VFX India Vice President and Head of Studio Prashant Shitole, who brings more than 20 years of top-tier VFX and animation experience to his new role. His credits include producing VFX for features, streaming, animation and games, while working as head of production at MPC, The Mill, Double Negative and most recently at Method Studios.

“I’m thrilled to have the opportunity to lead the Ghost VFX expansion into India,” says Shitole. “I’m most excited about the creative team we are bringing together here. Ghost VFX is already a well-established creative resource for filmmakers around the world. The talented team here in India is joining a global studio of artists and technical experts who support filmmakers doing amazing work.”

In addition to Pune, Ghost VFX has locations worldwide in Los Angeles , Copenhagen, London, Manchester, Toronto, and Vancouver. Recent credits include Star Trek : Strange New Worlds , The Book of Boba Fett , and The Walking Dead .

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Star Trek: Discovery

Ghost VFX artists received a 2021 Emmy® for Outstanding Visual Effects in a Single Episode for the Star Trek: Discovery installment “Su’Kal.”

October 6, 2021

This fresh installment in the Star Trek franchise is set ten years before Kirk, Spock and follows the crew of the USS Discovery as they encounter new lifeforms and visit new worlds throughout the universe.

Ghost VFX began working on the Paramount+ series in the show’s first season with the number of shots steadily increasing each year.

“Over the years, Jason and his team have really come to trust us,” notes Phillip Prahl, Senior Vice President of Ghost VFX in Copenhagen. “They’re very good at communicating all of the client-side objectives while allowing us an enormous amount of creative control, which is amazing.”

Led by Supervising Producer / Lead VFX Supervisor Jason Michael Zimmerman, the winning Ghost VFX team includes VFX Supervisor Ivan Kondrup Jensen and VFX Producer Kristen Prahl. Also part of the winning team are VFX Supervisor Ante Dekovic, VFX Producer Aleksandra Kochoska, Lead VFX Artist Charles Collyer, and On Set VFX Supervisor Alexander Wood. Ghost VFX was the lead VFX house on the “Su’Kal” episode. Other vendors also part of the winning-team included DNEG VFX Supervisor Toni Pykalaniemi and Crafty Apes VFX Supervisor Leslie Chung.

For this episode, we collaborated on a monster. It was originally going to be an actor, but they decided to do it full CG and asked us to help design and develop the creature.”

Ivan Kondrup Jensen goes onto say,“we initially did several concepts, ranging from simple paintovers that augmented the practical build to full redesigns of the monster that would call for a complete VFX replacement. They chose the coolest and most complex solution preserving elements of the actor suit that we were integral in the original look. The acting was preserved, and it was great inspiration for us creatively.” Ghost VFX generated simulation-based effects, like cloth tearing and ink in water residue. “It’s basically a character that has underwater behavior,” explains Jensen. “The clothing is torn and behaves like cloth in water, while it’s emitting some fluid. We used Houdini to simulate all the layering of those elements, as well as the creation of the clothing.”

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IT'S ALL IN THE DETAILS

In one shot, the monster’s mood changes from calm to angry and it shows both in the body and facial animation. It is also reflected in the underwater type forces affecting the layers of simulation. To show this, Ghost VFX artists increased the turbulence and speed of the forces to build up energy, causing the cloth and tendrils to flutter. When it calms down, they toned down this effect to leave all the layers hanging weightless like cloth in calm waters. The tendrils were a challenge that were mostly solved with simulation but also a rigged setup was created for the bigger hero tendrils to allow the team of animators to control them. The keyframed tendrils then served as a guide for simulated versions of the tendrils. These types of shots required many layers that all affected each other. Ghost VFX worked on nearly 130 shots for the “Su’Kal” episode, and close to 500 shots for this season.

We leaned heavily on motion capture and performance capture. Using a mocap suit coupled with an iPhone we would capture data in our office and transfer it to our rig for tweaking.”

Watch Star Trek: Discovery on Paramount+

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  6. Watch Ghost VFX's breakdown for 'Troll'

    ghost vfx closed

VIDEO

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  4. Funny 😱🤯ghost vfx video

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COMMENTS

  1. Ghost VFX closed off suddenly with 5 min zoom meeting : r/vfx

    Ghost VFX closed off suddenly with 5 min zoom meeting Unverified information 279 Share Sort by: Open comment sort options Add a Comment axiomatic- • 9 mo. ago • Stickied comment • Edited 9 mo. ago

  2. My final goodbye to GHOST VFX

    A journey that had started 20 years earlier with the naive dream of creating a world-class VFX company in Copenhagen was coming to an end, at a time where all the items on our company bucket list...

  3. Ghost VFX

    Ghost VFX, Streamland Media's visual effects division, is a leading visual effects house with Emmy® Award-winning talent and innovative technology bringing creative visions to life. Ghost VFX's dedicated teams around the globe make the impossible possible, fulfilling the demands of studios and independent creators alike. ...

  4. r/vfx on Reddit: Ten years after Rhythm & Hues, nothing has changed. My

    I'm a bit sad these days hearing about my VFX brothers and sisters suffering in this business today. Layoffs at Crafty, Ghost, the verbal abuse by certain high-powered and now jobless individuals, the expectation that 10 hour days should be the minimum - it all just really feels yet another slap in the face at one of the industry's most hard working tradespeople.

  5. Ghost VFX

    Award-winning visual effects for feature film & episodic for over 20 years. | Ghost VFX, Streamland Media's visual effects division, is a leading visual effects house with award-winning talent...

  6. Ghost VFX

    Ghost VFX, Burbank, California. 9,085 likes · 12 talking about this · 274 were here. GHOST VFX

  7. Ghost VFX

    Ghost VFX, Streamland Media's visual effects division, is a leading visual effects studio with award-winning talent and innovative technology. Ghost VFX's dedicated teams around the globe ...

  8. Ghost VFX: Creating complex visual effects

    Sustainability Ghost VFX, Streamland Media's visual effects division, is a leading visual effects house with Emmy® Award-winning talent and innovative technology, bringing creative visions to life. Ghost VFX's dedicated teams around the globe make the impossible possible, fulfilling the demands of studios and independent creators alike.

  9. Troll

    When an explosion in the Norwegian mountains awakens an ancient troll, officials appoint a fearless paleontologist to stop it from wreaking deadly havoc. scope

  10. Ghost VFX, Streamland Media's Visual Effects Division, to Open New

    July 28, 2022 Ghost VFX, Streamland Media's visual effects division, has announced it will open a new 32,000 square-feet studio in Pune, Maharashtra, India, early next year to meet the growing needs of filmmakers worldwide.

  11. How stunning visual effects bring Ghost of Tsushima to life

    Duels became a well-loved element in Ghost from their first tests and from the very beginning the VFX team was given the reins by the game directors to help create scenarios that best showed off the interactivity in our game and particle systems. In many of these duels, we created persistent leaves that would react to player and AI movements.

  12. Coping with job rejections or ghosting : r/vfx

    VFX is weird right now, I run a small Post House and even the consistent clients I've had for years appear to be looking to find the "cheapest option" rather than the "best option". Keep your head of friend. Keep pushing. ... r/vfx • Ghost VFX closed off suddenly with 5 min zoom meeting.

  13. Ghost VFX Opens Vancouver Based Studio And Names Gillian Pearson Studio

    LOS ANGELES, Sept. 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Ghost VFX, a worldwide award-winning visual effects house, announced today the exciting unveiling of their newest studio location in Vancouver B.C.

  14. Ghost VFX to Open New Studio in Pune, India

    by August 2, 2022 Streamland Media's visual effects division, Ghost VFX has announced it will open a new 32,000 square-feet studio in Pune (Maharashtra, India). The studio is claimed to have a planned open date of early next year and is introduced to meet the growing needs of filmmakers worldwide.

  15. VFX BREAKDOWN

    VFX BREAKDOWN | FAST XGhost VFX worked closely with award-winning VFX Supervisor Peter Chiang, who oversaw the visual effects on the film. Ghost VFX's London...

  16. Ghost VFX to open new state-of-the-art studio in Pune with Prashant

    Ghost VFX, Streamland Media's visual effects division, has announced it will open a new 32,000-square-foot studio in Pune, Maharashtra, India, early next year to meet the growing needs of filmmakers worldwide. Ghost India will offer clients a full range of high-end visual effects through cloud-based technology and an industry-leading talent ...

  17. Fast X

    "The main sequence Ghost VFX worked on is a huge confrontation that forms a pivotal story moment, as several of the main characters battle it out on a huge bridge. Ghost VFX was tasked with working on the bridge sequence, which spans a fictional expanse of water between Rio de Janeiro and Puerto Rico. And this being the latest installment in ...

  18. Ghost VFX, Streamland Media's Visual Effects Division, to Open New

    LOS ANGELES (July 28, 2022) — Ghost VFX, Streamland Media's visual effects division, has announced it will open a new 32,000 square-feet studio in Pune, Maharashtra, India, early next year to meet the growing needs of filmmakers worldwide. Ghost India will offer clients a full range of high-end visual effects through cloud-based technology ...

  19. Award-winning visual effects house Ghost VFX opens Vancouver studio

    Oct 5 2020, 4:16 pm. One of Ghost FX's many projects, AMC's The Walking Dead. (Ghost FX/Facebook) An award-winning visual effects studio has recently expanded its roots to Vancouver. Ghost VFX, described as a "worldwide award-winning visual effects house," recently unveiled a Vancouver studio located on 2339 Columbia Street.

  20. Case Studies

    Ghost VFX has partnered with Paramount+ on the Star Trek franchise since Discovery's first season with the number of shots steadily increasing each year. See Case Study. The Book of Boba Fett. Ghost VFX completed a variety of visual effects for one of the latest installments of the Star Wars franchise, The Book of Boba Fett. ...

  21. Ghost street in San Francisco where almost all shops have now closed

    Ghost street in San Francisco where almost all shops have now closed The photos, within six hours of being posted, have amassed more than 8,500 views, and are quickly circulating across the internet.

  22. Avatar 2 Hands Breakdown Revealed : r/vfx

    The alternate reality of this shot is with inexperienced director and vfx sup where they tried to do this shot in cg with 10x the budget and going nowhere because without the plate , we will be doing 1000x version of water sim with overkill foams and interaction. ... r/vfx • Ghost VFX closed off suddenly with 5 min zoom meeting. See more ...

  23. Salt built this California ghost town. Now salt is destroying it.

    The post office closed in 1950; the school district dissolved the next year. Although the salt mill continued to churn through imported salt, the town was no more. In the 1970s, the mill finally ...

  24. Star Trek: Discovery

    Ghost VFX worked on nearly 130 shots for the "Su'Kal" episode, and close to 500 shots for this season. We leaned heavily on motion capture and performance capture. Using a mocap suit coupled with an iPhone we would capture data in our office and transfer it to our rig for tweaking." Watch Star Trek: Discovery on Paramount+ Next Case Study

  25. Setting up Nuke in a mock studio environment : r/vfx

    Setting up Nuke in a mock studio environment. This is one for the pipeline peeps! I want to set up Nuke at home in a similar way to how a studio would set it up. This is my plan: Nuke's license server is running on a small CentOS PC on the LAN. Synology NAS for media. Set up plugins and gizmo's on the NAS. Set up Deadline to render on an old PC ...